Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston" +contributor:("Carter, Michele A"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

1. [No author]. Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering .

Degree: University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

This dissertation uses texts and methods of the medical humanities to interrogate the troubled relationship between modern American medicine and the mystery of human suffering. Methods used include conceptual analysis, close reading and comparison of historical texts, and narrative interpretation. These methods connect seemingly discrete lines of inquiry to reveal hidden cultural assumptions that influence the biomedical enterprise, particularly with respect to the expectations that practitioners and patients have about medicine's functions, abilities, and goals. I argue that medicine's inability to respond to patient suffering is a feature of a broader myopia within the culture of medicine—namely, how medicine functions in religious ways. My focus led me to pay greatest attention to one particular religious feature—medicine's adoption of an eschatological narrative. This narrative works within medicine in such a way as to obfuscate the interpretive means available to practitioners. The hope encapsulated by the eschatological narrative is manifested through its promises of ever more sophisticated ways of controlling the body via technological advancement. The experience of suffering has little place within this exciting narrative; suffering is marginalized or silenced within the practitioner-patient encounter. Elders, whose bodies' natural decline most starkly challenges the narrative's promises, are also those whose suffering is often neglected. Elder suffering helps simultaneously teach about the challenge of suffering and the eschatological narrative's limits. After chronicling the narrative's historical development, I demonstrate how the humanist project is particularly suited for developing ways of engaging with elder suffering. The medical humanities give means for cultivating habits of being that resist the eschatological narrative's limiting nature. Studying and practicing the humanities can equip the practitioner with creative ways of engaging the breadth of humanity, its multiple sources of suffering, and the particular ways that aging can be experienced. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Anne Hudson (advisor), Carter, Michele A (committeeMember), Vaiani, Cheryl Ellis (committeeMember), Grumbles, L. Lee (committeeMember), Cole, Thomas R. (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Medical Humanities; Geriatrics; Gerontology; Suffering; Religion and Medicine, Literature and Medicine, History of Medicine

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (n.d.). Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering . (Thesis). University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/11138

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering .” Thesis, University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/11138.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering .” Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

author] [. Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/11138.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Medicine's Eschatological Narrative and the Challenge of Elder Suffering . [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/11138

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

2. [No author]. Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy .

Degree: University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

Abstract: Over the course of the next two decades an unprecedented number of Americans will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. In order that their consent to or rejection of medical treatment is truly informed, they need accurate and relevant information, including, but not limited to, the following: The functional impairment and loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease has a particular route of progression and thus generally predictable trajectory. Equally foreseeable are the medical treatment and care issues that will likely arise as a consequence of that trajectory, as are the treatment and care option for addressing those issues. Accordingly, individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and their families can develop a reasonably accurate set of expectations, and can prepare accordingly. Prior to the loss of decisional capacity individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease possess the legal authority to reject life-sustaining medical treatment, including, but not limited to, artificial nutrition and hydration, subject only to constitutionally valid limitations on that authority imposed by state legislation, currently in force only in a handful of states. Subject to certain constitutionally valid limitations and/or evidentiary standards re: the determination of their previously expressed or implied intention, individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, in anticipation of the possible loss of decisional capacity, have the legal authority to refuse, in advance, life-sustaining medical treatment, including artificial nutrition and hydration. Individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease also possess the moral authority to make such a rejection, when in their assessment; the life-sustaining medical treatment in question imposes a foreseeable harm(s) and/or continuing burden(s) that is, on balance, disproportionate to its foreseeable benefit, if any. Advisors/Committee Members: Winslade, William J (advisor), Carter, Michele A (committeeMember), Rich, Ben (committeeMember), Schreiber, Melvyn (committeeMember), Vanderpool, Harold V (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Alzheimer's Disease; Artificial Nutrition and Hydration; Palliative Sedation; Advance Directives

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (n.d.). Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy . (Thesis). University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/815

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy .” Thesis, University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/815.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy .” Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

author] [. Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/815.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Limitations on the Precedent Autonomy . [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/815

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

3. [No author]. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .

Degree: University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston

The subspecialty of literature and medicine is significant, not only as a supplement to an education in biomedicine and science, but also as a serious engagement in the pursuit of humane feeling essential in the cultivation of health professionals. I aim to convince the instructors of medicine and health care in Japan that incorporating a program of literature and medicine in their curricula is important to create health professionals endowed with skills of narrative analysis and interpretation, and other essential qualities required in the practitioner-patient relationship, such as empathy, moral imagination, and ethical reflection. In Part I, I outline the emergence and development of literature and medicine in the United States and initiate Japanese faculty into the historical necessity of the birth of the subspecialty and the therapeutic effect of reading texts of literature for the well-being of future clinicians. Another objective of my dissertation is to demonstrate to the scholars of literature and medicine in the United States the importance of cultural diversity in the selection of reading materials. Cross-cultural sensitivity has been one of the most urgent issues in the practice of medicine, health care, and bioethics. Part II is so crafted that Japanese educators may note the possibility of their literary tradition serving to expose their students to opportunities for moral inquiry and deliberation. Reading Japanese works of literature with topics that deeply concern the human condition may work for Western audiences as an enrichment program of cultural awareness and literacy. Part III offers my model programs for an international collaboration in literature and medicine. I have selected nine pairs of Western and Japanese texts of literature and illness narrative. This part also works as an advanced course of English comprehension for Japanese students. By reading each combination of works that have a common theme, one can be aware of differences in ways medical and ethical issues, such as autonomy and decision making, are addressed in another culture and can acknowledge universally compelling human suffering in the descriptions of pain, illness, aging, relationships, caring, and dying and death. Advisors/Committee Members: Hudson Jones, Anne (advisor), Carter, Michele A (committeeMember), Vanderpool, Harold Y (committeeMember), Huang, Frederick S (committeeMember), Poirier, Suzanne (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Literature and Medicine; Medical Education; Medical Humanities; Humanities; Health-Care Ethics; Japanese Medical Schools; Japanese Literature; Americal Literature; Narratives of Illness; Illness Culture; Caregiving; Nursing; Apollo; Physician-Authors; Impaired Physicians; Tuberculosis; Trauma; Trauma Studies; Mental Retardation; Disability; Empathy; Cultural Studies; Spirituality; Abortion; Mental Illness; Feminist Studies; Aging; Cancer Narratives; Death and Dying; Euthanasia; Suicide; Autonomy; Disclosure; Decision Making; Curricula

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (n.d.). Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . (Thesis). University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .” Thesis, University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of .” Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

author] [. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Literature and Medicine: A Teaching Model for the Students and Practitioners of . [Thesis]. University of Texas Medical Branch – Galveston; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/787

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.