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You searched for +publisher:"University of South Carolina" +contributor:("Angela Liese"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of South Carolina

1. Sohi, Inderbir Singh. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.

Degree: M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2012, University of South Carolina

Introduction: The rise in obesity rates has increased research into unhealthful dietary behaviors. Limited access to food outlets, such as grocery stores and supermarkets, is a major problem for many low income populations. Purpose: We explored potential differences in healthy food availability perceptions and food shopping behaviors between residents living in the areas designated as having low food access versus those with high food access. Methods: Data came from a cross-sectional telephone survey of 968 residents living in eight counties of South Carolina. The survey asked about residents' healthy food availability perceptions and food shopping behaviors. Data from an eight-county food environment field census were used to replicate the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) healthier food retail tract measure and USDA ERS (United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Services) food desert measure. Ordinary Least Squares regression, which estimated adjusted means and logistic regression, which estimated odds ratios, were used to analyze the data. Results: Residents of non-healthier retail tracts, according to the CDC's designation, were significantly more likely to rate their food environment and food shopping access as poor, to travel further distances to their primarily utilized food store (10.5 vs. 6.4 miles), and to accumulate more total shopping miles per week (31.2 vs. 15.9 miles) than residents living in healthier food retail tracts. Residents of food deserts as designated by the USDA ERS food access measure, had a lower odds of shopping at a supercenter (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.16 - 0.95) than residents of non-food deserts. Conclusion: Residents of low food access areas had different food shopping behaviors and perceptions of healthy food availability as compared to residents of high food access areas, depending on the food access measure. The results are novel because no previous research has looked at these food access measures in conjunction with any subjective measures. These findings should motivate communities and policy advocates to use the results to better approach widespread healthy food access issues in the US. Advisors/Committee Members: Angela Liese.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Public Health; food access; food availability; food environment perceptions; food shopping behaviors; healthy food access; low food access

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sohi, I. S. (2012). Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sohi, Inderbir Singh. “Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sohi, Inderbir Singh. “Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sohi IS. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178.

Council of Science Editors:

Sohi IS. Exploration of Differences in Food Environment Perceptions and Shopping Behaviors among Residents of Low Food Access Versus High Food Access Areas. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2012. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/1178


University of South Carolina

2. Drucker, Erin Rebekah. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.

Degree: MS, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2015, University of South Carolina

Purpose: Food insecurity is a major public health problem in the United States (US) with 14.5% of US households having experienced some level of food insecurity in 2012. Among households with children, 20% experienced low food security in 2012, and in half of these households, both the children and adults were affected. Food insecurity among children can have lifelong negative health and mental effects. Life events are defined as self-­‐reported life changes, which create a strain on resources and an opportunity for food insecurity, Methods: The Midlands Family Study (MFS) was a cross-­‐ sectional study that surveyed households with children within an eight-­‐county region in South Carolina between March 2012 and May 2013 and obtained information on food security and life events. Of 538 total participants, 511 remained for analysis: 28% were food secure (FS), 37.2% were low food secure (LFS), and 34.1% experienced very low food security among children (VLFS-­‐C). Life events were analyzed by overall positive and negative count and summed impact, and four life event types were created with author consensus to analyze positive and negative life event counts and summed impact by event type. Results: VLFS-­‐C and LFS participants reported experiencing more negative life events, and greater summed impact of negative life events compared to FS participants. Higher count and impact of negative life events are associated with risk for VLFS-­‐C and LFS status. When testing for independent associations of specific event types with food security status, positive events involving family and relationships were associated with decreased odds of food insecurity. Conclusion: Experiencing a higher number of negative life events, as well as perceiving those events as having a greater impact, is associated with higher odds of VLFS-­‐C and LFS status among the MFS study population. Although most types of positive life events were not associated with food security status, events involving family and other relationships had a negative association with food insecurity. Thus, interventions against food insecurity should be targeted at establishing and strengthening positive familial, community and social relationships. Advisors/Committee Members: Angela Liese.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Public Health; Food Security Status; Life Events; Households With Children; Midlands; South Carolina

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drucker, E. R. (2015). Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drucker, Erin Rebekah. “Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drucker, Erin Rebekah. “Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Drucker ER. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718.

Council of Science Editors:

Drucker ER. Food Security Status And Life Events Among Households With Children In The Midlands Of South Carolina. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/3718

3. Brittingham, Jordan. Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors.

Degree: MS, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2014, University of South Carolina

Eating identity is shown to be a promising measure capable of enhancing our understanding of nutrition behavior. Persons with healthy eating identities are less likely to consume the typical American diet and report healthier diets in general. While there are several studies linking healthy eating identity and diet, there is currently no research examining healthy eating identity in relation to food shopping behavior, an important aspect of nutritional intake. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of healthy eating identity on shopping behaviors including supermarket utilization, supercenter utilization, likelihood of shopping at the nearest store, distance to the primary store, distance between nearest and utilized store, shopping frequency, and shopping miles. A cross-sectional telephone survey of 780 household food shoppers from an eight-county region in South Carolina ascertained information on Eating Identity Type Inventory (EITI), food shopping behaviors, and demographic factors. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to generate shopping distance measures. Four general model structures were considered for linear and logistic regression analyses of each of the outcome variables. The unstandardized regression coefficient for healthy eating identity was reported for linear models, and odds ratios were reported for logistic models. There was no evidence of a significant association between healthy eating identity and the shopping behaviors of interest at the 0.05 alpha level. Though not significant, associations were positive for supermarket utilization, distance between nearest and utilized store, and shopping miles and negative for supercenter utilization and likelihood of shopping at the nearest store as expected. Findings suggest a modifying effect of urbanicity on the relationship between healthy eating identity and likelihood of shopping at the nearest store as well as distance to the primary store. The results imply that healthy eating identity may exert more of an influence on shopping behaviors in urban participants compared to non-urban participants. Studying urban and non-urban areas separately is advisable for future studies to determine whether healthy eating identity exerts a significant influence on food shopping behaviors in either of these environments. Advisors/Committee Members: Angela Liese.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Public Health; eating identity; healthy eating; self-schema; shopping

…yielded 2,477 residential listed numbers. Phone surveys were carried out by the University of… …South Carolina Survey Research Laboratory (SRL). Study participants were considered… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brittingham, J. (2014). Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/2936

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brittingham, Jordan. “Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/2936.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brittingham, Jordan. “Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Brittingham J. Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/2936.

Council of Science Editors:

Brittingham J. Examining the Influence of Healthy Eating Identity on Shopping Behaviors. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/2936

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