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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Higa, Karin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. von Treskow, Jacqueline Ann. All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years.

Degree: Master of Public Art Studies, Public Art Studies, 2012, University of Southern California

A 2002 cover story for the San Francisco Bay Guardian codified a group of local artists that included Barry McGee, Margaret Kilgallen, and Chris Johanson into a Bay Area art movement inextricably tethered to the neighborhood in which they lived, worked, and cultivated their artistic practices. While the Mission was being hit by a tidal wave of redevelopment and gentrification as a result of the city’s dot-com boom, Mission School artists and other cultural producers in the neighborhood were initiating and participating in a succession of grassroots, alternative exhibition spaces, publications, acts of creative resistance, and community-making endeavors aimed at cultivating a culture based on an ethos of resourcefulness, collectivity, and self-support. This thesis will trace the constellation of key sites of production and exhibition through which the Mission School artists moved during the turbulent 1990s in order to bring into focus the cultural landscape of the neighborhood and community that functioned as a “signal of aesthetic value” not only for Mission School artists, but for the plurality of artists who were living and working in the Mission. Advisors/Committee Members: Higa, Karin (Committee Chair), Moss, Karen (Committee Member), Helfand, Glen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: San Francisco; Mission School; 1990s; Chris Johanson; Barry McGee; Margaret Kilgallen; Rigo 23; gentrification; dot-com boom; creative resistance

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APA (6th Edition):

von Treskow, J. A. (2012). All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/27011/rec/615

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

von Treskow, Jacqueline Ann. “All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/27011/rec/615.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

von Treskow, Jacqueline Ann. “All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years.” 2012. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

von Treskow JA. All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/27011/rec/615.

Council of Science Editors:

von Treskow JA. All on different trips: San Francisco's Mission School and the dot-com years. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/27011/rec/615


University of Southern California

2. Milch, Ilana Daphne. Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles.

Degree: Master of Public Art Studies, Public Art Studies, 2012, University of Southern California

This thesis focuses on two Los Angeles artworks—Asshole Mural (1975) by Asco and Eternity Forever (2010) by Marnie Weber—that encourage a revaluation of the traditional conception of marginality as a negative quality or location. Asco and Weber both play with the genre boundaries of cinema by weaving expansive narratives that go beyond the physical plane of the screen into performance, sculptural production, music, and formal constructions that serve as both props and historical evidence of their works. In Asshole Mural, Asco creates a work that pushes against the stereotyping of Chicano artists as mural makers. Weber’s Eternity Forever (the final act of her Spirit Girls Cycle) challenges viewers to reconcile an anachronistic narrative about a fictional ghost band from the 1970s with contemporary art strategies of installation, multimedia, and gender performance. Both Asshole Mural and Eternity Forever refuse the typical understanding of marginality as undesirable in the context of contemporary art, and instead revel in marginality as a generative and flexible site for avant-garde artistic practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Higa, Karin (Committee Chair), Bray, Anne (Committee Member), Gonzalez, Rita (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Los Angeles; Marnie Weber; Asco; Gronk; Patssi Valdez; Willie Herron III; Harry Gamboa Jr; Asshole mural; Eternity forever; Eternal heart; The spirit girls; marginality; performance; murals; sculpture; fiction; No movies; cinema.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Milch, I. D. (2012). Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/78213/rec/1782

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Milch, Ilana Daphne. “Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/78213/rec/1782.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Milch, Ilana Daphne. “Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles.” 2012. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Milch ID. Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/78213/rec/1782.

Council of Science Editors:

Milch ID. Dead girls, monsters, and assholes: marginality in the practices of Asco and Marnie Weber in Los Angeles. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/78213/rec/1782


University of Southern California

3. Vernetti, Santiago. Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema.

Degree: MA, Art and Curatorial Practices in the Public Sphere, 2013, University of Southern California

The term microcinema has emerged over the last decade in scholarship of film and film culture, journalism, and organization mission statements. This thesis explores three microcinemas as case studies: Echo Park Film Center in Los Angeles, CA; Other Cinema in San Francisco, CA; and Light Industry in Brooklyn, NY in order to approach an understanding of microcinemas as small-scale revisionist responses to the norms of movie theaters and screenings in film and art worlds. The microcinema is a contextually responsive critical space that must also be understood as a product of its locality. ❧ I consider the microcinema in relation to historical precedents, specifically the early years of Canyon Cinema. Secondly, each of the microcinemas is described in terms of their physical characteristics, their organizational models, and their programming. Lastly, I turn to Hollis Frampton’s notion of Infinite Cinema as a unique source with which to expand ideas and characterizations of the microcinema. This study argues for the microcinema as a small-scale institution that functions as a necessary site for the activation and preservation of marginalized forms of cultural production and their related distribution networks. Advisors/Committee Members: Anastas, Rhea (Committee Chair), Higa, Karin (Committee Member), Wedell, Noura (Committee Member), Hudson, Suzanne P. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: microcinema; Echo Park Film Center; Light Industry; Other Cinema; film studies; art history; Craig Baldwin; Ed Halter; Thomas Beard; Paolo Davanza; Lisa Marr

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vernetti, S. (2013). Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/251447/rec/3852

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vernetti, Santiago. “Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/251447/rec/3852.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vernetti, Santiago. “Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema.” 2013. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Vernetti S. Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/251447/rec/3852.

Council of Science Editors:

Vernetti S. Locating the microcinema: Echo Park Film Center, Light Industry, and Other Cinema. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/251447/rec/3852

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