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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Kim, Namkil"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Jeon, Seonkyung. Second language acquisition of Korean progressive.

Degree: PhD, East Asian Languages & Cultures, 2011, University of Southern California

This dissertation examines second language (L2) acquisition of the Korean progressive by native English speakers and native Japanese speakers. We investigate frist language (L1) transfer and form-to-meaning mapping, focusing on the acquisition of two possible interpretations of the Korean progressive.; In English, Japanese and Korean, the progressives interact differently with the lexical aspect of the verb. The English progressive encodes the ongoing interpretation, whereas the Japanese and Korean progressives encode not only the resultative interpretation but also the ongoing interpretation. Based on these crosslinguistic differences, we assume that learners start with their L1 in acquiring aspectual semantics and predict that L1-English learners and L1-Japanese learners show different acquisitional patterns. Furthermore, we predict that L1-English learners restructure native form-to-meaning mapping based on positive input. This dissertation investigates these issues by testing adult English speakers and Japanese speakers of various proficiency levels. In the experiments two main tasks were used: the Story Completion Task and the Truth Value Judgment Task.; The results of the tasks revealed that L1-English learners acquire the ongoing interpretation of the progressive –ko iss earlier than the resultative interpretation. However, L1-Japanese learners performed similarly on the ongoing interpretation of the progressive –ko iss and the resultative interpretation. The results suggest L1 transfer effects in acquiring the progressive, ruling out the universal developmental order, that is, prototype-based explanation. The results of the study of L1-English learners indicate that L2 learners could restructure form-to-meaning mapping based on positive input.; However, acquisition of the resultative interpretation gradually occurred with individual variations. Advisors/Committee Members: Kim, Namkil (Committee Chair), Li, Audrey Yen-Hui (Committee Member), Silva-Corvalan, Carmen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: second language acquisition; Korean progressive; aspect

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jeon, S. (2011). Second language acquisition of Korean progressive. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/451270/rec/5737

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jeon, Seonkyung. “Second language acquisition of Korean progressive.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/451270/rec/5737.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jeon, Seonkyung. “Second language acquisition of Korean progressive.” 2011. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Jeon S. Second language acquisition of Korean progressive. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/451270/rec/5737.

Council of Science Editors:

Jeon S. Second language acquisition of Korean progressive. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/451270/rec/5737


University of Southern California

2. Le, Giang Ha. Vietnamese sentence final particles.

Degree: MA, East Asian Languages and Cultures, 2015, University of Southern California

This work presents a thorough description of Vietnamese sentence final particles, including their pragmatic usages and core meanings. In total, the paper investigates 28 primary particles and 45 dialectal variants that appear in sentence final position. A few sub-syllabic meaningful units such as [+high] tones, initial consonants đ, k, h, and nasals, are also identified. This description leads to categorization of the particles into 4 major groups: the clausal typing particles, the deitic particles, the aspectual particles, and the discourse markers. An investigation into the hierarchical order of the particles suggests that the order of functional projections in CP domain is DiscourseP>MoodInformativeP>MoodEvalP>DeikP1> DeikP2>ForceP. This order would suggest that in Vietnamese the discourse domain (DiscourseP) is higher than propositional domain (DeikP) which is then higher than the sentential (ForceP) domain. The paper also explores syntactic analyses for three particles in particular: không, chưa, and đâu. The proposed derivation for NPQ involving the first two particles is that: không is base-generated in Neg and move to C for SFP interpretation, whereas chưa is base-generated in C and does not undergo movement. This work also provides support to an analysis where đâu is not a wh-word in a NWC but is simply a head in ForceP. Advisors/Committee Members: Simpson, Andrew (Committee Chair), Li, Audrey (Committee Member), Hayden, George (Committee Member), Kim, Namkil (Committee Member), Hoskins, Janet A. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: descriptive linguistics; syntax; particles; head directionality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Le, G. H. (2015). Vietnamese sentence final particles. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/536491/rec/7834

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Le, Giang Ha. “Vietnamese sentence final particles.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/536491/rec/7834.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Le, Giang Ha. “Vietnamese sentence final particles.” 2015. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Le GH. Vietnamese sentence final particles. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/536491/rec/7834.

Council of Science Editors:

Le GH. Vietnamese sentence final particles. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/536491/rec/7834


University of Southern California

3. Kim, Dong Hee. A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors.

Degree: MA, East Asian Languages & Cultures, 2009, University of Southern California

This paper reports on a descriptive study that analyzes high-intermediate Korean heritage learners' use of Korean 'Noun-Verb'lexical collocations, which was investigated through translation tasks. First, the KFL learners' productive and comprehensive knowledge of 'N-Vi' and 'N-Vt' collocations were investigated. Then, the study identified difficult types of collocations and the most difficult patterns of errors. Based on the result of data analysis, an attempt was made to identify the sources of errors.; The results of the tasks, finding almost 40% to be incorrect in the production task and 6.2% in the comprehension task, reveals that learners have considerable difficulties in the production of collocations and comparatively fewer difficulties in the comprehension of collocations. The study also found that learners have more difficulty in the use of 'N-Vt' collocations and 'verbs' are the most problematic element in dealing with lexical collocations, followed by 'nouns' and 'case markers'.; After analyzing learners' errors through data analysis and personal interviews, the study discovered the following three main sources of errors which pose considerable problems to learners: (1) Interlingual errors, (2) Intralingual errors, and (3) Extralingual errors. In addition to these findings, while interviewing KFL learners the researcher of the present study found that the learners are neither aware of the collocation phenomenon nor the importance in learning collocations.; Based on the result, the study clearly indicates that collocations should be taught explicitly as a critical part of second language vocabulary learning. In addition, the results suggest that the starting points of teaching collocations should be raising learners' levels of awareness about the collocation phenomenon, stressing on the importance of learning collocations to achieve native speaker like fluency and accuracy. Advisors/Committee Members: Kim, Namkil (Committee Chair), Simpson, Andrew (Committee Member), Li, Audrey Yen-Hui (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: lexical collocation; Korean heritage learners

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kim, D. H. (2009). A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/206828/rec/416

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Dong Hee. “A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/206828/rec/416.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Dong Hee. “A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors.” 2009. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Kim DH. A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/206828/rec/416.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim DH. A study on the use of lexical collocations of Korean heritage learners: identifying the sources of errors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/206828/rec/416

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