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You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Szeto, Kit"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.

Degree: 2019, University of Saskatchewan

Given the significance of climate models for assessing climate change impacts, and recent increases in their resolution, there is a need to understand strengths and weaknesses of climate models in reproducing key atmospheric processes, and to assess their performance using accurate ground-based observations. This thesis first investigates the inconsistencies in ground-based observations for cold environments, second, the role of ground-based observations for empirical model validation over complex terrain, and third, uses both observations and model output, to describe a mesoscale process associated with precipitation and their changes in a simulated future climate. Regional climate modelling in a convection-permitting configuration improves simulation of mesoscale systems in which convection initiates and develops, adding value to estimates of convective precipitation compared to models that rely on deep convective parameterization schemes. On the leeside of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in extratropical regions, convective precipitation is influenced by a strong longitudinal gradient of low-level moisture across the foothills. Known as the dryline, this gradient is the result of the convergence of moist air from the interior of the continent and the dry air from the subsidence on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains. The dryline plays a key role in initiating convective precipitation. To find robust answers to questions about a future transient climate, a better understanding is needed of the dryline’s relationship to the location and timing of convective initiation. This research has three objectives: 1) to critically quantify the systematic bias of precipitation measurements on two sides of the northern Canada-U.S. border since the two countries use different standard instrumentation to observe liquid and solid precipitation; 2) to study if a convection-permitting model can reproduce the warm season’s diurnal cycle of precipitation at a continental scale, and 3) to describe a mesoscale mechanism related to the initiation of convective precipitation in the Rocky Mountains vulnerable to climate change at the end of the century. Results show that a correction due to wind-undercatch in monthly solid precipitation is up to 31% during January in the Yukon, whereas across the border in Alaskan stations, it is up to 136%. This correction leads to a smaller and inverted horizontal precipitation gradient in the northern part of the border. In July, the correction for monthly liquid precipitation is around 20% in Alaska and 4% in the Yukon. This inconsistency has to be considered in any regional study using precipitation in cold and windy environments. The research to validate the precipitation diurnal cycle characteristics using a convection-permitting model, uses ground-based observations and a gridded product. Results show that the convection-permitting model can represent the main continental patterns and also represent the precipitation peak transitions from the afternoon to night on the leeside of the Rocky Mountains.… Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Yanping, Ireson, Andrew, Pomeroy, John, Wheater, Howard, Szeto, Kit.

Subjects/Keywords: Precipitation; Climate Change; Regional Climate Models; Convection Permitting Modeling; Convective precipitation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, M. L. 1. (2019). Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12243

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. “Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.” 2019. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12243.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. “Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.” 2019. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Scaff Fuenzalida ML1. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12243.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Scaff Fuenzalida ML1. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12243

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.

Degree: 2019, University of Saskatchewan

Given the significance of climate models for assessing climate change impacts, and recent increases in their resolution, there is a need to understand strengths and weaknesses of climate models in reproducing key atmospheric processes, and to assess their performance using accurate ground-based observations. This thesis first investigates the inconsistencies in ground-based observations for cold environments, second, the role of ground-based observations for empirical model validation over complex terrain, and third, uses both observations and model output, to describe a mesoscale process associated with precipitation and their changes in a simulated future climate. Regional climate modelling in a convection-permitting configuration improves simulation of mesoscale systems in which convection initiates and develops, adding value to estimates of convective precipitation compared to models that rely on deep convective parameterization schemes. On the leeside of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in extratropical regions, convective precipitation is influenced by a strong longitudinal gradient of low-level moisture across the foothills. Known as the dryline, this gradient is the result of the convergence of moist air from the interior of the continent and the dry air from the subsidence on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains. The dryline plays a key role in initiating convective precipitation. To find robust answers to questions about a future transient climate, a better understanding is needed of the dryline’s relationship to the location and timing of convective initiation. This research has three objectives: 1) to critically quantify the systematic bias of precipitation measurements on two sides of the northern Canada-U.S. border since the two countries use different standard instrumentation to observe liquid and solid precipitation; 2) to study if a convection-permitting model can reproduce the warm season’s diurnal cycle of precipitation at a continental scale, and 3) to describe a mesoscale mechanism related to the initiation of convective precipitation in the Rocky Mountains vulnerable to climate change at the end of the century. Results show that a correction due to wind-undercatch in monthly solid precipitation is up to 31% during January in the Yukon, whereas across the border in Alaskan stations, it is up to 136%. This correction leads to a smaller and inverted horizontal precipitation gradient in the northern part of the border. In July, the correction for monthly liquid precipitation is around 20% in Alaska and 4% in the Yukon. This inconsistency has to be considered in any regional study using precipitation in cold and windy environments. The research to validate the precipitation diurnal cycle characteristics using a convection-permitting model, uses ground-based observations and a gridded product. Results show that the convection-permitting model can represent the main continental patterns and also represent the precipitation peak transitions from the afternoon to night on the leeside of the Rocky Mountains.… Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Yanping, Ireson, Andrew, Pomeroy, John, Wheater, Howard, Szeto, Kit.

Subjects/Keywords: Precipitation; Climate Change; Regional Climate Models; Convection Permitting Modeling; Convective precipitation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, M. L. 1. (2019). Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12249

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. “Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.” 2019. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12249.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scaff Fuenzalida, Maria Lucia 1987-. “Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate.” 2019. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Scaff Fuenzalida ML1. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12249.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Scaff Fuenzalida ML1. Convective Precipitation over Complex Terrain, Current and Future Climate. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12249

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.