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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Ephraim, Ronnie"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Kruizinga, Kristin Dawn. Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2012, University of Southern California

One of the most influential factors affecting students’ academic performance consists of the pedagogical practices enacted within the classroom. Efforts to enhance teachers’ instructional practices are, in turn, addressed by providing teachers with opportunities to engage in professional development. The purpose of this study was to identify whether the purpose, process, and structure of professional development opportunities enacted within a high performing secondary school were consistent with the elements of professional development that have been deemed conducive to facilitating professional learning and likely to lead to teacher practice change. This study also sought to identify how the relationship between knowledge and practice was conceptualized within the context of professional development. ❧ A qualitative case study was conducted, including seven teacher interviews and one principal interview. Four professional development observations were also conducted. There were two significant findings revealed by this study. The first finding suggested that, while the purpose, process, and structure are discussed within the literature as separate, yet equally significant components of professional development, it is the interconnectedness between and the interactions among these elements that define the quality of professional learning that is likely to ensue. The second finding revealed that the relationship between knowledge and practice was conceptualized in a manner that was not conducive to high quality professional learning, and, thus, unlikely to lead to any long-term practice change. ❧ The most significant implications drawn from this study suggest that the purpose, process, and structure of professional development must be viewed as conjoined elements that function together to foster professional learning that is likely to lead to teacher practice change; teachers must be empowered to take greater agency over their own professional learning; and the paradigm between knowledge and practice must be treated in a manner that facilitates professional learning in order to prompt teacher practice change. Advisors/Committee Members: Slayton, Julie M. (Committee Chair), Anderson, Lauren (Committee Member), Ephraim, Ronnie (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: professional development; professional learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kruizinga, K. D. (2012). Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/57228/rec/3626

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kruizinga, Kristin Dawn. “Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 15, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/57228/rec/3626.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kruizinga, Kristin Dawn. “Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development.” 2012. Web. 15 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kruizinga KD. Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/57228/rec/3626.

Council of Science Editors:

Kruizinga KD. Investigating the enactment of professionald development practices in a high performing secondary school setting: a case study examining the purpose, process, and structure of professional development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/57228/rec/3626


University of Southern California

2. Baseri, Shelly Gabay. The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2013, University of Southern California

The ability of teachers to transfer what they have learned in a teacher education program to the classroom has been found by numerous researchers to contribute to students' successful learning (Bransford and Schwartz, 1999; Darling-Hammond, 2000). Additionally, teacher efficacy, or a ""teacher’s belief in his or her capability to organize and execute courses of action required to successfully accomplish a specific teaching task in a particular context” (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001, p.223), has also been traced to students' achievement in the classroom (Alviar-Martin, et al., 2008; Ross, Cousins & Gadalla 1996; Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001). A mixed-methods study was conducted to reveal to what extent candidates in an online MAT TESOL program feel self-efficacious to transfer ESL instructional strategies learned in the TESOL Pedagogy course to the classroom context. The data gathered indicated that candidates' self-efficacy to transfer the strategies was based on various factors, including candidates' prior exposure to the same instructional strategies, as well as the extent to which the strategies contribute to English Language Learners' communicative competence. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplan, Sandra (Committee Chair), Ephraim, Ronnie (Committee Member), Keim, Robert G. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: teacher candidates’ transfer of skills; teacher self-efficacy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baseri, S. G. (2013). The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/127752/rec/7358

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baseri, Shelly Gabay. “The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 15, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/127752/rec/7358.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baseri, Shelly Gabay. “The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners.” 2013. Web. 15 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Baseri SG. The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/127752/rec/7358.

Council of Science Editors:

Baseri SG. The transfer of online instruction to TESOL candidates' perceived self-efficacy of teaching English language learners. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/127752/rec/7358


University of Southern California

3. Levinson, Christine Caro. Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice.

Degree: EdD, Education, 2012, University of Southern California

Guided practice, also referred to as student teaching, is a traditional component of teacher education that prepares teacher candidates for the complexities of the classroom. Teacher candidates learn pedagogical instructional strategies in their coursework and apply them during their classroom experiences. While guided practice continues to be an integral part of teacher education, several factors affect the teacher candidates’ ability to implement the strategies with a high degree of fidelity. In this mixed methods study, four teacher candidates enrolled in the online Masters of Art in Teaching program ([email protected]) at the University of Southern California were interviewed, surveyed, and observed to determine their perceptions of the factors that affect their ability to implement the strategies learned from their online secondary English Language Arts pedagogy course in their guided practice experiences. Second, the study examined teacher candidates’ ability to implement the strategies with fidelity. Results indicated that the degree of support received from the teacher candidates’ guiding teachers, also known as cooperating or master teachers, has the greatest impact on the candidates’ ability to implement the strategies during the guided practice experience. Additionally, the degree of freedom to plan and implement their own lessons determines the teacher candidates’ ability to implement the strategies. In regards to fidelity of implementation, the study found that the school context, such as the culture, attitude, and organizational characteristics, can enhance or impede the candidates’ ability to implement the strategies with a high degree of fidelity. The findings suggest the need for teacher candidates to be paired with knowledgeable, supportive, and well-trained guiding teachers who understand and support the university’s core values in an effort to develop effective classroom teachers. Moreover, teacher candidates require knowledge in how to navigate school contexts to better serve their students. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplan, Sandra (Committee Chair), Ephraim, Ronnie (Committee Member), Keim, Robert G. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: student teaching; guided practice; online; teacher education; preliminary teachers; fidelity of implementation; English language arts; pedagogy; cooperating teachers; guiding teachers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Levinson, C. C. (2012). Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/46843/rec/2739

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Levinson, Christine Caro. “Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 15, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/46843/rec/2739.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Levinson, Christine Caro. “Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice.” 2012. Web. 15 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Levinson CC. Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/46843/rec/2739.

Council of Science Editors:

Levinson CC. Factors that influence the ability of preservice teachers to apply English language arts pedagogy in guided practice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/46843/rec/2739

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