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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Gross, Gwen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Badawi, Stacey. The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2009, University of Southern California

This study examined the impact of working with a CLASS coach on an urban school principal's learning centered leadership practice. This mixed-methods case study investigated the following three questions: 1) How does working with a CLASS leadership coach influence leadership practices of urban school principals? 2) In what ways does the leadership practice influence the professional practice of teachers? 3) In what ways does leadership practice influence and incorporate the values of the faculty and community?; The principal worked with a CLASS trained coach three months during the period of data collection. The effects of the coaching were measured using the online Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-Ed) survey, an instrument that provided a summary of the principal's and the teachers' perceptions of the leader's effectiveness on learning-focused leadership behaviors that have been found to correlate with student achievement (Murphy, 2007). In addition, qualitative data were collected from principal and teacher interviews.; There was some evidence to indicate that the coaching positively impacted the principal's practice of effective leadership behaviors. Effects of the coaching on the principal's behaviors included: 1) the principal devoted increased amounts of time to classroom observations and provided teachers with positive, immediate feedback; 2)the principal paced additional focus on staff development and trained teachers to be the leaders of his kind of professional development; 3) the principal placed an increased emphasis on data analysis and next steps to meet the needs of the learners. There was some evidence that these conditions had a positive influence on the teachers' practice; however, the extent to which these practices were impacted could not be determined. Additionally, there was some evidence that the leader incorporated some of the values and beliefs of the faculty and community into the decision making process. Advisors/Committee Members: Reed, Margaret (Committee Chair), Brewer, Dominic J. (Committee Member), Gross, Gwen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: principal coaching; effects of coaching on leadership; transformational leadership; instructional leadership

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Badawi, S. (2009). The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/564659/rec/6641

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Badawi, Stacey. “The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/564659/rec/6641.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Badawi, Stacey. “The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator.” 2009. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Badawi S. The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/564659/rec/6641.

Council of Science Editors:

Badawi S. The effects of coaching on building and sustaining effective leadership practice of an urban school administrator. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/564659/rec/6641


University of Southern California

2. Morse, Michelle M. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2013, University of Southern California

The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies public school superintendents across the nation use to develop executive leadership teams. Extensive research has been conducted in private for profit and medical settings, however relatively little research on leading teams has been conducted in the public education sector. Research based practices from the current research were considered and the following three research questions were asked: 1) How do superintendents select leadership team members? 2) What strategies do superintendents use to foster a collaborative climate? and 3) How do superintendents distribute and share leadership responsibilities? A mixed methods approach was used to ascertain how superintendents select their leadership team members, develop a collaborative climate, and distribute leadership responsibilities among the executive team. The study included the purposeful sampling of five superintendents and 51 leadership team members who work in large K-12 districts across four states. The results indicate that superintendents in this study balance person-focused and task-focused competencies in the selection process for new team members; however, issues of recruitment and retention are barriers to the selection process. Superintendents utilize six major collaboration strategies (clearly defined roles and responsibilities, climate of trust, openness, honesty, consistency, and respect) and also use individual reflective practices as a means to build leadership capacity. Superintendents use participative strategies with their leadership teams at a higher rate than delegation strategies when distributing leadership across the team. Implications for practice are provided in the researcher-developed “Framework for Building a Leadership Team.” Advisors/Committee Members: Castruita, Rudy Max (Committee Chair), Garcia, Pedro Enrique (Committee Member), García, Pedro Enrique (Committee Member), Gross, Gwen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: superintendents; leadership; teams; selection; collaboration; distributed leadership; strategies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morse, M. M. (2013). Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247316/rec/6088

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morse, Michelle M. “Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247316/rec/6088.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morse, Michelle M. “Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.” 2013. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Morse MM. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247316/rec/6088.

Council of Science Editors:

Morse MM. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247316/rec/6088


University of Southern California

3. Smith, Donna J. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2013, University of Southern California

The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies public school superintendents across the nation use to develop executive leadership teams. Extensive research has been conducted in private for profit and medical settings, however relatively little research on leading teams has been conducted in the public education sector. Research based practices from the current research were considered and the following three research questions were asked: 1) How do superintendents select leadership team members? 2) What strategies do superintendents use to foster a collaborative climate? and 3) How do superintendents distribute and share leadership responsibilities? A mixed methods approach was used to ascertain how superintendents select their leadership team members, develop a collaborative climate, and distribute leadership responsibilities among the executive team. The study included the purposeful sampling of five superintendents and 51 leadership team members who work in large K-12 districts across four states. The results indicate that superintendents in this study balance person-focused and task-focused competencies in the selection process for new team members; however, issues of recruitment and retention are barriers to the selection process. Superintendents utilize six major collaboration strategies (clearly defined roles and responsibilities, climate of trust, openness, honesty, consistency, and respect) and also use individual reflective practices as a means to build leadership capacity. Superintendents use participative strategies with their leadership teams at a higher rate than delegation strategies when distributing leadership across the team. Implications for practice are provided in the researcher-developed “Framework for Building a Leadership Team.” Advisors/Committee Members: Castruita, Rudy Max (Committee Chair), Garcia, Pedro Enrique (Committee Member), García, Pedro Enrique (Committee Member), Gross, Gwen (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: leadership; teams; collaboration; distributed leadership; selection strategies

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, D. J. (2013). Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247065/rec/6089

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Donna J. “Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247065/rec/6089.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Donna J. “Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams.” 2013. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith DJ. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247065/rec/6089.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith DJ. Strategies used by superintendents in developing leadership teams. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/247065/rec/6089

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