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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Terriquez, Veronica"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Mendez, Matthew Synclair. In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants.

Degree: PhD, Politics and International Relations, 2016, University of Southern California

Traditional mechanisms of legislative accountability have largely stressed the importance of sanction-based models of representation. Such models are largely premised on the assumption that legislators are responsive to constituents in order to ensure their reelection. This dissertation asks the question of what kinds of representation are necessary for the representation of undocumented immigrants, a group that is structurally barred from the franchise. ❧ An overwhelming majority of undocumented immigrants are Latinos and over the last decade they have mobilized forcefully to advocate for their rights. As such, this dissertation specifically asks what mechanism of accountability serves as the link between descriptive representation and substantive representation in regards to undocumented Latino immigrants. The dissertation substantively engages with the question of how to represent individuals with multiple identities and subsequently looks to intersectionality theory for possible answers. ❧ This dissertation utilizes a multi-method approach to investigate these research questions. In Chapter 2, I review the literature on representation and offer a theory on how the insights of intersectionality theory can help scholars understand the representation of undocumented immigrants. Field experiments are utilized in Chapters 3 and 4 to assess whether state legislators provide representation for undocumented immigrants. My results show that legislators do provide some representation for undocumented immigrants, but are generally more responsive to citizens. In Chapter 3, specifically, there is evidence to suggest that Latino legislators do provide equitable representation for undocumented Latino immigrants. Chapter 5 utilizes semi- structured, in-depth interviews with immigrant rights advocates to illustrate how these advocates built relationships with state legislators to act affirmatively on behalf of undocumented immigrants. The results show that descriptive representation along the lines of ethnicity is a possible route to representation, but that it can be mediated by electoral factors. Advisors/Committee Members: Hancock, Ange-Marie (Committee Chair), Grose, Christian R. (Committee Member), Terriquez, Veronica (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: representation; undocumented immigrants; Latino politics; field experiments; empirical intersectionality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mendez, M. S. (2016). In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/622883/rec/3439

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mendez, Matthew Synclair. “In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/622883/rec/3439.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mendez, Matthew Synclair. “In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants.” 2016. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Mendez MS. In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/622883/rec/3439.

Council of Science Editors:

Mendez MS. In/visible constituents: the representation of undocumented immigrants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2016. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/622883/rec/3439


University of Southern California

2. Serrano, Orlando R. Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas.

Degree: PhD, American Studies and Ethnicity, 2014, University of Southern California

Colonial Brews: Café and Power in the Américas examines coffee trade in the Américas generally, and between the U.S. and Nicaragua specifically, to see how unequal and colonial power is produced and maintained in a region. It is a geo‐historical study that combines archival research, policy analysis, and ethnographic fieldwork methods with critical spatial and critical ethnic studies theories. Primary sources include nineteenth century U.S. canal project papers, coffee trade journals and agreements, GATT and WTO agreements, and fair trade materials. I also analyze the accounting archives of La Hammonia coffee plantation in Nicaragua in addition to conducting interviews and completing participant observation on‐site. Colonial Brews combines these sources to answer key research questions. How do the production, retail, and consumption of coffee broadly and between the U.S. and Nicaragua specifically reveal the persistence of colonial power? What shapes do the control over the economic, political, civic, and epistemic take in a particular global commodity chain? Who are the actors involved in delineating the contours of—whether in a dominant or marginal role—production, retail, and consumption in a coffee commodity chain between the U.S. and Nicaragua? How are different crises—of surplus, of price drops, of infrastructure, of war—resolved? How do the resolutions inhibit or engender alternative forms of interdependence? Over the course of the dissertation it becomes evident that tracing the history of a coffee commodity chain between the U.S. and Nicaragua reveals colonial power at work that is structured by what Walter Mignolo calls the logic of coloniality (2005). In each instance, the resolutions to crises work to reproduce colonial power and extend the reach of coloniality. In the end, the colonial interdependence made between people and places across space in this context can only be undone through anti‐colonial practices that form a diverse assault across the spectrum of political, economic, and social life in the service of refashioning global connection. This is all the more urgent at a moment in which political, economic, and social acts are binding people and places together with increasing intimacy. We must join in the work of many who are trying to make another kind of interdependence that is more equitable and life‐sustaining. To make it based on mutuality. ❧ Colonial Brews contributes to scholarship on processes of globalization and transnationalism in Critical Geography, (Transnational) American Studies, Transnational Sociology and Latino Studies. It builds on the work of geographers, sociologists, and anthropologists who use political economy and commodity chains to study the production of power at a regional or global scale by approaching them from the anti‐colonial perspective of critical ethnic studies. In so doing it presents an analysis that is not couched solely in class terms, but one that sees class, ethnicity, race, and gender differences as mutually constituted and made simultaneously through… Advisors/Committee Members: Pulido, Laura (Committee Chair), Gilmore, Ruth Wilson (Committee Member), Gómez-Barris, Macarena (Committee Member), Gomez-Barris, Macarena (Committee Member), Terriquez, Veronica (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: critical geography; globalization; food studies; Latin American Studies; political economy; ethnography; anticolonial; transnationalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Serrano, O. R. (2014). Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/412762/rec/1450

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Serrano, Orlando R. “Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/412762/rec/1450.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Serrano, Orlando R. “Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas.” 2014. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Serrano OR. Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/412762/rec/1450.

Council of Science Editors:

Serrano OR. Colonial brews: café and power in the Américas. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/412762/rec/1450


University of Southern California

3. Estrada, Emir. Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2014, University of Southern California

This dissertation is the first study to look at the participation of children in a Latino racialized and gendered informal occupation in Los Angeles—street vending. Relying on qualitative methods, including 66 interviews with parent and child street vendors, two and half years of participant observation and ten months of in-depth shadowing with five street vending families, this dissertation addresses four research questions. How do children contribute to their immigrant parents' street vending business and household economy? How do the children experience and evaluate the many different job tasks they do in street vending? What are the intergenerational dynamics that emerge when children work alongside their immigrant parents? How do these children balance their street vending work and school responsibilities, and what educational and occupational aspirations do they hold? ❧ This dissertation demonstrates that the children of Latino street vendors in Los Angeles play an important role in their family’s social and economic incorporation. The first part of this dissertation shows that children enter this racialized immigrant occupation as a result of their parents’ accumulated disadvantage, including their undocumented status, lack of employment opportunities in the formal sector of the economy, and the negative context of reception. ❧ Informed by the sociology of childhood and intersectionality theories, this study contributes to the knowledge of working class Latino immigrant families in the United States and prompts a re-visioning of segmented assimilation theory. This dissertation suggests that working together with la familia serves as a buffer against dissonant acculturation and downward assimilation. This research focuses on the processes of family work relations and reveals that the youth’s work with their family provides financial resources for the family and the children; sets the context for children to actively use their American generational resources to help their parents and themselves; increases parental control and child agency and; strengthens family bonds as children develop an economic empathy with their parents. These findings broaden our understanding of childhood. The work experience of these young vendors demonstrates that in contemporary U.S. society, multiple variants of childhood need not result in pathology, downward social mobility or other negative outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette (Committee Chair), Suro, Roberto (Committee Member), Vallejo, Jody Agius (Committee Member), Terriquez, Veronica (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: childhood; street vending; immigration; segmented assimilation theory; the second generation; informal economy; family and work; intersectionality.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Estrada, E. (2014). Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/76586/rec/7973

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Estrada, Emir. “Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/76586/rec/7973.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Estrada, Emir. “Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles.” 2014. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Estrada E. Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/76586/rec/7973.

Council of Science Editors:

Estrada E. Working with la familia: a study of family work relations among Latina/o children and adolescents who work with their parents as street vendors in Los Angeles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/76586/rec/7973

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