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You searched for +publisher:"University of Tennessee – Chattanooga" +contributor:("Klug, Hope M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Hudson, Amelia. Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee.

Degree: 2013, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Invasive species exist outside of their native ranges and can cause environmental harm where they have been introduced. One such species is kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata), an invasive vine in the southeastern U.S. Although kudzu is one of the most common invasive species management concerns in the Southeast, there is little quantitative data documenting its effects on native species. This study examines the seasonal correlations between kudzu and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee. By measuring the characteristics of the overstory, midstory, and understory vegetation at sites with differing levels of kudzu coverage, I examined correlations between kudzu density and avian demographics. Kudzu coverage had a significant negative impact on avian diversity and species richness, as well as on native vegetation. Kudzu’s alteration of vegetation structure, through the creation of a monoculture and subsequent reduction of structural diversity, was likely the cause of reduced avian diversity and richness due to a decrease in the availability of structurally oriented guilds. Advisors/Committee Members: Aborn, David A., Boyd, Jennifer N., Klug, Hope M., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Species diversity

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APA (6th Edition):

Hudson, A. (2013). Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/82

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hudson, Amelia. “Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 19, 2019. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/82.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hudson, Amelia. “Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee.” 2013. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Hudson A. Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/82.

Council of Science Editors:

Hudson A. Seasonal correlations between Pueraria montana var. lobata and avian species diversity and relative abundance in Hamilton County, Tennessee. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2013. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/82

2. Marsh, Laura. Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?.

Degree: 2015, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Many North American landbirds undergo biannual migration, which is energetically costly. Quality stopover sites are crucial to avian survival, as they provide opportunities to quickly replenish fat stores, rest, and avoid predation. One component of habitat quality that is often overlooked is the level of pedestrian activity, which birds interpret as potential predators. If intrusion levels are high, birds will flush readily and may not adequately restore energy reserves, which hinders successful migration. I compared body mass index between birds at different intrusion levels, testing the hypothesis that birds near continuous intrusion are less capable of replenishing body fat. Results between migratory guilds indicate long-distance migrants require areas of low intrusion to sufficiently acquire fat stores. In contrast, resident species are able to replenish body mass despite human intrusion. Since Neotropical migrants show increased sensitivity to human presence, conservation measures should focus on reducing pedestrian activity for quality stopover habitats. Advisors/Committee Members: Aborn, David A., Boyd, Jennifer N., Klug, Hope M., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Birds  – Migration; Migratory birds; Birds  – Ecology; Birds  – Conservation

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APA (6th Edition):

Marsh, L. (2015). Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/430

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marsh, Laura. “Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 19, 2019. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/430.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marsh, Laura. “Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?.” 2015. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Marsh L. Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/430.

Council of Science Editors:

Marsh L. Relationship of human intrusion on avian body mass: Do recreationists hinder birds’ abilities to acquire fat during migration?. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2015. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/430

3. Youngman, Holland. Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge.

Degree: 2017, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Declines in Neotropical migratory birds have been observed over the past several decades. Species with particular habitat needs, termed ‘specialists’, are especially at risk given continual habitat loss. These downward trends have prompted researchers to investigate species’ life histories and associated habitats to better understand the necessary components for successful life stages. The Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum; WEWA) is an interior specialist with little known regarding its post-fledging habitat needs. I used harness-attached radio transmitters to track fledgling WEWAs in the Tennessee River Gorge to study habitat components and daily movements. Results between fledgling location and random points indicate that degrees slope (gradient of a hillside) and leaf litter depth are significant characteristics of juvenile habitat, and that shrub density and herbaceous cover may also be determining factors. Daily movements averaged 49 linear meters and moved down slope. Additional studies will further reveal post-fledging needs and guide conservation actions. Advisors/Committee Members: Aborn, David A., Boyd, Jennifer N., Klug, Hope M., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Wood warblers; Birds  – Behavior  – North America

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Youngman, H. (2017). Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/538

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Youngman, Holland. “Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 19, 2019. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/538.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Youngman, Holland. “Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge.” 2017. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Youngman H. Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/538.

Council of Science Editors:

Youngman H. Post-fledging habitat use and movements of worm-eating warblers in the Tennessee River Gorge. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2017. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/538

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