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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Baumgartner, Frank"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Russell, Annelise. The politics of prioritization.

Degree: Government, 2018, University of Texas – Austin

Political agenda-setting research primarily studies how political institutions direct policy attention and gives little consideration to individual decision-making (Baumgartner and Jones 2009; Kingdon 1995; Baumgartner et al. 2011). This dissertation examines policymakers’ strategic communications to illuminate the important but less understood agenda-setting patterns of individuals. The normalization of social media platforms, like Twitter, gives U.S. senators a new platform to aggregate their policy priorities into a complex agenda that reveals individual decision-making and prioritization. Senators face pressures from constituents, the party, and the institution that lead them to structure unique agenda setting patterns that have implications for both policy and representation. Using a new dataset of all tweets by U.S. senators, I offer new insight into how individual senators divide their limited attention. First, senators must strike a balance between policy and representation because attention to policy results in less time for constituent issues. Second, for political priorities, there is an asymmetric pattern of partisan attention such that Republicans prioritize politics and use partisan rhetoric more often in their political communication. By using a hybrid media measure like Twitter, I glean useful insight into a politician’s agenda to not only understand how politicians rank issues but more broadly the role of policy, politics and representation within a senator’s agenda. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Bryan D. (advisor), Theriault, Sean (committee member), Wlezien, Chris (committee member), Baumgartner, Frank (committee member), Sparrow, Bartholomew (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Congress; Twitter

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Russell, A. (2018). The politics of prioritization. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68543

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Russell, Annelise. “The politics of prioritization.” 2018. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68543.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Russell, Annelise. “The politics of prioritization.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Russell A. The politics of prioritization. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68543.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Russell A. The politics of prioritization. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68543

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

2. Thomas, Herschel Fred III. Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process.

Degree: Government, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

This dissertation is a study of contagion effects in policymaking. The policy process behaves in many ways like a complex system, which is characterized by communication among actors, dynamic interaction, and evolution in behavior over time. As a result, the attention of policy elites rapidly jumps from issue to issue as they struggle to address an array of pressing issues and problems simultaneously. I argue that a process of issue contagion explains these rapid changes as policy elites are highly interdependent actors who are subject to cognitive limits, have incentives to closely monitor the political environment, and frequently mimic the behavior of their peers. Drawing on the methods of computational social science, I build a simulation model of agenda-setting behavior and examine issue contagion through an experimental research design. I test the empirical implications of the model by applying it to real-world datasets—from the disclosed lobbying activity of organized interests to the bill introductions of members of Congress. The core contribution of the project is that patterns in attention to policy issues are a function of a contagion process generated by cue-taking behavior among elites. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Bryan D. (advisor), Baumgartner, Frank R (committee member), Wlezien, Chris (committee member), Roberts, Brian E (committee member), Theriault, Sean M (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Agenda-setting; Contagion; Cue-taking; Policy process

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thomas, H. F. I. (2015). Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thomas, Herschel Fred III. “Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process.” 2015. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thomas, Herschel Fred III. “Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process.” 2015. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Thomas HFI. Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Thomas HFI. Contagious agendas : the spread of issue attention in the policy process. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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