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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Jones, Burton H."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Seegers, Bridget Noreen. Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis.

Degree: PhD, Marine and Environmental Biology, 2015, University of Southern California

The dissertation research completed was fundamentally an exploration of why, when, and where do specific types of algal blooms occur with a focus on harmful algal blooms (HABs). Many bloom events are studied opportunistically or have limited synoptic sampling after the bloom is established, which leads to an inability to make predictions because bloom initiation and evolution are seldom observed. The research of blooms often relies on remote sensing and surface sampling and therefore tends to be 2-D in nature. The problem with this perspective is that it only sees a fraction of the water column and the euphotic zone, and it has been shown that subsurface dynamics are important to bloom onset and development especially for localized events. ❧ I used bio-optical instruments with a focus on multi-month glider deployments combined with satellite data for in situ and remote sensing monitoring of subsurface and surface ocean conditions. The gliders provided information about local subsurface ocean biology and physical dynamics, while satellites give regional large-scale physical and biological data. The gliders enabled the development of multi-month time series that allowed the study of complex subsurface ocean dynamics. Gliders can observe physical subsurface features including fronts, eddies, internal waves, and integrated subsurface current velocities and direction. Additionally, gliders can lead to better understanding of seasonal variation in phytoplankton blooms related to a variety of factors including nutrients from upwelling events, rivers, effluent plumes, and coastal dynamics. ❧ The majority of the research focused on the late winter to spring in the coastal region of the Southern California Bight. This period was selected, because it historically has the highest rates of toxic algal blooms dominated by neurotoxin producing Pseudo-Nitzschia genus, which is a threat to humans and wildlife. Three multi-month field efforts in 2010, 2013 and 2014 were conducted to better understand the initiation and evolution of phytoplankton blooms. Each field season was successful in monitoring the onset and evolution of a Pseudo-Nitzschia bloom and revealed a variety of processes associated with bloom initiation. The 2010 revealed for the first time blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. The 2013 and 2014 seasons demonstrated that southward advection and subsequent retention of phytoplankton communities in the coastal region is at times a primary driver of Pseudo-nitzschia toxic bloom events. ❧ The final chapter combined similar instrumentation to monitor the coastal system during an extended 3-week wastewater discharge to a near-surface (16 m) near-shore (2 km) outfall. The combined AUV and remote sensing dataset indicated that in response to the diversion there was a limited increase in phytoplankton abundance in the upper layer, but that the level of the response overall was less than expected. A variety of explanation… Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Burton H. (Committee Chair), Caron, David A. (Committee Member), Kiefer, Dale A. (Committee Member), Hammond, Douglas E. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: harmful algal blooms; gliders; Southern California Bight

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Seegers, B. N. (2015). Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/527046/rec/5050

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seegers, Bridget Noreen. “Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/527046/rec/5050.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seegers, Bridget Noreen. “Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis.” 2015. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Seegers BN. Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/527046/rec/5050.

Council of Science Editors:

Seegers BN. Phytoplankton bloom initiation in the Southern California Bight: a multi-year local and regional analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/527046/rec/5050


University of Southern California

2. Stauffer, Beth Ann. Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control.

Degree: PhD, Marine and Environmental Biology, 2011, University of Southern California

Nearshore coastal environments are common sites of episodic and stochastic events that rapidly alter the physics and chemistry of the water column and thereby affect plankton biomass and community structure. The dominant factors controlling the manner in which the pelagic communities responds to these changes are still poorly understood owing in part to their episodic nature and in part because they often rely on observations made at low temporal/spatial resolution and correlations between instantaneously measured conditions to draw relationships between the biological and physico-chemical parameters. King Harbor is a small, semi-enclosed recreational embayment within Santa Monica Bay. Nonlinear time-series and linear multiple regression analyses of a high-resolution, year-long dataset allowed an in-depth investigation of the relationship between various chemical/physical factors and algal biomass. A significant relationship with the tidal cycle was manifest primarily as increased biomass and bloom initiation during or in the days following neap tide, especially in the hydrodynamically-constrained northern basin of the harbor. Local histories of dissolved nitrate and salinity were also significant predictors of increased biomass, as was reduced wind speed. ❧ A major fish mortality in King Harbor 8 March 2011 killed approximately 170 tons of fish (Pacific sardine) and garnered international attention as a marine system out of balance. In situ sensors present in the harbor prior to, during and after the event revealed rapid decreases in dissolved oxygen in surface waters from 7-9 March 2011, coincident with the fish mortality event. Continuous and automated observations provided evidence that fish respiration, exacerbated by an incursion of upwelled low-oxygen water, was the immediate cause of fish mortality. The hydrodynamically-constrained northern basin transitioned to extreme and sustained hypoxic conditions while spatially-variable hypoxia was also observed throughout the harbor and adjacent bay for more than ten days following the event. Initial recovery of dissolved oxygen in the harbor was facilitated by storm-mediated mixing of the water column. A trophic shift was observed throughout King Harbor concomitant with dramatic changes in water column chemistry associated with the fish kill. Relative abundances of bacterivorous ciliates increased up to > 80% in the weeks following the fish kill. Multivariate analyses also revealed significant temporal dissimilarity in microplankton community composition and trophic structure within King Harbor during hypoxia, subsequent storm-mediated mixing events, and following the storm. Finally, dramatically reduced photosynthetic yield by the phytoplankton in the northern basis indicated severe physiological stress of the phototroph population during the extreme hypoxia. ❧ Top-down control on phytoplankton populations was examined through experimental studies of the interactions between the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans and several red-tide forming algal… Advisors/Committee Members: Caron, David A. (Committee Chair), Jones, Burton H. (Committee Member), Heidelberg, Karla B. (Committee Member), Kiefer, Dale A. (Committee Member), Sukhatme, Gaurav S. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: harmful algal blooms; phytoplankton; protistan grazing; tidal forcing

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stauffer, B. A. (2011). Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/198718/rec/5060

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stauffer, Beth Ann. “Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/198718/rec/5060.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stauffer, Beth Ann. “Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control.” 2011. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Stauffer BA. Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/198718/rec/5060.

Council of Science Editors:

Stauffer BA. Plankton dynamics in a nearshore coastal environment: responses to short-term environmental fluctuations and top-down control. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2011. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/198718/rec/5060

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