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You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Green, Ross"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Abbott, Christina M 1986-. STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS.

Degree: 2017, University of Saskatchewan

Street checks occur when (a) a police officer engages with an individual, (b) in circumstances where the police officer does not have sufficient grounds to detain the individual, (c) the police officer elicits information from that individual, and (d) the individual’s information is stored in a police database. Street checks recently became a topic of discussion in many legal debates and in newspaper articles across Canada. Some individuals argue that street checks are conducted in a discriminatory manner and raise concerns about the constitutionality of the practice. Others argue that street checks are an important investigative tool that contributes to public safety. Unfortunately, absent from most of these debates is a discussion about the impact of street checks on youth, who are heavily targeted by the practice. Stastistics reveal that young males from racial minority groups are disproportionately targeted for police stops, and the pattern is mirrored in street check data. Some of the harmful effects of disproportionately conducting street checks on young racialized males will be considered in my thesis. In my thesis, I analyze the constitutionality of street checks using the framework of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Provisions of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms that are engaged by street checks include, but are not limited to, the right to not be arbitrarily detained, the right to silence, the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure, and the right to counsel. The Youth Criminal Justice Act occasionally offers rights and protections that overlap with those offered by the Charter, for example, the right to silence and the right to counsel; however, the Youth Criminal Justice Act also extends beyond Charter protections, by restricting the use and retention of youth records and guaranteeing the right to enhanced procedural protections. Next, I discuss the Regulations that were passed in Ontario to govern street check practices, and I analyze whether the Regulations sufficiently address the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Youth Criminal Justice Act infringements. Ultimately, I conclude that concerns continue to exist regarding the constitutionality of street checks and that street checks involving young people should be banned. It does not appear that any Regulations or policies could be passed that would allow street checks to be conducted in a manner that complies with the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Advisors/Committee Members: Buhler, Sarah, Carter, Mark, Luther, Glen, Green, Ross.

Subjects/Keywords: street checks; carding; youth; criminal; law; policing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abbott, C. M. 1. (2017). STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8098

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abbott, Christina M 1986-. “STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS.” 2017. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed July 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8098.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abbott, Christina M 1986-. “STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS.” 2017. Web. 11 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Abbott CM1. STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8098.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Abbott CM1. STREET CHECKS AND CANADIAN YOUTH: A CRITICAL LEGAL ANALYSIS. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8098

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Mackenzie, Robert Norman. Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis.

Degree: 2005, University of Saskatchewan

This thesis is an examination of the place of restorative justice in the practice of criminal law in Canada generally and in Saskatchewan in particular. It takes as its focal point the fundamental tension between traditional Anglo-Canadian Law in this area, and the newly founded practices of restorative justice. This project accepts that retribution, vengeance and proportional justice are important components of current practice. It argues that these imperatives find their place not only in practice, but also in justice system structure. This space is made both culturally and legislatively. Earlier societies are examined to develop a sense of the connection between societal norms and punitive paradigms, and an argument is made that Canada is no different from earlier societies in the way its legal values reflect the social values of the dominant settler culture. Into this analysis is then added reflections concerning the effect of colonialism on aboriginal people generally and on Canada in particular. The thesis then goes on to situate this tension specifically in current criminal justice by analysing legislation, policy, courts and practice. It examines restorative justice, and demonstrates that it has significant potential to ameliorate the deleterious effects of the colonial project on aboriginal peoples. However, it remains a marginalised practice precisely because it is an anti-colonial force in a powerful colonial justice structure. It concludes that the forces that have the inclination to change this situation have not acted to do so, and the justice system actors with the power to effect change have proven themselves to be similarly disinclined. Advisors/Committee Members: Quigley, Tim, Luther, Glen, Green, Ross, Carter, Mark.

Subjects/Keywords: Saskatchewan; restorative justice; aboriginal courts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mackenzie, R. N. (2005). Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06222007-135056

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mackenzie, Robert Norman. “Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis.” 2005. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed July 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06222007-135056.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mackenzie, Robert Norman. “Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis.” 2005. Web. 11 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Mackenzie RN. Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2005. [cited 2020 Jul 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06222007-135056.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mackenzie RN. Restorative justice in colonial Saskatchewan : an analysis. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-06222007-135056

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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