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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Greene, Ernest"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Gaur, Ashmita. Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2009, University of Southern California

Single-channel psychophysics may not reflect performance with dynamic, multi-channel stimuli (e.g., speech stimuli) in cochlear implant (CI) listeners due to interactions between electrodes at the periphery or due to central processing interactions or both. The first part of the study measured single and multi-channel intensity discrimination in 5 Nucleus CI users, as functions of the relative level, electrode location and stimulation rate of the masker and probe electrodes. Spatial distance and relative stimulation levels between interleaved pairs of electrodes were found to significantly influence the degree of channel interaction. The second part of the study investigated how temporal offset between interleaved pulses may affect channel interaction at suprathreshold levels in 3 Nucleus CI users. Results showed that interactions were elevated for short temporal offsets and were reduced as the temporal offset was increased to half the stimulation period. Advisors/Committee Members: Shannon, Robert (Committee Chair), Meng, Ellis F. (Committee Member), Greene, Ernest (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: cochlear implants; psychophysics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gaur, A. (2009). Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/321894/rec/3561

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gaur, Ashmita. “Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/321894/rec/3561.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gaur, Ashmita. “Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gaur A. Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/321894/rec/3561.

Council of Science Editors:

Gaur A. Intensity discrimination in single and multi-electrode patterns in cochlear implants. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/321894/rec/3561


University of Southern California

2. Hintiryan, Houri. The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2009, University of Southern California

When consumption of a novel tasting substance is followed by administration of a chemical agent that produces physiological changes indicative of malaise, animals will reduce their consumption of the substance during subsequent encounters. This learned response is traditionally referred to as a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Studies have shown that the hormone estradiol is capable of producing this learned gustatory aversion. In addition, estradiol produces reductions in food intake and body weight, a phenomenon that is referred to as its anorectic effects. As a consequence of this anorectic effect, we question whether estradiol truly can induce CTA learning. Therefore, one of the purposes of the experiments presented in this dissertation was to test the dissociability of estradiol CTA and estradiol anorexia. The second purpose of this thesis was to examine the neural basis of estradiol CTA and estradiol anorexia. Four approaches were adopted to test the ability of estradiol to condition independent of its ability to produce reductions in eating. First, we show that estradiol can produce a CTA in the absence of its anorectic effects. Second, we demonstrate that a low dose of estradiol that produces reductions in eating does not produce CTA. Next, we show that contingent pairing is necessary for a CTA since non-contingent pairing does not result in the gustatory aversion. Finally, we dissociate the conditioning effect of estradiol from its anorectic effect by showing that both excitotoxic and electrolytic lesions of the lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN) either attenuated or blocked an estradiol CTA, while leaving estradiol anorexia unaffected. Together, all of the data suggest that estradiol can condition a gustatory aversion. The data also suggest that estradiol elicits a CTA based on its aversion inducing properties since lesions of the lateral PBN, an area that processes visceral information, blocked the CTA.; Third, the data show that the lateral PBN is necessary for estradiol CTA. Finally, the studies show that although the lateral PBN is involved in different types of anorexia, it is not involved in estradiol anorexia. Advisors/Committee Members: Chambers, Kathleen C. (Committee Chair), Lavond, David G. (Committee Member), Wilcox, Rand R. (Committee Member), Greene, Ernest (Committee Member), Watts, Alan G. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: estradiol; conditioned taste aversion learning; anorexia; lateral parabrachial nucleus; associative learning; female rats

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hintiryan, H. (2009). The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/232610/rec/7011

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hintiryan, Houri. “The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/232610/rec/7011.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hintiryan, Houri. “The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hintiryan H. The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/232610/rec/7011.

Council of Science Editors:

Hintiryan H. The neural basis of estradiol conditioned taste aversion learning and estradiol anorexia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/232610/rec/7011


University of Southern California

3. Schwartz, Noah Z. Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2007, University of Southern California

Inverted faces are recognized more slowly and less accurately than upright faces (Yin, 1969). Explanations of this deficit focus on the idea that upright faces are processed configurally or in a holistic/distributed manner, whereas inverted faces are processed in a part wise fashion. Many of the studies used to support this position, however, are confounded by individual differences in face discrimination ability, and a general lack of control over stimulus discriminability across conditions. Using a novel recognition paradigm that controls for individual differences in task difficulty, we show that subjects recognize upright and inverted faces in the same manner, making significantly greater use of configural information than part information. These findings contradict existing face recognition theories and also offer an explanation for other face inversion effects such as the Thatcher Effect (Thompson, 1980). Advisors/Committee Members: Greene, Ernest (Committee Chair), Ko, Chien-Ping (Committee Member), Walsh, David A. (Committee Member), Wilcox, Rand R. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: face recognition; face inversion effect

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schwartz, N. Z. (2007). Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/556663/rec/5448

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schwartz, Noah Z. “Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/556663/rec/5448.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schwartz, Noah Z. “Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion.” 2007. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Schwartz NZ. Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/556663/rec/5448.

Council of Science Editors:

Schwartz NZ. Reconsidering face specialization and face inversion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/556663/rec/5448

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