Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of St. Andrews" +contributor:("Botting, Catherine"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of St. Andrews

1. Patterson, Veronica A. The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts .

Degree: 2012, University of St. Andrews

In this work, carbonaceous deposits on spent HTFT catalysts were investigated. This research was required in order to better understand the observed loss in productivity observed in the industrial reactors, with the aim of improving the economy of the HTFT process. A host of complementary techniques were employed to systematically determine the composition of a typical catalyst recovered from a reactor. Spent HTFT catalysts are comprised of magnetite and a mixture of iron carbides as well as adsorbed hydrocarbon products (soft carbon) and hard carbon. Reaction initiates at the particle surface and along the promoter-rich grain boundaries toward the core of the grains. A partially reacted particle would therefore have a core-shell structure, with magnetite representing the unreacted region of the catalyst. The reacted region consists of a porous carbonaceous matrix with soft carbon and carbide crystallites nestled in this matrix. The hard carbonaceous species is a mixture of polymeric carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The particle structure is linked to the sample preparation method and an alternative method yielding catalyst particle with uniformly distributed promoter elements could be beneficial. Investigating carbonaceous species is a complex process, and development of a fresh methodology would aid in the quest for insight into the nature of carbonaceous species in various systems. A new approach which entails a combination of the traditional techniques combined with MALDI-TOF MS enabled a deeper investigation. Additional aspects such as the molecular weight distributions along with known information about crystallinity and morphology of the catalyst provide a comprehensive study of carbonaceous material. Polymeric carbon and very large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons constitute hard carbon and can be observed with minimal sample preparation procedures. The evolution of the HTFT catalysts was investigated as a function of time-on-stream. This enabled us to study the effects of increasing amounts of hard carbon on the activity and the chemical and physical properties of the catalysts. The catalyst activity was found to decrease with increasing hard carbon content, although the effect of carbon deposition cannot be distinguished from phase transformation (oxidation) which occurs simultaneously. A method to quantify the amount of hard carbon, which progressively builds up on the catalyst, was demonstrated. This required a great deal of method development, which provides a platform for future investigations of these catalysts. Importantly, it allows predictions of the amounts of carbon that will be deposited after a certain reaction time. This allows more efficient regulation of catalyst replacement. The production of fine carbon-rich particles in the industrial reactor poses a major problem in the process. Carbon deposition leads to an increase in particle diameter with time on-stream. Permissible levels of hard carbon were identified, beyond which the mechanical strength of the catalyst… Advisors/Committee Members: Botting, Catherine (advisor), Webb, Paul P.W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Fischer-Tropsch synthesis; Carbon deposits; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Graphene; Catalyst deactivation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Patterson, V. A. (2012). The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts . (Thesis). University of St. Andrews. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3086

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Patterson, Veronica A. “The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts .” 2012. Thesis, University of St. Andrews. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3086.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Patterson, Veronica A. “The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts .” 2012. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Patterson VA. The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of St. Andrews; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3086.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Patterson VA. The effects of carbon deposition on catalyst deactivation in high temperature Fischer-Tropsch catalysts . [Thesis]. University of St. Andrews; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3086

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of St. Andrews

2. Carr, Sharon. Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins .

Degree: 2007, University of St. Andrews

The E1B55k gene in adenovirus type 5 was studied by generating recombinant viruses in which the E1B55k gene was N-terminally tagged with either a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) tag or a tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag. By infecting cells with the recombinant adenovirus expressing CFP tagged E1B55k, localisation of the E1B55k protein during infection could be studied. Generation of the recombinant viruses expressing TAP tagged E1B55k would allow purification of the E1B55k protein and any cellular or viral proteins that interacted with E1B55k. By infecting different cell types and harvesting at set time points during infection, the proteins interacting with E1B55k at different time points during infection could be identified. The E1B55k protein is modified by small ubiquitin modifying protein 1 (SUMO-1) at lysine residue 104 within the SUMO consensus sequence, and sumoylation can be abolished by mutating the lysine residue to an arginine (Endter et al, 2001). Therefore in order to study the effect of SUMOylation of E1B55k, on adenovirus infection, CFP and TAP tagged recombinant viruses in which the E1B55k protein was mutated to contain an unmodificable arginine at postion 104 were also generated. Stable cell lines expressing TAP tagged wild type E1B55k, and E1B55k in which lysine residue 104 had been mutated to an arginine were also generated as an alternative method to study the interacting proteins of E1B55k. Four different isoforms of SUMO have been identified, named SUMO1-4. Stable cell lines expressing SUMO-2 were infected with wild type adenovirus type 5 and harvested at set time points in order to determine if any adenoviral proteins were modified by SUMO-2. Advisors/Committee Members: Botting, Catherine (advisor), Hay, Ronald T (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Adenovirus; E1B55k; SUMO; Recombinant; Tandem affinity purification; TAP; CFP; Cyan fluorescent protein; Lysine to arginine mutation; SUMO consensus sequence

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carr, S. (2007). Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins . (Thesis). University of St. Andrews. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10023/219

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carr, Sharon. “Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins .” 2007. Thesis, University of St. Andrews. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/219.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carr, Sharon. “Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins .” 2007. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Carr S. Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of St. Andrews; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/219.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Carr S. Adenovirus and its interaction with host cell proteins . [Thesis]. University of St. Andrews; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/219

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.