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You searched for +publisher:"University of Tennessee – Knoxville" +contributor:("Peter D. Krawczel"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Tennessee – Knoxville

1. Kull, Jessie Ann. Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2018, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

The objective of the study was to determine the effects of sleep or lying deprivation on the behavior, production, metabolism and immune function of dairy cows. Data were collected from 8 multi- and 4 primi-parous cows (DIM = 199 ± 44 (mean ± SD); days pregnant = 77 ± 30). Each cow experienced: 1) 24 h sleep deprivation implemented by noise or physical contact and 2) 24 h lying deprivation imposed by a wooden grid placed on the pen floor that prevented a recumbent position. An 11-d collection period (from 2 d before the first treatment (trt) to 8 d after trt) was followed by 12-d washout periods. Study days were organized from 2100 to 2059. During habituation (d -2 and -1 before trt), baseline (d 0), and trt (d 1), housing was individual stalls (mattress with no bedding). After trt, cows returned to sand-bedded freestalls for a 7-d recovery period (d 2 to 8). Lying behaviors were recorded by accelerometers attached to the hind leg. Milk yield was recorded 2× daily. NEFA and glucose concentrations were evaluated from serum sampled at 0300, 0900, 1500, and 2100 on d 1 and 2. Data were analyzed using a mixed model in SAS including fixed effects of trt, day, and their interaction with significant main effects separated using a PDIFF statement (<i>P</i> ≤ 0.05). Lying time decreased during trt and increased on the first day of recovery for lying deprivation compared to sleep deprivation (d 1: 1.9 vs. 8.4 ± 0.7 h/d (mean ± pooled SE); <i>P</i> < 0.001; d 2: 16.8 vs. 13.6 ± 0.7 h/d; <i>P</i> = 0.002). Milk yield decreased during lying deprivation compared to sleep (<i>P</i> = 0.002). NEFA and glucose varied by time (<i>P</i> ≤ 0.03). IL-1β and TNF-α were higher during trt, compared to baseline for both treatments (day: <i>P</i> = 0.04 and <i>P</i> = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, this suggests, lack of access to resting resources rather than the relative comfort of that resource, may have greater long-term effects on the welfare of dairy cows. Advisors/Committee Members: Peter D. Krawczel, Helen A. Baghdoyan, Gina M. Pighetti.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kull, J. A. (2018). Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5089

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kull, Jessie Ann. “Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows.” 2018. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5089.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kull, Jessie Ann. “Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows.” 2018. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kull JA. Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5089.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kull JA. Effects of Acute Lying and Sleep Deprivation on the Behavior and Immune Function of Lactating Dairy cows. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5089

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Tennessee – Knoxville

2. Edwards, Erika Mae. Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2018, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Around calving, dairy cows must cope with nutritional, physiological, and environmental stressors, which puts them at an increased risk for detrimental outcomes. Understanding dairy cows’ maternal behaviors and their preferred calving environment can aid in addressing how to properly manage and house them. The objectives were to determine (1) dairy cattle’s preference for calving environment and factors associated with their preference, (2) the herd’s location in relation to individual animals that did or did not separate from the group for calving, (3) lying behaviors at calving, (4) individual animal’s movement throughout the environment at calving, and (5) if lying behaviors and movement throughout the environment change based on calving location preference when group-housed in a bedded-pack barn with free access to pasture. The barn served as section 1, and the pasture was divided into 8 sections. Sections 2 through 8 were areas of flat, open pasture. Section 9 was surrounded by natural forage cover at the end of the pasture. Cattle most frequently selected the barn and natural forage cover area for calving. Parity and heat stress were associated with selection of calving location. When cattle separated from the herd to calve, the majority of the herd was at least 2 sections away, while cattle that did not separate to calve stayed within the same section as the majority of the herd. On the day of calving, lying time and lying bout duration decreased, and lying bouts, steps, and movement throughout the environment increased. None of these behaviors were affected by preference for calving location. These results suggest dairy cattle have different preferences at calving and will seek out an area where they have cover overhead and surrounding them. When designing calving facilities, various preferences should be considered. Furthermore, cattle’s lying behaviors and movement change leading up to calving when provided with a barn and pasture. Future research should focus on determining how to accommodate these behaviors in indoor calving facilities. Advisors/Committee Members: Peter D. Krawczel, Elizabeth A. Eckelkamp, Brian K. Whitlock.

Subjects/Keywords: dairy cattle; behavior; calving; environmental preferences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edwards, E. M. (2018). Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edwards, Erika Mae. “Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving.” 2018. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edwards, Erika Mae. “Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving.” 2018. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Edwards EM. Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Edwards EM. Environmental Preferences and Behavior of Transition Dairy Cattle Kept on Pasture at the Time of Calving. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Tennessee – Knoxville

3. Kesterson, Clay Brent. The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2018, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Our objective was to determine the effect of pair versus individual housing of calves on growth, behavior, and immunity. At 5 ± 1 d relative to birth, calves with successful passive transfer of immunoglobulins from colostrum were blocked by sex and birth date. Housing treatment was assigned to either pair (n = 14) or individual (n =14) housing. Calf pairing was implemented by combining two individual pens. One paired calf served as the focal calf and the other imposed treatment. All data were collected from the focal calf in pair housing. Control calves remained individually housed. ADG, DM, feed refusals, and growth at weaning to one-week-post weaning did not differ between housing treatments. Paired calves spent more time awake, and increased standing time. Individual calves projected their head out of the pen more frequently. Hunger and anticipation behaviors did not differ between housing treatments. These data suggest paired calves were more active during the milk feeding stage. The increased activity of pair housed calves may suggest improved welfare of preweaned calves. IgG and IgM ELISA units to keyhole limpet heomocyanin did not differ between housing treatments. IgG ELISA units at d 14 were lower than d 3, 28, and 35 in all calves. IgM ELISA units were highest at d 3, but continued to drop thereafter. The stimulation index for delayed hypersensitivity to <i>Candida albicans</i> did not differ between housing treatments. However, they did increased over time, and peaked at 24 and 48 h post <i>C. albicans</i> injections. Pain sensitivity did not differ between housing treatments, however calves increased sensitivity at 27, 51, and 75 h, relative to disbudding. Pair housing dairy calves during the preweaned period did not negatively affect the immune development of dairy calves or pain from disbudding. This suggests social housing calves early in life does not suppress the immune system, or increase pain sensitivity after disbudding. Advisors/Committee Members: Peter D. Krawczel, James Marcus Caldwell, Gina M. Pighetti.

Subjects/Keywords: calf; immunity; behavior; welfare; pain sensitivity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kesterson, C. B. (2018). The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5148

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kesterson, Clay Brent. “The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity.” 2018. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5148.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kesterson, Clay Brent. “The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity.” 2018. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kesterson CB. The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5148.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kesterson CB. The Effects of Pair versus Individual Housing Preweaned Dairy Calves on Behavior, Growth, and Acquired Immunity. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5148

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.