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You searched for +publisher:"University of Southern California" +contributor:("Avol, Edward"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Pickering, Trevor A. Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study.

Degree: MS, Biostatistics, 2010, University of Southern California

We performed a follow-up study to track lung function of participants in the Children’s Health Study (CHS), a multi-year longitudinal analysis of lung function development for 3,787 children in twelve Southern California communities. Subjects were followed past 18 years of age in order to examine the relationship between ambient pollution and two lung function indices: maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). There was a significant negative relationship between several pollutants (acid vapor, NO2, particles with diameter less than 2.5 microns, particles with diameter less than 10 microns, and elemental carbon) and lung function. This relationship grew stronger with each year increase in age, up to 18 years (P Advisors/Committee Members: Gauderman, James W. (Committee Chair), Berhane, Kiros (Committee Member), Avol, Edward (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: lung function; Children'; s Health Study; pollution; adolescent

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pickering, T. A. (2010). Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/366604/rec/4998

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pickering, Trevor A. “Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/366604/rec/4998.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pickering, Trevor A. “Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study.” 2010. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Pickering TA. Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/366604/rec/4998.

Council of Science Editors:

Pickering TA. Persistence of pollution-induced lung function deficits in early adulthood: evidence from the Children's Health Study. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/366604/rec/4998


University of Southern California

2. Urman, Robert. Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function.

Degree: MS, Preventive Medicine (Health Behavior), 2010, University of Southern California

Background: Studies have shown that decreased lung function is predictive of various health outcomes including asthma, heart disease, and death. Although there are some inconsistencies in the literature, many studies have shown that exposure to various types of air pollutants negatively impact lung growth in children and adults. Furthermore, there is some evidence that social stress may also be of importance in the understanding of respiratory health; however, no studies have explored the joint relationship between lung function, air pollution, and stress. The aims of this study are to further explore the relationship between childhood lung function and air pollution, specifically traffic-related pollutants (TRPs), and to assess the potential modifying effects of parental stress.; Methods: A total of 1,811 children from a new southern Californian Children’s Health Study cohort participated in lung function testing during the sixth year of the study. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume during the first second (FEV1), maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) and peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were measured at each of the 44 participating schools. Various metrics of TRP were used including distance to road and two different types of model-based estimates of pollutant concentration. The first set of modeled TRP estimates were based on the CALINE4 line-source air-quality dispersion model, which took into account local traffic information and meteorological conditions. The other set of TRP are predicted residential exposures of NO2, NO, and NOx that incorporated population demographics and topography in addition to local traffic information. Parental perceived stress and other covariates were collected through questionnaire.; Results: Close proximity to a major road was found to be negatively associated with both FEV1 and FVC, while close proximity to a freeway was negatively associated with only FVC. Among all children, no observed associations were found with CALINE4 predicted exposures. However with respect to the 10th-90th percent distribution, predicted residential NO was associated with a 1.4% deficit in FEV1 and a 2% deficit in FVC (per 7.6 ppb). Similarly, predicted residential NOx was associated with a 1.3% deficit in FEV1 and a 1.9% deficit in FVC (per 21.9 ppb), while residential NO2 was associated with a 1.7% deficit in FVC (per 14.5 ppb). The impact of various TRPs was more pronounced among children whose parents were classified as being highly stressed. Over the same distribution of predicted residential exposures to NO, NOx, and NO2, these children experienced a 3.3%, 3.6%, and 3.6% deficit in FEV1, respectively, while for children in lower stress homes, these pollutants had little impact. Similar findings were also observed with respect to the non-freeway component of CALINE4-modeled TRP and distance to a major road as well as when FVC was chosen as the outcome. Effect modification by parental stress was statistically significant in all of these examples. No statistically significant… Advisors/Committee Members: Gauderman, James W. (Committee Chair), Avol, Edward (Committee Member), McConnell, Robert (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: traffic; stress; lung function; air pollution

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Urman, R. (2010). Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/387235/rec/965

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Urman, Robert. “Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/387235/rec/965.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Urman, Robert. “Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function.” 2010. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Urman R. Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/387235/rec/965.

Council of Science Editors:

Urman R. Association of traffic-related pollution and stress on childhood lung function. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/387235/rec/965

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