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You searched for +publisher:"University of Tennessee – Knoxville" +contributor:("Agustin G. Rius"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Tennessee – Knoxville

1. Kassube, Kimberly Rose. The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2016, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Heat stress (HS) causes decreases in production of lactating cattle that is only partially explained by decreases in intake. Evidence suggests that changes in energy and protein metabolism occur to cope with the impact of HS. The objective of this thesis was to determine if the effect of jugular infusion of essential amino acids (AA) ameliorated the negative effects of HS in milk production and metabolism. Twelve multiparous lactating Holstein cows were used in a crossover design to evaluate the effect of thermoneutral (THN) and HS environments along with the absence (CTL) or presence (ML+BCAA) of essential AA infusion. Infusions consisted of methionine (12 g), lysine (21 g), leucine (35 g), isoleucine (15 g), and valine (15 g) per day. Thermal treatments were imposed from days 1 to 14 and jugular infusion of AA from days 7 to 14. Milk and blood samples were collected on days 5 to 7 and 12 to 14. Data were analyzed using the Mixed procedure of SAS and reported as least square means ± [plus or minus] standard error of the mean. Temperature humidity index (THI) values during THN never exceeded 66, whereas THI values during HS peaked at 76 and were above 68 for 14 h/d. Compared with the CTL treatment, ML+BCAA treatment increased rectal and vaginal temperatures in the HS treatment by 0.5 and 0.4°C respectively, but did not increase temperatures in the THN treatment (interaction P < 0.05). Heat stress decreased (P < 0.05) DMI (17.4 vs 18.9±0.41 kg/d), milk yield (29.3 vs 32.1±1.09 kg/d), milk protein percentage (2.95 vs 3.06±0.06%), and milk protein yield (0.87 vs 0.98 ±0.05 kg/d). The ML+BCAA treatment had no effect on milk and milk protein yield but increased (P <0.001) milk protein percent (3.04 vs 2.96±0.06%). Heat stress elicited expected decreases in production, while the infusion of AA increased milk protein percent indicating a possible improvement of protein synthesis. However, the rise in rectal temperatures due to infusion is a cause for concern. Advisors/Committee Members: Agustin G. Rius, Travis Mulliniks, Lannett Edwards, Peter Krawczel.

Subjects/Keywords: heat stress; dairy cattle; branched-chain amino acids; lysine; methionine; Dairy Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kassube, K. R. (2016). The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4010

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kassube, Kimberly Rose. “The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle.” 2016. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed January 26, 2020. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4010.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kassube, Kimberly Rose. “The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle.” 2016. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kassube KR. The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4010.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kassube KR. The Effect of Heat Stress and Essential Amino Acids on Production and Metabolism of Lactating Dairy Cattle. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2016. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4010

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Tennessee – Knoxville

2. Negga, Rekek. Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2015, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) use has been associated with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant human pathogens of animal origins. The global trend of restricting AGP necessitates the need to develop effective alternatives that will maintain safety and sustainability of food animals. Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is an intestinal enzyme that is produced by diverse gut bacterial species and involved in host lipid metabolism. Recent studies suggest that BSH inhibitors are promising alternatives to AGP for enhanced growth performance and animal health. Using a high-purity BSH from a chicken Lactobacillus salivarius, a panel of BSH inhibitors has been identified. However, it is still unknown if these inhibitors also inhibit the function of the BSH from other bacterial species with significant sequence variation and substrate spectrum. In this study, we compared the BSH from L. salivarius to that from L. acidophilus BSH. Sequence alignment and structure modeling indicated the two BSH enzymes contain conserved catalytically important amino acid residues and domain. Using a high-purity BSH from L. acidophilus, we demonstrated that the previously identified BSH inhibitors also exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the L. acidophilus BSH. A large scale chicken experiment was conducted to examine the effect of dietary supplementation of riboflavin, a potent BSH inhibitor, on growth performance of broilers. Briefly, 300 one-day-old Hubbard broiler chicks were randomly assigned into three treatment groups (10 pens per group, 10 birds per pen) that received one of following diets: 1) a basal diet with no riboflavin added (control); 2) a basal diet + low dose of riboflavin (20 mg/kg); and 3) a basal diet + high dose of riboflavin (200 mg/kg). Dietary supplementation of riboflavin, regardless of dose, significantly increased BW gain by day 21 (P < 0.0053). Significantly improved FCR was only observed for the chickens that received the low dose of riboflavin on day 21 (P < 0.030). High performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the levels of riboflavin in various diets. The concentrations of total bile acids in the blood and ileal samples collected on day 14, 33, and 42 were not significantly changed in response to riboflavin treatment. Advisors/Committee Members: Jun Lin, Mike O. Smith, Agustin G. Rius.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Negga, R. (2015). Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/3448

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Negga, Rekek. “Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health.” 2015. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed January 26, 2020. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/3448.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Negga, Rekek. “Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health.” 2015. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Negga R. Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/3448.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Negga R. Bile Salt Hydrolase: A Microbiome Target for Enhanced Animal Health. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2015. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/3448

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Tennessee – Knoxville

3. Kaufman, Jeffrey D. Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions.

Degree: MS, Animal Science, 2016, University of Tennessee – Knoxville

The objective is to determine the effect of reducing nitrogen input through feeding low rumen degradable protein (RDP) and rumen undegradable protein (RUP) proportions on milk production, nitrogen efficiency and metabolism in heat-stressed cows. Forty-eight mid-lactating, Holstein cows were assigned to treatments using a randomized block design in a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments (n = 12/treatment). Treatments included two levels of RDP (10 and 8%) and two levels of RUP (8 and 6%). From d 1 to 21, a common diet (10% RDP-8% RUP) was fed to cows followed with their respective treatment diets fed from d 22 to 42 of the study. Cows were housed in a freestall barn and exposed to the prevailing temperature and humidity of July and August with no supplemental cooling. Milk samples were collected and analyzed, and plasma was harvested for analysis of metabolites from d 42. Treatment differences were tested using the MIXED procedure of SAS and reported as least square means ± [plus or minus] standard error of the mean. Rectal temperatures increased from a.m. to p.m., indicating cows were experiencing heat stress. The 10% RDP treatment decreased vaginal temperatures compared with 8% RDP in the 8% RUP (39.0 vs. 39.4 ± 0.14°C), but remained unchanged in the 6% RUP treatment (39.4 vs. 39.3 ± 0.14°C). The 8% RDP treatment increased energy-corrected milk (ECM) compared with 10% RDP in the 6% RUP treatment (31.7 vs. 29.4 ± 0.76 kg/d), but reduced ECM in the 8% RUP treatment (32.5 vs. 33.0 ± 0.76 kg/d). The 8% RDP treatment improved nitrogen utilization efficiency compared with 10% RDP (35.1 vs. 31.6 ± 0.76%). The 6% RUP treatment improved nitrogen utilization efficiency compared with 8% RUP (35.1 vs. 31.6 ± 0.76%). The 8% RDP treatment increased glucose concentrations compared with the 10% RDP treatment (3.13 vs. 2.98 ± 0.07 mmol/L). The 8% RDP treatment decreased insulin vi concentrations compared with the 10% RDP treatment (15.8 vs. 20.9 ± 1.55 μU/mL). Therefore, diets with low RDP and RUP may increase nitrogen utilization efficiency and metabolism without reducing milk production in heat-stressed dairy cows. Advisors/Committee Members: Agustin G. Rius, Peter D. Krawczel, Gina M. Pighetti, John T. Mulliniks, Arnold M. Saxton.

Subjects/Keywords: Heat stress; Dairy cows; Protein metabolism; Nitrogen efficiency; Milk production; Energy utilization; Agricultural Economics; Biochemistry; Comparative Nutrition; Dairy Science; Other Animal Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kaufman, J. D. (2016). Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions. (Thesis). University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Retrieved from https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4293

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaufman, Jeffrey D. “Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions.” 2016. Thesis, University of Tennessee – Knoxville. Accessed January 26, 2020. https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4293.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaufman, Jeffrey D. “Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions.” 2016. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kaufman JD. Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4293.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kaufman JD. Effect of Varying Rumen Degradable and Undegradable Protein on Milk Production and Nitrogen Efficiency in Lactating Dairy Cows under Summer Conditions. [Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Knoxville; 2016. Available from: https://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_gradthes/4293

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.