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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Clark, Richard E."). Showing records 1 – 12 of 12 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Tirapelle, Leslie A. The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2010, University of Southern California

 Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) is a method of eliciting knowledge from experts that can inform more comprehensive instructional support materials for novices. The traditional lecture… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: automated knowledge; cognitive task analysis; open cricothyrotomy; procedural knowledge; procedural skills; surgical skills instruction

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APA (6th Edition):

Tirapelle, L. A. (2010). The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/328092/rec/6592

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tirapelle, Leslie A. “The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/328092/rec/6592.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tirapelle, Leslie A. “The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tirapelle LA. The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/328092/rec/6592.

Council of Science Editors:

Tirapelle LA. The effect of cognitive task analysis based instruction on surgical skills expertise and performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/328092/rec/6592


University of Southern California

2. Canillas, Eko Natividad. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.

Degree: EdD, Education, 2010, University of Southern California

 Evidence in research suggests experts omit 70% of procedural steps when describing a surgical procedure. Additionally, prior knowledge of a procedure may have an affect… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: knowledge omissions; CTA methods; cognitive task analysis methods; surgical subject matter experts

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APA (6th Edition):

Canillas, E. N. (2010). The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Canillas, Eko Natividad. “The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Canillas, Eko Natividad. “The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Canillas EN. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370.

Council of Science Editors:

Canillas EN. The use of cognitive task analysis for identifying the critical information omitted when experts describe surgical procedures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309759/rec/7370


University of Southern California

3. Crispen, Patrick Douglas. Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2010, University of Southern California

 Residents in surgical residency programs are taught through a hands-on apprenticeship under the supervision of surgical subject matter experts despite the fact that those experts… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive task analysis; cricothyrotomy; CTA; medical education; surgery

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APA (6th Edition):

Crispen, P. D. (2010). Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/291454/rec/3331

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crispen, Patrick Douglas. “Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/291454/rec/3331.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crispen, Patrick Douglas. “Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Crispen PD. Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/291454/rec/3331.

Council of Science Editors:

Crispen PD. Identifying the point of diminishing marginal utility for cognitive task analysis surgical subject matter expert interviews. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/291454/rec/3331


University of Southern California

4. Ho, Hsin-Ning. The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance.

Degree: EdD, Education, 2010, University of Southern California

 This study examined the impact of different levels of task difficulty and expertise on self-efficacy judgments. In addition, the study examines how self-efficacy judgments affect… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: task performance; mental effort; self-efficacy; expertise; levels of task difficulty

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APA (6th Edition):

Ho, H. (2010). The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/340678/rec/7139

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ho, Hsin-Ning. “The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/340678/rec/7139.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ho, Hsin-Ning. “The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ho H. The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/340678/rec/7139.

Council of Science Editors:

Ho H. The relationship between levels of expertise, task difficulty, perceived self-efficacy, and mental effort investment in task performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/340678/rec/7139


University of Southern California

5. Campbell, Julia C. Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2010, University of Southern California

 Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is a powerful tool for eliciting expert knowledge to enhance training practices. While CTA methods have been employed successfully to design… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive task analysis; self-efficacy

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APA (6th Edition):

Campbell, J. C. (2010). Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/311540/rec/2322

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Campbell, Julia C. “Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/311540/rec/2322.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Campbell, Julia C. “Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Campbell JC. Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/311540/rec/2322.

Council of Science Editors:

Campbell JC. Employing cognitive task analysis supported instruction to increase medical student and surgical resident performance and self-efficacy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/311540/rec/2322


University of Southern California

6. Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.

Degree: EdD, Education (Counseling Psychology), 2010, University of Southern California

 This study used cognitive task analysis (CTA) knowledge elicitation strategies to find the percentage and type of information that experts omit when describing how to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive task analysis; CTA; psychology; surgical training; education; open cricothyrotomy; central venous line placement; surgery; teaching; University of Southern California; USC; Keck School of Medicine; decision steps; Maryann Tolano-Leveque; Dr. Richard Clark; knowledge omissions; gold standard; subject matter experts

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APA (6th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, M. (2010). Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. “Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tolano-Leveque, Maryann. “Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tolano-Leveque M. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747.

Council of Science Editors:

Tolano-Leveque M. Using cognitive task analysis to determine the percentage of critical information that experts omit when describing a surgical procedure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/351724/rec/7747


University of Southern California

7. Bartholio, Craig W. The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2010, University of Southern California

 The purpose of this study was to examine the amount of relevant information experts provide and fail to provide when asked to describe how to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cognitive task analysis; expertise; subject matter expert; knowledge types; surgery; medical education; training; interview; automaticity

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APA (6th Edition):

Bartholio, C. W. (2010). The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/385767/rec/7376

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bartholio, Craig W. “The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/385767/rec/7376.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bartholio, Craig W. “The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bartholio CW. The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/385767/rec/7376.

Council of Science Editors:

Bartholio CW. The use of cognitive task analysis to investigate how many experts must be interviewed to acquire the critical information needed to perform a central venous catheter placement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/385767/rec/7376


University of Southern California

8. Bogenmann, Emil. Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars.

Degree: EdD, Education (Psychology & Technology), 2008, University of Southern California

 Science trainees at a pediatric research center are strongly encouraged to attend research seminars, yet their attendance at lectures has steadily declined, jeopardizing the academic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: science; trainees; motivation; values; self-efficacy

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APA (6th Edition):

Bogenmann, E. (2008). Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/49814/rec/4233

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bogenmann, Emil. “Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/49814/rec/4233.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bogenmann, Emil. “Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars.” 2008. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bogenmann E. Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/49814/rec/4233.

Council of Science Editors:

Bogenmann E. Motivational variables that influence the attendance of science trainees at research seminars. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/49814/rec/4233


University of Southern California

9. Reel, Sidalia Garrett. A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans.

Degree: EdD, Education (Psychology & Technology), 2007, University of Southern California

 Since 1995, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) has been employed to reveal unconscious stereotyping. This meta-analysis examined studies that used the IAT in combination with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: stereotype interventions; African American stereotyping; stereotype modification; automated stereotyping; implicit bias; IAT; black stereotyping; implicit stereotypes

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APA (6th Edition):

Reel, S. G. (2007). A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/325107/rec/242

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reel, Sidalia Garrett. “A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/325107/rec/242.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reel, Sidalia Garrett. “A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans.” 2007. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Reel SG. A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/325107/rec/242.

Council of Science Editors:

Reel SG. A meta-analysis of interventions to modify stereotypes about African Americans. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/325107/rec/242


University of Southern California

10. Sasaki, Hiroshi Miyawaki. An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition.

Degree: PhD, Education (Counseling Psychology), 2008, University of Southern California

 Awareness of our biases is essential to multicultural counseling competence, and recent advances in implicit social cognition reveal that therapists who are motivated to be… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: multicultural competency; implicit attitude; unconscious bias; therapist training

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APA (6th Edition):

Sasaki, H. M. (2008). An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/69489/rec/772

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sasaki, Hiroshi Miyawaki. “An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/69489/rec/772.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sasaki, Hiroshi Miyawaki. “An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition.” 2008. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sasaki HM. An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/69489/rec/772.

Council of Science Editors:

Sasaki HM. An intervention for stereotype automaticity in therapist-trainees: a pilot study in implicit multicultural social cognition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/69489/rec/772


University of Southern California

11. Yates, Kenneth Anthony. Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions.

Degree: EdD, Education (Leadership), 2007, University of Southern California

 Experts are often called upon to provide their knowledge and skills for curriculum and materials development, teaching, and training. Experts also provide information to develop… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cognition; cognitive task analysis; CTA; knowledge types; knowledge elicitation

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APA (6th Edition):

Yates, K. A. (2007). Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/404259/rec/7522

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yates, Kenneth Anthony. “Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/404259/rec/7522.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yates, Kenneth Anthony. “Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions.” 2007. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Yates KA. Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/404259/rec/7522.

Council of Science Editors:

Yates KA. Towards a taxonomy of cognitive task analysis methods: a search for cognition and task analysis interactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2007. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/404259/rec/7522


University of Southern California

12. Early, Sean Francis. The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2008, University of Southern California

 The appropriate role for explicit, directive guidance during instruction has been debated in the literature for several decades (Sweller, Kirschner, & Clark, 2006; Mayer, 2004;… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: guidance; learning; effect size; multiple regression; leadership; web-based; training

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APA (6th Edition):

Early, S. F. (2008). The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/148951/rec/6598

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Early, Sean Francis. “The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/148951/rec/6598.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Early, Sean Francis. “The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment.” 2008. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Early SF. The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/148951/rec/6598.

Council of Science Editors:

Early SF. The effect of guidance on learning in a web-based, media-enriched learning environment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2008. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/148951/rec/6598

.