Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Jaffe, Barbara"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Southern California

1. Alcala, Celena. How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2012, University of Southern California

This qualitative study examines how basic skills coordinators at four California Community Colleges lead organizational learning at their campuses as part of the statewide Basic Skills Initiative (BSI). The BSI is a component of the California Community College Chancellor's Office Strategic Plan and addresses the goal of student access and success. Through benchmarking, planning, institutional self-assessment, and collaborative professional development, the BSI lays the foundation for organizational learning of effective basic skills practices. The BSI has measures in place to increase organizational learning at the system-wide, regional, and campus levels. The person central to facilitating organizational learning at the campus level is the basic skills coordinator, a role that did not exist at most California Community Colleges until after the creation of the BSI. Face-to-face interviews with basic skills coordinators and observations of campus basic skills meetings were used to develop four case studies that demonstrate how basic skills coordinators lead the BSI consistent with Huber's (1991) four constructs of organizational learning. This study explains how four basic skills coordinators acquired new knowledge, distributed information to others, interpreted information, and utilized techniques to increase organizational memory. This study also describes how basic skills coordinators relied on collective sensemaking to learn and carry out their roles. Each case study reveals how basic skills coordinators lead an initiative framed by the principles of inquiry, collaboration, and evidence and how they modified their role in response to organizational constraints. Advisors/Committee Members: Bensimon, Estela Mara (Committee Chair), Dowd, Alicia C. (Committee Member), Jaffe, Barbara (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: basic skills initiative; basic skills coordinators; California Community Colleges; organizational learning; culture of evidence; sensemaking; culture of inquiry

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alcala, C. (2012). How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/73036/rec/3234

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alcala, Celena. “How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed July 08, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/73036/rec/3234.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alcala, Celena. “How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning.” 2012. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Alcala C. How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/73036/rec/3234.

Council of Science Editors:

Alcala C. How community college basic skills coordinators lead organizational learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/73036/rec/3234


University of Southern California

2. Subramaniam, Thamizhchelvi. A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2012, University of Southern California

This study investigates whether practitioners’ involvement in an action inquiry project promotes changes in their beliefs, assumptions, and values. The study involved the use of CUE’s action research tools at an urban community college to study the beliefs, assumptions and values that practitioners bring to their institution which may affect or facilitate organizational change. The tool that was involved in the action inquiry process was the Syllabus Review Protocol. The inquiry project represented an experiential self-assessment using the Protocol that encompassed a sample syllabus and a list of indicators reflecting culturally responsive pedagogy. Using these culturally responsive indicators, practitioners compared their syllabi to a sample syllabus and the list of indicators to analyze what is communicated about the institution’s culture through their syllabi. ❧ The ultimate goal of the study was to provide practitioners the opportunity to become aware that the beliefs, assumptions and values related to race and ethnicity that they bring to the classrooms may affect the way they view their students and their students’ ability to succeed. The study revealed that when practitioners were involved in the inquiry process using the Protocol, their interaction in an activity setting promoted reflection and exchange of knowledge and co-construction of new knowledge. These kinds of social interaction within an inquiry process led to changes in their beliefs and behavior. This study contributes to the body of knowledge about practices that other community colleges and universities could use to investigate their institution’s culture as they work to develop equity minded plans for improving student outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Dowd, Alicia C. (Committee Chair), Jaffe, Barbara (Committee Member), Rousseau, Sylvia G. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: equity; developmental evaluation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Subramaniam, T. (2012). A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/66727/rec/172

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Subramaniam, Thamizhchelvi. “A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed July 08, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/66727/rec/172.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Subramaniam, Thamizhchelvi. “A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change.” 2012. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Subramaniam T. A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/66727/rec/172.

Council of Science Editors:

Subramaniam T. A developmental evaluation of action research as a process for organizational change. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/66727/rec/172

.