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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Zhu, Feng"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Rhee, Eunice Yunjin. Essays on strategic categorization.

Degree: PhD, Business Administration, 2014, University of Southern California

This dissertation proposes the notion of strategic categorization and explores how organizations can strategically influence the categorization process of external audiences. Extant studies on categorization have shown that organizations that do not fit into an external audiences’ category structure are devalued. These studies, however, have not examined the role of organizations in influencing their categorization and thus have failed to develop an understanding of the categorization process that encompasses both the organization’s categorical sensegiving and audience’s categorical sensemaking. This dissertation helps to fill this gap by building on micro and macro perspectives of categorization and insights from the literature on organizational identity and identity management to argue that organizations can influence the categorization process of external audiences by engaging in self-categorization strategies. The first essay develops a theoretical framework for understanding the concept of and the process by which organizations can engage in strategic categorization. In particular, it argues that category studies need to investigate insights drawn from the vertical structure of categories in addition to the horizontal structure of categories that has been the focus of prior studies. The second essay empirically examines the effect of strategic categorization on audience’s evaluations. The results based on firms that had gone through the initial public offering (IPO) process demonstrate that organizations can manage the degree of category inclusiveness and range of category spanning to influence potential investors’ evaluation and that the effectiveness of such strategic categorization depends on the level of audience knowledge and the prevailing logic of valuation. Specifically, while the overall results suggest that changing category inclusiveness to take on a broader identity and changing category spanning to create a more focused identity are positively evaluated by IPO investors, they also show that institutional investors are influenced more by reducing the number of categories spanned, and retail investors are influenced more by increasing the degree of category inclusiveness. This dissertation considerably advances the categorization literature by revealing the role of organizational agency in the categorization process and ways in which organizations can engage in strategic categorization based on both vertical and horizontal structures of categories. Advisors/Committee Members: Fiss, Peer C. (Committee Chair), Rajagopalan, Nandini (Committee Member), Monge, Peter R. (Committee Member), Zhu, Feng (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: categories; strategic categorization; category inclusiveness; labels; initial public offering; IPO

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rhee, E. Y. (2014). Essays on strategic categorization. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/489529/rec/2479

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rhee, Eunice Yunjin. “Essays on strategic categorization.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 30, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/489529/rec/2479.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rhee, Eunice Yunjin. “Essays on strategic categorization.” 2014. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rhee EY. Essays on strategic categorization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/489529/rec/2479.

Council of Science Editors:

Rhee EY. Essays on strategic categorization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/489529/rec/2479


University of Southern California

2. Oh, Joo Hee. Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application.

Degree: PhD, Business Administration, 2011, University of Southern California

Digital technologies have transformed the traditional structure of production and promotion planning for new information goods. Studies, up to now, have examined implications of file sharing technologies on pricing schemes, protection mechanisms, and distribution strategies of digital contents. However, there is little understanding about the characteristics of piracy propagation process brought about by digital distribution technology. By drastically broadening behavioral options of search, consumption and reproduction of contents, IT-enabled tools may have reshaped conventional way of consumers’ engaging in new digital technologies and contents adoption decisions. In this dissertation, I seek to further our understanding of the impacts of the emergence of file sharing technology on consumers’ behavior in participating in digital piracy and how such changes brought about by new technology have altered the propagation dynamics of digital contents. I explore several questions regarding the dynamics of digital piracy propagation, influences of heterogeneous population segments on piracy propagation process, and the information role of digital piracy to improve business and policy decisions. My first research question characterizes the demand- and supply-side dynamics of piracy propagation and measures the effectiveness of anti-piracy efforts to curb digital piracy. My second question aims to identify different population segments and their inter-segment influences on piracy propagation. In my third research question, I utilize the consumers’ preference information in piracy data to improve market forecasting and promotional decisions. While the first research question characterizes the underlying dynamics of piracy propagation process per title at the aggregated level, the second research question identifies the influence of heterogeneous participants’ behavior on the propagation process. The study that addresses the third question is an application to utilize the propagation dynamics for the pre-release forecasting purposes. Overall, my research contributes to a better understanding of the economics of digital products, information products diffusion process, and the economics of digital piracy. Advisors/Committee Members: Hann, Il-HornEl Sawy, Omar (Committee Chair), James, Gareth (Committee Member), Zhu, Feng (Committee Member), Moon, Hyungsik Roger (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Information goods; piracy; new product diffusion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Oh, J. H. (2011). Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/623442/rec/5054

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oh, Joo Hee. “Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 30, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/623442/rec/5054.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oh, Joo Hee. “Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application.” 2011. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Oh JH. Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/623442/rec/5054.

Council of Science Editors:

Oh JH. Piracy propagation of information goods: theory, measurement and application. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/623442/rec/5054


University of Southern California

3. Derdenger, Timothy P. Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2009, University of Southern California

The focus of this dissertation is twofold. The first objective is to construct an empirical demand model for video game consoles which captures the complementary nature between hardware and software while accounting for software heterogeneity and competition. The second objective is to determine the effects of vertical integration on video game console price competition as well as consumer welfare and firm profits.; These objectives are answered with data from the 128 bit video game industry which consists of Nintendo Gamecube, Sony Playstation 2 and Microsoft Xbox. A new methodology is formed to estimate the demand for video game consoles. In order to understand how vertical integration impacts console price competition, my analysis extends the empirical industrial organization literature by constructing a new methodology which allows consumer demand for video game consoles to depend upon the set of available video games rather than only the number of games. The estimation technique differs from prior research by incorporating video game heterogeneity and software competition into the indirect network effect.; With the implementation of a model which is more flexible than prior models, I determine vertical integration in the video game industry increases price competition as well as consumer welfare and console manufacturer profits. There are two important trade-offs to vertical integration. The first is a demand effect which further differentiates consoles and forces prices higher. The second, a market structure effect, drives prices lower. Since price competition increases, the demand effect is thus dominated by the market structure effect which results in higher consumer welfare. Moreover, the increase in price competition also benefits console manufacturers. Lower prices generate greater demand for consoles which leads to a rise in the number of video games sold, where the "real" profits are made. I find that console makers are thus willing to set lower console prices in order to increase sales of their own developed video games. Under a more restrictive model, however, prices rise leading to the conclusion which is counter to what an industry insider would suspect. I determine that it is important to properly model the console manufacturers' profit functions and model the demand for video games well since console demand is derived from video game demand. Without doing so, incorrect policy conclusions are made. Advisors/Committee Members: Ridder, Geert (Committee Chair), Tan, Guofu (Committee Member), Goeree, Michelle (Committee Member), Zhu, Feng (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: vertical integration; two-sided markets; pricing; video game industry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Derdenger, T. P. (2009). Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/254257/rec/7827

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Derdenger, Timothy P. “Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 30, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/254257/rec/7827.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Derdenger, Timothy P. “Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry.” 2009. Web. 30 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Derdenger TP. Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 30]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/254257/rec/7827.

Council of Science Editors:

Derdenger TP. Vertical integration and two-sided market pricing: evidence from the video game industry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/254257/rec/7827

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