Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Jefferson, Paul G."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Saskatchewan

1. Anez, Federico. EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.).

Degree: 2013, University of Saskatchewan

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of source (experiment 1), frequency, and level (experiments 2 and 3) of energy supplementation on performance, forage utilization and intake, productivity, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility of growing beef cattle fed stockpiled forage. In experiment 1 (EXP1) and experiment 2 (EXP2), 45 cross bred yearling steers were managed on stockpiled crested wheatgrass pasture over 70 days during summer/fall of 2011 and 2012. Steers were stratified by IBW (EXP1 = 334±1.2 kg; EXP2 = 358±1.8 kg) and allocated randomly to 1 of 9 crested wheatgrass pastures (5 steers/pasture). Each pasture was randomly assigned to 1 of 3 replicated (n = 3) treatments. In EXP1, two isonitrogenous and isocaloric by-product feed pellets that differed in starch and degradable fiber content were used in one of three supplementation strategies: 1) no supplement (CON), or supplemented at 0.6 % of BW with 2) low starch/high fibre (LS/HF) pellet (40.3% starch; 29.5% NDF DM basis) pellet, or 3) high starch/low fibre (HS/LF; 48.6% starch; 22.8% NDF DM basis) pellet. In EXP2 a by-product feed pellet was formulated to provide ruminal and post-ruminal energy (30.3 % NDF; 32.0 % starch; 7.2 % fat) supplementation strategies included: 1) daily (DLY) supplementation at 0.6 % of BW, 2) low-alternate (LA) supplementation at 0.9 % of BW, and 3) high-alternate (HA) supplementation at 1.2 % of BW. There was no effect (P > 0.05) of treatment on forage utilization in either experiment. In EXP 1, final BW and ADG were not different (P > 0.05) between LS/HF (435 kg; 1.4 kg d-1) and HS/LF (439 kg; 1.5 kg d-1). However, supplemented cattle had higher (P < 0.05) final BW and ADG than CON cattle (402 kg; 1.0 kg d-1). Supplementation increased production costs by 450 %. In EXP 2, no difference (P > 0.05) was observed for final BW and ADG among DLY (435 kg; 1.1 kg d-1), LA (424 kg; 0.9 kg d-1), and HA (428 kg; 1.0 kg d-1). Production costs were reduced by 23 % with alternate supplementation and LA had 19 % less production costs than HA. In experiment three (EXP 3), four ruminally cannulated beef heifers were individually fed a stockpiled grass hay and offered the same pelleted supplement as in EXP2. Treatments consisted of 4 supplementation strategies: 1) no supplement (CON), 2) daily (DLY) supplementation at 0.6% BW, 3) low-alternate (LA) supplementation at 0.9 % of BW, and 4) high-alternate (HA) supplementation at 1.2 % of BW. Forage intake, rumen fermentation parameters, and apparent total tract digestibility were measured. Three data sets were analyzed: 1) overall (average of all collection days), 2) day of supplementation (DS) and 3) non-supplementation day (NSD) for alternating treatments. Overall, hay DMI (kg d-1) was lower (P = 0.04) for DLY (7.1) vs. CON (8.1), but no different (P ≥ 0.11) for DLY vs. LA (6.9), or vs. HA (6.4). On DS, hay DMI (kg d-1) of DLY (7.3) differed (P < 0.05) vs. HA (6.0), but was not different (P = 0.16) vs. LA (6.4). On NSD, hay DMI (kg d-1) of DLY (7.0) was not different (P ≥… Advisors/Committee Members: McKinnon, John J., Lardner, Herbert A., Penner, Greg B., Jefferson, Paul G., Buchanan, Fiona C..

Subjects/Keywords: Energy supplementation; beef cattle; stockpiled crested wheatgrass

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Anez, F. (2013). EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.). (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-09-1200

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Anez, Federico. “EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.).” 2013. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-09-1200.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Anez, Federico. “EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.).” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Anez F. EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-09-1200.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Anez F. EFFECT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTATION FROM BY-PRODUCT FEED PELLETS ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT UTILIZATION OF CATTLE GRAZING STOCKPILED CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum L.). [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-09-1200

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Anez Osuna, Federico 1976-. LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS.

Degree: 2019, University of Saskatchewan

Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of fat and the type of fatty acid (MUFA vs. PUFA) inclusion in the diet of beef cows during the pre- and postpartum period on the performance of the dam and the progeny. In study 1, replicated over three years, 36 second- and third-calving lactating Angus cows were stratified by BW (554±15.5 kg) and days postpartum (38±1.5 d), and randomly assigned to 9 paddocks (4 cows/paddock) where cows grazed cool-season grass (CSG) pastures (12.5±2.5% CP and 56.5±2.9% TDN). Each paddock was randomly assigned to one of three replicated treatments: a non-supplemented control (CON), and two supplemented (SUP) treatments where cows were offered either a canola seed (CAN) or a flaxseed (FLX) based pellet targeting 300 g/cow/d of supplemental fat (EE) over 42 d. Data were analyzed as a RCBD with contrasts for the effect of fat supplementation (CON vs. SUP) and source (CAN vs. FLX). Results indicate that CON had greater (P=0.01) forage utilization and tended (P=0.08) to have greater estimated forage DMI compared to SUP, while no difference (P≥0.76) was observed between CAN and FLX. At the end of the trial, all treatments resulted in positive ADG, maintained or increased BCS and SCFT, and reduced serum NEFA concentration with no difference (P≥0.20) among treatments. No differences (P≥0.12) were observed for pregnancy rate, calving distribution and calving to calving interval. In study 2, replicated over 2 years, 75 multiparous (≥3 calving) pregnant Angus cows were stratified by BW (663±21.5 kg) and BCS (2.6±0.12), and randomly assigned to 15 outdoor pens. Subsequently, each pen was randomly assigned to one of three (n=5) treatments: a low-fat diet (LF; 1.4±0.12% EE) and two high-fat diets (HF; 3.3±0.20% EE) which included a CAN or a FLX pelleted feeds similar to those used in study 1. Diets were formulated to meet the requirements of pregnant beef cows during the last two trimesters of gestation (183±4.8 d), and offered such that each pen on average received similar amounts of DE (31.2±2.8 Mcal/cow/d), CP (1.36±0.13 kg/cow/d), and DM (12.9±1.0 kg/cow/d). Data were analyzed as RCBD with contrasts for the effects of level (LF vs. HF) and source (CAN vs. FLX) of fat. After 160 d on trial, conceptus corrected-BW (CC-BW) of LF cows (708 kg) and the proportion of over conditioned cows (13.2%) were greater (P≤0.04) than those of HF, with no difference (P≥0.84) between CAN and FLX. Feeding FLX diet over gestation resulted in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) with greater (P≤0.01) concentration of CLnA (0.12 vs. 0.05%) and n-3 (0.58 vs. 0.37%) fatty acids, and a tendency (P=0.09) for CLA concentration (1.05 vs. 0.88%) to be greater when compared to CAN diet. By the end of gestation, serum NEFA concentration of LF cows (592 μEq/L) was lower (P<0.01) than that of HF cows, and FLX cows had greater (P<0.01) serum NEFA concentration than CAN cows (636 vs. 961 μEq/L). Cows receiving the LF diet over gestation gave birth to lighter (P≤0.01) calves compared to those receiving the HF diets (40.2 vs.… Advisors/Committee Members: McKinnon, John J, Lardner, Herbet A, Buchanan, Fiona C, Penner, Gregory B, Jefferson, Paul G, Campbell, John, Fitzsimmons, Carolyn J.

Subjects/Keywords: Beef cows; Gestation; Fat supplementation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Anez Osuna, F. 1. (2019). LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12074

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Anez Osuna, Federico 1976-. “LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS.” 2019. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12074.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Anez Osuna, Federico 1976-. “LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS.” 2019. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Anez Osuna F1. LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12074.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Anez Osuna F1. LEVEL AND SOURCE OF FAT IN THE DIET OF BEEF COWS. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12074

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.