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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Williams, Diana"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Bibler, Justin Scott. The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912.

Degree: PhD, English, 2015, University of Southern California

From John Winthrop’s declaration that the English colony on the North American continent would be “as a city on a hill” to Lincoln’s discussion of the “great task remaining before us” in his Gettysburg Address, America has long seen itself more in terms of the future than of the past. This was perhaps never more the case than in the period surrounding the turn of the twentieth century. In the aftermath of the Civil War and Reconstruction, Americans faced a crisis of futurity, in which questions about the American citizenry going forward, and especially about the future of citizenship for African Americans, immigrants, and women, dominated public discourse. ❧ The Future Americans: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in American Utopian Fiction, 1888-1912 considers this intersection of futurity and citizenship by looking at an explicitly future‐oriented literary genre that, not‐coincidentally, rose to great prominence during this period: the literary utopia. Whereas much of the future‐oriented public discourse arose out of white Americans’ fears of racial amalgamation, cultural corruption, or the loss of white hegemony, utopian writers presented hopeful visions of the decades to come, in which the problems of the present are resolved and in which egalitarianism characterizes American economic and political life. As numerous critics have noted, however, the hopeful future‐visions of turn‐of‐the‐century utopian writers tended to preserve the exclusionary logic of Plessy v. Ferguson, the patriarchal notion of separate spheres, and the scientific racism of eugenics. Simply put, the American utopian novel at the turn of the twentieth century has been viewed, with some justification, as a racist and patriarchal genre; if the projected future in these novels is a utopia, it is a utopia for white, middle‐class men. But this does not tell the whole story, and one of the purposes of this dissertation is to recover the utopian voices of writers from groups with limited or second class citizenship. By beginning with Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward, the paradigmatic white, middle‐class utopian novel, and then looking at three utopian re‐visions by writers from oppressed groups—Edward A. Johnson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Sui Sin Far—my dissertation argues that utopianism served an important role within the activist programs of African American, Chinese American, and feminist writers. Since my dissertation focuses on the utility of utopian writing, I also uncover the compromises and hypocrisies within these works that resulted from the authors’ competing desires both to illustrate an objectively better future and to avoid alienating readers whose support was crucial the author’s activist agenda. Finally, my dissertation demonstrates that turn‐of‐the‐century evolutionary thought, often associated with the oppressiveness and racism of the eugenics movement and anti‐miscegenation legislation, also played an integral role in the utopian theorizing of women and people of color. Advisors/Committee Members: Rowe, John Carlos (Committee Chair), Handley, William R. (Committee Member), Williams, Diana I. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; citizenship; utopian literature; future; eugenics; African American literature; Chinese American literature; Edward Bellamy; Edward A. Johnson; Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Sui Sin Far

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APA (6th Edition):

Bibler, J. S. (2015). The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/594954/rec/6745

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bibler, Justin Scott. “The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 03, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/594954/rec/6745.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bibler, Justin Scott. “The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912.” 2015. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Bibler JS. The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/594954/rec/6745.

Council of Science Editors:

Bibler JS. The future Americans: race, gender, and citizenship in American utopian fiction, 1888-1912. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/594954/rec/6745


University of Southern California

2. DeClue, Jennifer Michelle. Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness.

Degree: PhD, American Studies and Ethnicity, 2017, University of Southern California

Specters of Miscegenation: Blood, Belonging, and the Reproduction of Blackness examines the manner in which ideologies of black women’s reproductive lives permeate antebellum anti‐miscegenation legislation, then resurface and circulate through postbellum Jim Crow laws, as well as historic and contemporary visual and literary cultural texts. By tuning in to the specter of black women’s reproduction in the making of the racialized U.S. body this project hones in on the gray areas—the ambiguities of race, family, and community—that anti‐miscegenation legislation and Jim Crow laws attempt to disaggregate. This project pays particular attention to the ways that black women’s bodies become vectors through which symbolics of blood, that are rooted in scientific racism, circulate through literary and visual culture in postbellum generations. I look to cultural texts that contend with anti‐black vigilante violence and lynching, “mulatto” children’s rights of inheritance, interracial couple’s right to marry, and domestic spaces that clandestinely merge black and white bodies, then I examine the archival documents and key legal cases that arise directly or exist in the backgrounds of these texts. ❧ The central visual or literary text analyzed in each chapter of Specters of Miscegenation responds to a moment in history in which issues arising from anti‐miscegenation law, anti‐black violence, or enslavement dominate the American landscape. I examine different aspects of the impact that anti‐miscegenation laws have had on black women’s reproduction, as well as ways that anti‐miscegenation laws were codified in response to black women’s reproduction of “mulatto” and ostensibly white but legally enslaved children. The imposed upon “mulatto” and black mother figures who surface in the cultural texts that I examine have to contend with the repercussions of committing the crime of miscegenation, whether by force or consent, and thereby deny white supremacy’s claim to blood purity in the film Pinky (1949) and the documentary film The Loving Story (2011). This project also examines miscegenation by discussing communities of black and white people that violently occupy the same space during the volatile post Civil War era south in Kara Walker’s Bureau of Refugees series (2008), and conversely how a “miscegenated” collectivity attains freedom by using the group to defy the systemic racial and gendered violence of chattel slavery in Sherley Anne Williams's novel Dessa Rose (1986). ❧ This project looks closely at the affective dimensions of belonging by attending to the complex of secrecy, shame, and violence engendered by miscegenated and miscegenating bodies. I focus on ways that black mothers and “mulatto” women threaten discrete racial and classed boundaries as their reproductive bodies expose the sanguine entanglement between black/white and enslaved/slaveholding communities. The cultural texts that I examine illustrate how generations of sexual violence, subsequent familial ties, and racially indistinct collectivities blur putatively… Advisors/Committee Members: Keeling, Kara (Committee Chair), Halberstam, Jack (Committee Member), Shah, Nayan (Committee Member), Williams, Diana (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: spectrality; Black reproductivity; chattel slavery; symbolics of blood; sanguinity; Jim Crow; Loving v Virginia; Sally Hemings; haunting; visuality; Black feminist studies; miscegenation; anti-miscegenation law; cultural studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

DeClue, J. M. (2017). Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/577108/rec/6001

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DeClue, Jennifer Michelle. “Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 03, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/577108/rec/6001.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DeClue, Jennifer Michelle. “Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness.” 2017. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

DeClue JM. Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2017. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/577108/rec/6001.

Council of Science Editors:

DeClue JM. Specters of miscegenation: blood, belonging, and the reproduction of blackness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2017. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/577108/rec/6001


University of Southern California

3. Hakim, Andrew Mark. Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel.

Degree: PhD, English, 2009, University of Southern California

Fictions of Representation examines the ways literary, political, and social processes of representation operated in constructing a specific national history of being, subjectivity, and citizenship in the interwar era United States. I draw a parallel between a shifting national story of representation during this time period and the proliferation of novels where the story of a central figure pursuing the American dream is related through the eyes of another character – a character who seemingly stands for the protagonist and represents his or her tale to readers. Exploring the complex narrative strategies employed by novels such F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Nella Larsen’s Passing, and Willa Cather’s My Ántonia, I link literary technique and political representation to highlight the tension between having the right to be autonomous and free, yet at the same time having one’s interests represented by another. Connecting narrative structure and interwar era concerns over representation and American character and identity, I uncover a growing distrust toward and crisis in confidence in both representative democracy and representations of “Americanness.” More specifically, I theorize that the increased appearance of novels such as Gatsby, Passing, and My Ántonia in the years between the wars reflects national apprehension about changes in the shape and scope of political representation in the U.S., and is in direct proportion to a concomitant increase in anxieties over what it meant to be “American” as the nation grappled with acute dislocation fostered by immigration, industrialization, woman’s suffrage, race and labor strife, political radicalism, and global war.; Through a critical remapping of work by Fitzgerald, Larsen, Cather, Robert Penn Warren, William Faulkner, and Budd Schulberg, I consider the troubled ethical implications of a democracy that supposedly cares for those who are ruled, yet frequently denies its citizens full equality and meaningful voice. Although the writers in my study were not, for the most part, radical in their politics, I suggest that their texts, when placed in context with each other and with their era, elucidate how the act of relying on one person to represent someone else, whether in literature or in politics, can create a comfort with the act of appropriation that leads to cultural dominance. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplan, Carla (Committee Chair), Rowe, John Carlos (Committee Member), Williams, Diana (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: representation; American literature; politics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hakim, A. M. (2009). Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/276311/rec/2803

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hakim, Andrew Mark. “Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 03, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/276311/rec/2803.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hakim, Andrew Mark. “Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel.” 2009. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Hakim AM. Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/276311/rec/2803.

Council of Science Editors:

Hakim AM. Fictions of representation: narrative and the politics of self-making in the interwar American novel. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/276311/rec/2803

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