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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Dawson, Michael Edward"). Showing records 1 – 9 of 9 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Kumar, Serenita S. Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2013, University of Southern California

 This short-term longitudinal investigation among adolescent peer groups examined associations between popularity and behavioral attributes of friends, with a particular focus on friends’ aggression, extracurricular… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: adolescence; popularity; friendship; aggression; academic engagement; extracurricular engagement; GPA

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kumar, S. S. (2013). Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/310435/rec/5113

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kumar, Serenita S. “Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/310435/rec/5113.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kumar, Serenita S. “Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence.” 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kumar SS. Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/310435/rec/5113.

Council of Science Editors:

Kumar SS. Popularity as a predictor of friendship affiliation in adolescence. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/310435/rec/5113


University of Southern California

2. Xiao, Rong. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2013, University of Southern California

 Background: Stress plays an important role in the etiology, progress, and prognosis of schizophrenia. Understanding how stress responsivity influences the functional outcomes among people with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: skin conductance level; stress reactivity; emotional perception; psychiatric symptoms; role functioning

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APA (6th Edition):

Xiao, R. (2013). Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6400

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Xiao, Rong. “Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6400.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Xiao, Rong. “Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.” 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Xiao R. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6400.

Council of Science Editors:

Xiao R. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6400


University of Southern California

3. Berntsen, Leslie. Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2015, University of Southern California

 There are multiple pathways to antisocial behavior, including early‐onset/life‐course persistent, adolescent‐onset/limited, childhood‐limited, and low/non‐offending, all of which are characterized by unique sets of risk/protective factors.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: adolescence; antisocial behavior; delinquency; development; psychopathic traits; psychophysiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Berntsen, L. (2015). Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/551843/rec/5314

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berntsen, Leslie. “Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/551843/rec/5314.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berntsen, Leslie. “Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study.” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Berntsen L. Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/551843/rec/5314.

Council of Science Editors:

Berntsen L. Psychophysiological reactivity to stress, psychopathic traits, and developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior: a prospective, longitudinal study. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/551843/rec/5314


University of Southern California

4. Klum, Mallory Kathleen. Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors.

Degree: MA, Psychological Sciences, 2012, University of Southern California

 The purpose of this study was to investigate which verbal and nonverbal behaviors people used to evaluate a stranger’s state extraversion. Participants who were matched… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: state extraversion; manipulated state extraversion; behavior; gestures; eyeblink rate; perception; facial expression

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APA (6th Edition):

Klum, M. K. (2012). Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/120409/rec/4974

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Klum, Mallory Kathleen. “Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/120409/rec/4974.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Klum, Mallory Kathleen. “Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors.” 2012. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Klum MK. Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/120409/rec/4974.

Council of Science Editors:

Klum MK. Perception of experimentally manipulated state extraversion and extraversion-linked behaviors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/120409/rec/4974


University of Southern California

5. Stein, Leah I. Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders.

Degree: PhD, Occupational Science, 2013, University of Southern California

 It is indisputable that good oral health is important to both psychological and physiological health. However, despite the importance of oral care, disparities exist for… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: autism spectrum disorder; dental care; electrodermal activity; occupational therapy; sensory integration; sensory processing

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APA (6th Edition):

Stein, L. I. (2013). Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/346134/rec/4628

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stein, Leah I. “Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/346134/rec/4628.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stein, Leah I. “Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders.” 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Stein LI. Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/346134/rec/4628.

Council of Science Editors:

Stein LI. Oral care and sensory sensitivities in children with autism spectrum disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/346134/rec/4628


University of Southern California

6. Reimann, Martin. Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2015, University of Southern California

 This research establishes that offering non-food rewards (i.e., lottery tickets) bundled with smaller food portions as an alternative to full-portion meals can substantially decrease chosen… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: reward and positive reinforcement; incentive saliance; wanting; smaller food portion choice; mesolimbic dopamine system; striatum; fMRI; neuromarketing; consumer neuroscience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reimann, M. (2015). Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/228495/rec/5591

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reimann, Martin. “Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/228495/rec/5591.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reimann, Martin. “Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions.” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Reimann M. Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/228495/rec/5591.

Council of Science Editors:

Reimann M. Reward substitution: how consumers can be incentivized to choose smaller food portions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2015. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/228495/rec/5591


University of Southern California

7. Sutherland, Matthew Ryan. Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2014, University of Southern California

 Emotional arousal changes the way visual information is selectively processed. Emotional stimuli dominate attention and are better remembered at the expense of competing stimuli. But… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: emotional arousal; attention; memory; cognitive aging

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APA (6th Edition):

Sutherland, M. R. (2014). Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/420227/rec/2312

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sutherland, Matthew Ryan. “Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/420227/rec/2312.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sutherland, Matthew Ryan. “Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing.” 2014. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sutherland MR. Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/420227/rec/2312.

Council of Science Editors:

Sutherland MR. Emotion, attention and cognitive aging: the effects of emotional arousal on subsequent visual processing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/420227/rec/2312


University of Southern California

8. Singh, Kulwinder. Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2014, University of Southern California

 As prevalence rates of obesity greatly increase in response to changing societal and environmental landscapes, it has become clear that genetic influences cannot solely account… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: classical conditioning; differential autonomic conditioning; appetitive condtioning; food cues; obesity

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, K. (2014). Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/434361/rec/1376

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Kulwinder. “Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/434361/rec/1376.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Kulwinder. “Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating.” 2014. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Singh K. Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/434361/rec/1376.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh K. Classically conditioned responses to food cues among obese and normal weight individuals: conditioning as an explanatory mechanism for excessive eating. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/434361/rec/1376


University of Southern California

9. Courtney, Christopher Gaelan. Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, University of Southern California

 The current study sought to examine the psychophysiological response patterns associated with varying levels of threat and cognitive workload in a highly immersive virtual environment… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: psychophysiology; virtual reality; navigation; threat; cognitive workload

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APA (6th Edition):

Courtney, C. G. (2012). Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/101676/rec/5313

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Courtney, Christopher Gaelan. “Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/101676/rec/5313.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Courtney, Christopher Gaelan. “Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments.” 2012. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Courtney CG. Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/101676/rec/5313.

Council of Science Editors:

Courtney CG. Psychophysiological assessment of cognitive and affective responses for prediction of performance in arousal inducing virtual environments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/101676/rec/5313

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