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You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Iwaasa, Alan D."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Girardin, Lynne. Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies.

Degree: 2011, University of Saskatchewan

A two-year study (2007, 2008) was conducted to evaluate the effects of two calving systems, early (March; Early Calving System (ECS)) vs. late (June; Late Calving System (LCS)) on cow, pre-weaning calf performance and feeding system management and costs. Both early and late calving systems were managed at three locations on the Canadian Prairies: Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC)-Brandon Research Centre (Brandon, Manitoba); AAFC-Semi arid Prairie Agricultural Research Centre (Swift Current, SK); and Western Beef Development Centre (Lanigan, SK). Four feeding management systems (drylot (DL), pasture (PG), swath-windrow (SG) and bale grazing (BG)) were utilized at all three locations to maximize grazing systems. Management of animals through the four different feeding systems was found to meet or exceed protein and energy requirements according to NRC (2000). Differences in cow body weight (BW) (P=0.001; location) were observed across locations at pre-calving and weaning periods although there were no obvious patterns when comparing across calving systems. A significant three way interaction was observed for cow BW at breeding (P=0.003), and for cow body condition score (BCS) at breeding (P=0.002). Body condition score at breeding indicated there was a significant (P=0.002) three way interaction, where there were no significant interactions when comparisons across calving system within the same year (Y) and location (L) were performed for Brandon and Lanigan in 2007 and for Lanigan in 2008 also, therefore no improvements in one calving system compared to the other. At Brandon in 2007, ECS cow BCS were similar to LCS cows. In 2007 and 2008, the inverse occurred at SC where LCS cows had greater BCS compared to the ECS. The same two way (Calving System x Location) interaction was significant at pre-calving and weaning for both cow rib (P=0.003; P=0.007) and rump fat (P=0.002; P=0.02) where Lanigan had significantly lower rib and rump fat for the LCS as compared to the ECS. Rib and rump fat measurements did not follow a typical pattern. Fluctuations in body fat reserves varied depending on the calving system and location. Even though differences (P<0.05) occurred in cow BW and fat reserves, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in reproductive performance between the two calving systems within the management of the current study. Pregnancy rate, calving rate, calving span and weaning rate were similar for both early and late calving systems. In 2007, calf mortality on average was higher for LCS (5%) vs ECS (1.7%) and the inverse occurred in 2008, where LCS had lower calf mortalities than did ECS, 3.3% and 4%, respectively. Most calf mortalities were born dead or weak. There appeared to be no negative impact on calf mortality with early or late calving systems. A significant two way (Calving System x Year) interaction was observed for calf BW at birth (P=0.002) (Table 4.4). Treatment (Calving System) (P<0.0001) main effect was significant for ADG (Table 4.4). The average values for calf birth weights for… Advisors/Committee Members: Lardner, Herbert A., Iwaasa, Alan D., McKinnon, John J., Hendrick, Steve, Schmutz, Sheila, Waldner, Cheryl.

Subjects/Keywords: calving; beef cow; calf performance; cow performance; calving season

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Girardin, L. (2011). Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-08-18

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Girardin, Lynne. “Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies.” 2011. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-08-18.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Girardin, Lynne. “Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies.” 2011. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Girardin L. Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-08-18.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Girardin L. Comparison of early (March) and late (June) calving systems on cow and pre-weaning calf performance and cost of production on western Canadian Prairies. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-08-18

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Kusler, Justin P. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.

Degree: 2009, University of Saskatchewan

Diverse forage mixtures have improved resilience to drought, improved persistence, ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, reduced fertilizer costs, improved root mass and greater soil carbon sequestration but do they improve forage and animal production. The objective was to determine if complex native forage mixtures provide superior nutritional quality throughout the grazing season as compared to simple native mixtures. Three studies were conducted in 2007 at Swift Current, SK to evaluate forage production potentials, nutritive qualities and in vitro dry matter digestibility of native and tame forage species common to or having potential in Southwestern Saskatchewan. In study one, plots were seeded in 2006 on Chernozemic Orthic Brown Swinton Loam soils and consisted of 11 native and three tame monoculture species common to southwestern Saskatchewan. Clippings at a 5 cm stubble height occurred on June 20 and every 28 days after until October 10. Forage DM production, in vitro OMD, NDF, ADF, ADL, CP, Ca and P concentrations were measured. As species matured, production and OMD declined (P¡Ü0.05) but NDF, ADF and ADL concentrations increased (P¡Ü0.05). There were harvest date by species differences (P¡Ü0.05) in forage production and nutritional qualities of C3 and C4 grass and legume species. Study two examined the in situ CP, NDF and DM disappearance of six selected species harvested in the fall. EDNDF and ADDM values did not differ (P>0.05) among C3 grasses. The C4 grasses had higher (P Advisors/Committee Members: McKinnon, John J., Iwaasa, Alan D., Lardner, Herbert A., Walburger, Kenric, Laarveld, Bernard, Coulman, Bruce.

Subjects/Keywords: cool season grasses; warm season grasses; nutritive value of forages; grazing; legumes; forages; forage quality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kusler, J. P. (2009). Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kusler, Justin P. “Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.” 2009. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kusler, Justin P. “Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.” 2009. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kusler JP. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kusler JP. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.