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You searched for +publisher:"University of Tennessee – Chattanooga" +contributor:("Hood, Ralph W., Jr."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Swanson, Sally. Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases.

Degree: 2019, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Interreligious dialogue (IRD) is considered a sacred religious practice ([PCID], 2017; Merdjanova, 2016) and has become increasingly present in interventions to address conflict resulting from exposure to religious diversity (Cornille, 2013; Patel, 2018). However, few empirical efforts have examined the efficacy and outcomes of IRD. A grounded theory approach (Creswell & Poth, 2017) is well-suited to describe the nuanced role of religion in intergroup processes in major theoretical frameworks. Purposeful sampling (Patton, 2005) of 20 cases were selected from archival data of Faith Development Interviews (Streib & Keller, 2018) collected as part of the Developmental change in Spirituality project. Experiences of IRD were explored and analyzed through descriptions of instrumental cases and religious style scores. A thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) is used to identify common themes in IRD and the Religious Styles Perspective (Streib, 2001a). Implications of a theoretical framework for future research and application are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Hood, Ralph W., Jr., Ross, David F., Silver, Christopher F., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Religions  – Relations; Dialogue  – Religious aspects

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APA (6th Edition):

Swanson, S. (2019). Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/616

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swanson, Sally. “Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/616.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swanson, Sally. “Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases.” 2019. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Swanson S. Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/616.

Council of Science Editors:

Swanson S. Interreligious dialogue in the religious styles perspective: a qualitative analysis of instrumental cases. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2019. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/616

2. Mackey, Cameron. Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation.

Degree: 2019, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

The number of nonreligious Americans has increased over the past few decades; however negative attitudes toward the nonreligious persist in America, especially in areas with high levels of religiosity. This may compel some nonreligious individuals to conceal their identity in order to manage stigma in areas with high proportions of religious individuals. However, no existing measures systematically assess the concealment of nonreligious identity. To address this gap in the literature, I created a measure of concealment of nonreligious identity that I administered to nonreligious individuals from online sources. Participants who lived in the Southern United States were further assessed with semi-structured interviews. Results showed that Southern atheists/nonreligious individuals had higher concealment scores than participants from other regions of the United States. Additionally, Southern atheist/nonreligious individuals used the stigma management strategies of counterfeiting, avoidance, and integration. Implications for the role of social tension in psychological research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Hood, Ralph W., Jr., Watson, Paul J., Silver, Christopher F., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Secrecy  – Religious aspects; Identification (Religion)

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APA (6th Edition):

Mackey, C. (2019). Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/585

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mackey, Cameron. “Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/585.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mackey, Cameron. “Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation.” 2019. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Mackey C. Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/585.

Council of Science Editors:

Mackey C. Concealment of nonreligious identity: Scale construction and validation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2019. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/585

3. Durham, Matthew. Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact.

Degree: 2020, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Increasing political polarization in the United States over the last 60 years has led to an increase in self-segregation by political affiliation. This can be seen at the level of the nation, state, city, and even the neighborhood. In contrast, many data trends suggest that polarization between other groups (e.g., racial, ethnic, religious, sexual orientation) has decreased during the same time. One of the most studied methods for decreasing intergroup prejudice has been Gordon Allport’s intergroup contact hypothesis. Allport suggested that contact between groups who see themselves as equals with common interests, common goals, and the support of cultural institutions are more likely to reduce prejudice between said groups. But while this hypothesis has been extensively studied in a wide variety of contexts, precious few studies have done so in the context of political affiliation. This mixed methods study attempts to apply the lessons of other applications of Allport’s hypothesis to members of opposing political groups using direct one-on-one discussion between individuals in these groups and follow-up interviews. Qualitative and quantitative results suggest that participants were positive in their evaluation of each other and their discussion, and that it is likely that intergroup contact decreases political prejudice both immediately and 30 days after the discussion. Advisors/Committee Members: Hood, Ralph W., Jr.,, Silver, Christopher F., Rausch, David W., Black, Kristen J., College of Arts and Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Intergroup relations; Prejudices; Social interaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Durham, M. (2020). Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact. (Masters Thesis). University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Retrieved from https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/688

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Durham, Matthew. “Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/688.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Durham, Matthew. “Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact.” 2020. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Durham M. Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/688.

Council of Science Editors:

Durham M. Discerning the other: political prejudice and intergroup contact. [Masters Thesis]. University of Tennessee – Chattanooga; 2020. Available from: https://scholar.utc.edu/theses/688

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