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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Rose, Adam Z."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Prager, Fynnwin. The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states.

Degree: PhD, Policy, Planning and Development, 2013, University of Southern California

This dissertation examines the economic and political impacts of climate policy across U.S. households, sectors and states. This dissertation is motivated by three themes that dominate climate policy: change, inequality, and uncertainty. The impacts of future climate changes are uncertain. Precautionary government intervention can be justified given the potentially catastrophic outcomes of climate change, especially for the most vulnerable communities. However, there is concern that climate policy changes would substantially burden the economy, and inequitably impact the poorest households and regions by reducing income and purchasing power, and by creating more difficult transitions to new green jobs. This dissertation analyzes the economic impacts of a U.S. federal ETP, a market-based approach used by governments worldwide to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Computable general equilibrium modeling is used to estimate the distributional economic impacts across U.S. household income groups and states. ETP can be designed to alleviate regulatory burdens on specific sectors, states, or income brackets; this dissertation compares the economic impacts of numerous policy design options. Uncertainty over climate change has also contributed to an increasingly contentious political debate over policy. This dissertation examines the influence of state-level computable general equilibrium results, as well as other state-level economic indicators, on Congressional climate policy voting. Advisors/Committee Members: Painter, Gary Dean (Committee Chair), Rose, Adam Z. (Committee Member), Sellers, Jefferey M. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: climate policy; computable general equilibrium modeling; economic impacts; income distribution; political economy; regional equity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prager, F. (2013). The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/246338/rec/6590

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prager, Fynnwin. “The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/246338/rec/6590.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prager, Fynnwin. “The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states.” 2013. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Prager F. The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/246338/rec/6590.

Council of Science Editors:

Prager F. The economic and political impacts of U.S. federal carbon emissions trading policy across households, sectors and states. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/246338/rec/6590


University of Southern California

2. Dormady, Noah Christopher. Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets.

Degree: PhD, Policy, Planning and Development, 2012, University of Southern California

Chapter 1: A Monte Carlo Approach ❧ The use of auctions to distribute tradeable property rights to firms in already heavily concentrated markets may further exacerbate the problems of market power that exist within those markets. This chapter provides a model of a two-stage emissions market modeled after a contemporary regional permit trading market in the United States, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, Inc. (RGGI). It then introduces Oligopsony 1.0, a C# software package constructed in the .NET environment that simulates uniform-price auctions using stochastic Monte Carlo simulation for modeling market power in tradeable property rights auctions. Monte Carlo methods add a probabilistic element to standard auction theoretic equilibria. The results of these simulations indicate that there can be significant non-linearities between profit and market power as exercised through strategic demand reduction. This analysis finds the optimum point of strategic demand reduction that enables the firm to exploit these non-linearities, and it determines the probability distributions of these optima using kernel density analysis. ❧ Chapter 2: An Experimental Approach ❧ How will emerging auction-based emissions markets function within the context of today’s deregulated auction-based electricity markets? This chapter provides an experimental analysis of a joint energy-emissions market. The impact of market power and collusion among dominant firms is evaluated to determine the extent to which an auction-based tradeable permit market influences performance in an adjacent electricity market. The experimental treatment design controls for a variety of real-world institutional features, including variable demand, permit banking, inter-temporal (multi-round) dynamics, a tightening cap, and resale. Results suggest that the exercise of market power significantly increases electricity auction clearing prices, without significantly increasing emissions auction clearing prices, and in some cases, even significantly suppresses them. The institution of auction-based carbon markets in the already-concentrated energy sector can further strengthen the market position of dominant firms who can leverage energy-emissions market linkages to their operational advantage. ❧ Chapter 3: Regulatory Mechanisms and Policy Approaches ❧ Contemporary deregulated electricity markets are defined by a complex array of multi-settlement markets, with additional market-based mechanisms designed, to a large extent, to limit the exercise of market power by dominant firms. On top of the already complex nature of these markets, policymakers are also adding market-based mechanisms to curtail greenhouse gases. Key linkages exist between electricity and emissions markets that may be utilized by dominant firms. This chapter provides an analysis of three specific policy mechanisms that are utilized in contemporary markets to effectively reduce the incentive of dominant firms to exercise market power. These include convergence bidding, consignment auctions and multilevel… Advisors/Committee Members: Mazmanian, Daniel A. (Committee Chair), Rose, Adam Z. (Committee Member), Jurewitz, John (Committee Member), Wilkie, Simon J. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: emissions markets; power markets; electricity markets; market power; oligopoly; oligopsony; monopoly; monopsony; cap-and-trade; cap and trade; Monte Carlo; human experiments; economics experiments; laboratory experiments; experimental economics; environmental economics; energy economics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dormady, N. C. (2012). Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/50005/rec/2309

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dormady, Noah Christopher. “Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/50005/rec/2309.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dormady, Noah Christopher. “Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets.” 2012. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Dormady NC. Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/50005/rec/2309.

Council of Science Editors:

Dormady NC. Emissions markets, power markets and market power: a study of the interactions between contemporary emissions markets and deregulated electricity markets. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/50005/rec/2309


University of Southern California

3. Zhou, Jie. Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis.

Degree: Doctor of Policy, Planning & Development, Policy, Planning and Development, 9, University of Southern California

This dissertation examines the theoretical roots of index decomposition analysis (IDA), fills in some key gaps, extends this method, and applies it to three cases to provide policy and planning insights. IDA is a widely used tool in energy use and pollutant emissions studies to estimate the directions and magnitude of the driving forces of a change in a key economic variable. The usefulness of index decomposition analysis resides in the fact that policy makers and planners sometimes need a way to distinguish how one factor affects a certain change of interest at the macro level when the change is a combined effect of multiple factors on a group of items. IDA can separate the contributions of drivers to the explained variable change and can aggregate the effects at the group level. Therefore, it provides a quantitative way to reveal the significance of drivers to a change and can help policy makers and planners develop remedies where necessary. ❧ This dissertation consists of six chapters. The theoretical foundation and nearly a century of studies on index numbers were summarized briefly in Chapter 1 and in detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 1 also describes how this dissertation is organized. By reviewing the history and recent developments in index numbers and IDA, I identified several remaining issues and proposed a new approach to generate multi-factor multilateral index numbers. I discussed the issue of consistencies in the ranking of factors between multiplicative IDAs and their additive counterparts. I also united both the widely-used Laspeyres-based and Divisia-based index numbers under the framework of discrete approximation of Divisia index, which has the advantage to identify the source of differences across index numbers and to reveal the link between the multiplicative index numbers and their additive counterparts. ❧ Index numbers were first studied in the field of wealth and income to obtain the price level and quantity level changes between multiple time periods and/or areas. Major contributions include the derivation of index number formulas/approaches, the meaning of index numbers, and their connections with economic theory (see, e.g. Fisher, 1922; Samuelson & Swamy, 1974; Diewert, 1976; van Veelen & van de Weide, 2008). IDA can be seen as the extension of index number theory to the field of energy use and pollutant emissions, in which the number of explanatory factors usually exceeds two. Major contributions in IDA include the extension of the index numbers to the new field, the derivation of multi-factor index number formulas, the introduction of additive decomposition, and the derivation of the additive counterparts of multiplicative index number formulas (see, e.g., Ang, 1994; Ang, 2004; Sun, 1997). ❧ We identified multi-factor multilateral IDA as a gap in the literature and suggested that the Shapley value can be used to derive transitive multilateral index numbers. The transitivity is ensured by obtaining one value for each area first and obtaining the multilateral index numbers by using the quotient… Advisors/Committee Members: Rose, Adam Z. (Committee Chair), Tang, Shui Yan (Committee Member), Nugent, Jeffrey B. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: environmental changes; index decomposition analysis; Shapley value; Fisher ideal index; EKS index; LMDI; multilateral index

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, J. (9). Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/472989/rec/4001

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Jie. “Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis.” 9. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed December 05, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/472989/rec/4001.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Jie. “Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis.” 9. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhou J. Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 9. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/472989/rec/4001.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou J. Measuring the drivers of economic, energy, and environmental changes: an index decomposition analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 9. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/472989/rec/4001

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