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University of Southern California

1. Kalantari, Arash. Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity.

Degree: Doctor of Policy, Planning & Development, Policy, Planning and Development, 2014, University of Southern California

Globalization has shaped the form of contemporary urbanism. A well-conserved historic city has to be defined by certain empirical measurements: it must have influence across borders and natural barriers; it must be part of a network of commerce and communication; it must function as a management center for various global economic operations. There is no such thing as an isolated city in today urban life; a city is always part of a network of other cities. Given this situation, issues of hierarchy and interdependence, especially in the economic processes of global economy. ❧ The tension between the working, contemporary city and the integration with the traditional city is a focal point in all efforts at conservation. Traditional buildings are, however, adaptable and flexible enough to find a way into the modern functional city. The older forms are not strictly incompatible. Architectural fieldwork has documented the usage of exterior facades, the interior and exterior conditions of those facades, the level and preservation of the finished materials, and various conditions of the interior spaces and the condition of such municipal utilities as water, electricity, and sewage. On top of that, a determination must be made on the economic viability of such buildings. Determinations must be made of current and recent occupancy rates, the types of people who live in those dwellings, and the costs of maintenance and repair. In the effort to keep traditional structures and living patterns relevant to modern conditions, preservation efforts must make recommendations on how to improve the image of core urban environments. ❧ We need to reconsider the nature of preservation policies, enrich current practices, and envision an alternative to those practices. As urban environments have become more dynamic and open to change, public policy experts have had to confront the need for the protection of traditional buildings, sections of modern cities, and even whole cities and regions. We have the resources, but we lack the political will to accept the responsibility implied by our situation. We must act now to halt the destruction of our precious cultural, urban heritage. If we allow the historic artifact to vanish from our contemporary horizon, we also surrender our cultural memory, our identity, and the beauty revealed by our ancestors. We can return a sense of belonging to our communities which are threatened by the expansion of contemporary development trends which disguise their destructive nature by claiming to be on the frontier of aesthetics and urbanism. We need an alternative. We have sixty years of experience in urban conservation to support this alternative direction, and there is no reason to downsize our ambitions and be fearful of diminishing the ultimate prospects of our urban living. We are capable of implementing a comprehensive recovery plan orchestrated by trans-national institutions, federal and local leaders, and wiser use of private and public investment with the widest possible participation of stakeholders. Due… Advisors/Committee Members: Banerjee, Tridib K. (Committee Chair), Steele, James M. (Committee Member), Campbell, Regula (Committee Member), Campbell, Douglas (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: historic cities; Middle East; globalization; urban conservation; policy and planning; cultural heritage; adaptive reuse; Aga Khan Historic Cities Program

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kalantari, A. (2014). Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/485954/rec/7715

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kalantari, Arash. “Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/485954/rec/7715.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kalantari, Arash. “Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity.” 2014. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Kalantari A. Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/485954/rec/7715.

Council of Science Editors:

Kalantari A. Urban conservation in the Middle Eastern historic cities: globalization and lack of identity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/485954/rec/7715

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