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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Musick, Kelly"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Hagedorn, Aaron Timothy. Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000.

Degree: PhD, Gerontology, 2008, University of Southern California

The purpose of this dissertation was to examine trends in active life expectancy between the mid 1980s and the late 1990s, and to examine changes in disability onset, recovery, and mortality in different subgroups of the population. Two nationally representative longitudinal datasets of the population ages 70 and older were used to examine an incidence-based measure of disability in a multi-state life table program known as IMaCh.; The results suggest that there was a slight increase in active life expectancy between age-matched individuals in the 1990s relative to their counterparts in the 1980s, with gains unequal across subgroups. For example, males in the 1990s showed clear gains in years expected active relative to their 1987 counterparts. No change over time was observed for females. Larger gains in active life expectancy were observed for the white population than the black population over the same time period. There are some signs, however, that differences in disability onset by race may be gradually declining, as rates on disability onset appear to be falling slightly in the black population. There are no differences between blacks and whites in theprobability of recovery from disability, and only slight differences in the probability of mortality.; Clear differences in disability onset and total and active life expectancy were observed between those with less than 12 years of education compared to those with 12 or more years of education. Individuals in the higher education group had life expectancies about 2 years longer than those of the same age with less than 12 years of education. There appears to be no convergence over time between the education groups, as neither the lower nor higher education group showed any change in active life expectancy over the time period.; The results suggest that overall there may be a slight compression of disability in the overall population of the U.S. between 1984 and 2000, however, most of the improvements are observed for males and the white population. Continued improvements may be observed if minorities and lower educated groups can gradually reduce the gap in disability incidence and mortality. Advisors/Committee Members: Crimmins, Eileen M. (Committee Chair), Wilber, Kathleen H. (Committee Member), Musick, Kelly (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: active life expectancy; longitudinal; trends; disability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hagedorn, A. T. (2008). Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/64016/rec/3872

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hagedorn, Aaron Timothy. “Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/64016/rec/3872.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hagedorn, Aaron Timothy. “Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000.” 2008. Web. 22 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hagedorn AT. Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. [cited 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/64016/rec/3872.

Council of Science Editors:

Hagedorn AT. Longitudinal change in active life expectancy: the longitudinal studies of aging 1984-2000. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/64016/rec/3872


University of Southern California

2. Zimmermann, Anke C. Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2007, University of Southern California

The three essays in this dissertation share in common an attempt to study the effect on subjective well-being of psychological processes along with objective conditions traditionally emphasized in economics.; Do people adapt rapidly and completely to marriage as a recent study of German data concludes? I analyze the role of adaptation ­ i.e whether people fairly quickly revert to their previous level of well-being ­ following the formation of partnerships using the German Socio-Economic Panel. On average, marriage has a lasting impact on life satisfaction, equal in magnitude to the effect of cohabitation prior to marriage. The findings do not support the popular notion in psychology that individuals always revert to a set level of happiness no matter how life circumstances change.; Does financial satisfaction only depend on income? In the second essay, I explore the determinants of financial satisfaction, including not only income but also the impact of assets and liabilities. Financial satisfaction steadily increases over the life cycle, whereas household income shows an inverted U-pattern with a peak at midlife. While income has the expected positive relation, increasing financial satisfaction at older age can be partly explained by decreases in liabilities and increases in financial assets. In addition, reduction in the dependency burden at old age leads to increased financial satisfaction while the deterioration of health has a negative impact.; Is adaptation different with regard to economic and non-economic circumstances? In thelast essay I analyze differences in the life cycle patterns of aspirations and attainments in the pecuniary and non-pecuniary domains. Pecuniary aspirations ­ i.e. aspirations for material goods continue to increase over the life course, whereas non pecuniary aspirations ­ i.e. aspirations for family, work and health ­ remain constant or decline. The implication is that the steady increase in pecuniary aspirations can undermine the pursuit of happiness. In contrast, aspirations with regards to marriage do not increase; a finding which supports the results of the first essay that marriage has a lasting effect on well-being. The empirical analysis is based on responses to Roper surveys on the "good life". Advisors/Committee Members: Easterlin, Richard A. (Committee Chair), Kuran, Timur (Committee Member), Musick, Kelly (Committee Member), Nugent, Jeffrey B. (Committee Member), Silverstein, Merril (Committee Member), Tan, Guofu (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: subjective well-being; adaptation; aspirations; financial satisfaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zimmermann, A. C. (2007). Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/323212/rec/509

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zimmermann, Anke C. “Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/323212/rec/509.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zimmermann, Anke C. “Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being.” 2007. Web. 22 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zimmermann AC. Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/323212/rec/509.

Council of Science Editors:

Zimmermann AC. Adaptation, assets, and aspiration. Three essays on the economics of subjective well-being. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/323212/rec/509

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