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You searched for +publisher:"University of Tennessee – Knoxville" +contributor:("Ky G. Pohler, F. Neal Schrick"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Tennessee – Knoxville

1. Abbott, Chelsea Ruth. Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2018, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

The objective of this study was to develop an in vivo model to assess thermoregulatory response of lactating dairy cows to heat stress. Hyperthermia occurring for 10 to 12 hours after LH surge reduces quality of maturing oocyte, thereby reducing fertility. Between the months of February through May, cows were transported to a climate-controlled facility and maintained at a temperature-humidity index (THI) of 65.9 ± [plus or minus] 0.2 (thermoneutral) or exposed to increases in THI of 0.8 ± 0.1 units per hour (heat stress) for 12 hours before rapidly cooling to thermoneutral conditions. Mixed model regressions with repeated measures were used to test respiration rates (RR) and rectal temperature (RT). Within 40 and 110 min of increasing THI, RR increased in a quadratic fashion (P < [less than] 0.001); RT increased by 0.04 ± 0.1° [degree] C (P < 0.001) per unit THI. Changes in RR lagged THI and preceded rises in RT by 30 min. Average THI 3-days prior to treatment influenced changes in RR (P = [equal] 0.050) and RT (P < 0.001). Increased RR was more noticeable in heat-stressed cows when prior THI was in the 40s than low 60s. Rectal temperature of heat-stressed cows was 0.8 ± 0.02°C lower when prior THI was in the 40s versus low 60s. Progesterone and LH levels before treatment were predictive of thermoregulatory response in heat-stressed cows. Rapid cooling decreased RR by 0.6 ± 0.1 bpm (P < 0.001) and RT by 0.02 ± 0.002°C per min (P < 0.002). Speed and magnitude of thermoregulatory changes to an acute heat stress and after sudden cooling emphasizes the importance of strategic cooling before ovulation. Efforts to do so when prior THI approaches levels expected to induce mild stress are especially important. Respiration rate is a useful indicator of the degree of hyperthermia a lactating cow is experiencing during an acute heat stress event. Advisors/Committee Members: J. Lannett Edwards, Ky G. Pohler, F. Neal Schrick.

Subjects/Keywords: acute heat stress; dairy cow

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abbott, C. R. (2018). Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abbott, Chelsea Ruth. “Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge.” 2018. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abbott, Chelsea Ruth. “Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge.” 2018. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Abbott CR. Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5140.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Abbott CR. Thermoregulatory responses of lactating dairy cows to an acute heat stress after a pharmacologically-induced LH surge. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2018. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5140

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Tennessee – Knoxville

2. Speckhart, Savannah L. Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2019, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Pregnancy success is a key factor in order for any beef producer to have a profitable operation. Subsequently, the ability to detect compromised pregnancies is of upmost importance. Currently, pregnancy-associated glycoproteins [PAG], which are secreted by the ruminant placenta, remain as the only chemical-based, pregnancy-specific detection method available on a commercial scale for cattle pregnancy diagnosis. Furthermore, PAG cannot be used for diagnosis until day 28 of gestation. Small noncoding RNAs, microRNAs [miRNAs], have been successfully used as biomarkers for certain human diseases and disorders. It is possible that pregnancy-associated miRNAs located in bovine serum and uterine flush fluid can be detectable prior to PAG. Additionally, management efforts, such as evaluating reproductive tracts and estrus expression, can be performed prior to breeding to potentially identify and select females with optimal fertility. The aim of the two studies is to determine if pregnancy-related miRNAs can be identified in bovine serum and uterine flush fluid on day 18 of gestation, and to determine if reproductive tract size and position scores [SPS] and estrus are useful predictors of fertility in Bos indicus and Bos taurus cows. The first study was able to identify two novel extracellular vesicle-miRNAs as being more abundant in pregnant heifers compared with non-pregnant heifers on day 18 of gestation in both serum and uterine flush fluid. The second study identified that pregnancy rate, but not pregnancy loss, is interactively influenced by reproductive tract SPS and estrus activity. Advisors/Committee Members: Ky G. Pohler, F. Neal Schrick, J. Lannett Edwards, Justin Rhinehart.

Subjects/Keywords: cow; estrus; fertility; microRNA; reproductive tract size and position

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Speckhart, S. L. (2019). Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Speckhart, Savannah L. “Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle.” 2019. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed April 15, 2021. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Speckhart, Savannah L. “Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle.” 2019. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Speckhart SL. Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5505.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Speckhart SL. Detection and Management of Pregnancy Outcomes in Cattle. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2019. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/5505

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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