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You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Clark, Doug"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Caldwell, Krystal D 1989-. INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS.

Degree: 2017, University of Saskatchewan

Low-resource countries are disproportionately affected by infectious diseases and residents living in rural areas in these countries are more likely to experience geographic or infrastructural barriers that limit their access to formal health care or information. For health interventions in these areas to be most effective, information should be tailored for their audience and then disseminated through relevant communication channels. Interventions that utilize existing social networks and that learn about how their audiences talk about the topic of interest are more effective than those that do not. This thesis used a case study in Sri Lanka to 1) identify central actors in wildlife, livestock, and human health information networks and 2) to examine themes and topics that arise during discussions about wildlife, livestock, and human health. One-hundred and forty-three rural residents were interviewed to identify their main sources of wildlife, livestock, and human health information and to identify to whom they would report these health issues. Social network analysis of the responses revealed that government agency staff, such as the Grama Niladhari and government physicians, were the most frequently cited source of wildlife and human health information and the most common place to report health cases. A local indigenous healer was the most common source of livestock health information, the most common person to report livestock health cases to, and best positioned in each of the health networks to disseminate information and receive reports within the community. Women were more likely to be unsure of who to talk to and were considerably less likely to be nominated as a source of health information than men. Locally relevant and central leaders that are seen as key contacts for wildlife, livestock, and human health issues should be engaged and used to effectively disseminate information to and from the community. Government agencies should also engage with and maintain relationships with rural communities to facilitate information sharing. The gender differences shed light on the importance of engaging and accommodating all groups within a Sri Lankan community, perhaps by identifying group-specific opinion leaders that will appropriately communicate information to and from the group. To learn about health discussion topics, a structural topic model was used to identify main topics that emerged in 7,412 survey responses and to examine gender differences among the topics. Seven topics were identified by the topic model: 1) Cost/benefits of living near forest, 2) Reporting/asking about animal health, 3) Diseases caused by animals, 4) Wildlife visits and consequences, 5) Issues and needs of the village, 6) Village societies, and 7) medicine. There were small but significant gender differences for Topics 1-6 which indicated that men and women were spending different amounts of time on different topics. However, given the small gender effect sizes, which ranged from 0.3%-1.6%, it was concluded that gender has a… Advisors/Committee Members: Brook, Ryan, Clark, Doug, Stephen, Craig, Bharadwaj, Lalita, Krogman, Naomi.

Subjects/Keywords: social network analysis; Sri Lanka; health; disease surveillance; topic model

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caldwell, K. D. 1. (2017). INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7740

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caldwell, Krystal D 1989-. “INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS.” 2017. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7740.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caldwell, Krystal D 1989-. “INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS.” 2017. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Caldwell KD1. INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7740.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Caldwell KD1. INFORMATION SEEKING AND SHARING IN RURAL SRI LANKA: IDENTIFICATION OF CENTRAL INDIVIDUALS IN WILDLIFE, LIVESTOCK, AND HUMAN HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKS. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7740

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Olagunju, Ayodele Omoniyi. Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda.

Degree: 2016, University of Saskatchewan

Regional environmental assessment sits delicately at the intersection of assessment, land use planning, and policy-making processes. The need for improved integration among these three domains has grown especially keen recently, given the shift in the past decade toward more landscape-wide and strategic forms of environmental assessment. Paradoxically, existing works have failed to engage its complex, multi-institutional dimensions and their implications for sustainable regional environmental governance. This thesis advances work in this area by assessing the state-of-research, evaluating the state of practice, and exploring key environmental governance concepts that could better facilitate cross-domain integration in regional environmental assessment. The research draws on a mixed-method approach that includes three key methods: an in-depth literature review; a web-based survey; and semi-structured interviews. The results are presented in three manuscripts. The first manuscript details the dimensions, conceptual approaches, and a research agenda towards facilitating cross-domain integration in regional environmental assessment. The second manuscript develops a set of evaluative criteria to characterize and gauge the challenges related to cross-domain integration in regional environmental assessment as well as emergent opportunities for learning and multiple domain expertise in practice. The third manuscript reviews lessons learned from a mature regional environmental assessment case study in North America from an environmental governance perspective. Significant findings include that cross-domain integration is a phenomenon limited by institutional, transactional, and disciplinary factors, and that actors in regional environmental assessment need to explicitly recognize these divides in its design. Further, the research indicates that cross-domain integration in regional environmental assessment processes can be better facilitated by adopting an environmental governance perspective that includes strong leadership; alignment of the decision-making scales with the analytical scales; operationalizing the principle of subsidiarity; bridging, bonding, and linking via social capital; and connecting assessments to high-level decision-making contexts within a region. Moving forward, there is a pressing need for explanatory theories to support cross-domain integration in regional environmental assessment, mainstreaming an adaptive context that anticipates uncertainty and failure into the process, and expanding the discourse to a holistic context that takes into consideration the distributional effects of regional environmental impacts on wide-ranging stakeholders, including non-institutional actors such as the local communities and civil society. Advisors/Committee Members: Gunn, Jill AE, Reed, Maureen, Rayner, Jeremy, Noble, Bram, Whitelaw, Graham, Clark, Doug, Gunn, Jill A.

Subjects/Keywords: Regional environmental assessment; environmental governance; planning; policy-making; integration; institutional coordination; silo effects; evaluative framework

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olagunju, A. O. (2016). Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7357

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olagunju, Ayodele Omoniyi. “Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda.” 2016. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7357.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olagunju, Ayodele Omoniyi. “Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda.” 2016. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Olagunju AO. Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7357.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Olagunju AO. Integration of environmental assessment with planning and policy-making on a regional scale: Towards an environmental governance agenda. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7357

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Dale, Chelsea. Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir.

Degree: 2011, University of Saskatchewan

The structure of fisheries management institutions is changing all over the world, due in part to issues of sustainability related to exhaustion of resources, fiscal responsibilities, and the exercising of Aboriginal rights to access subsistence and commercial fisheries. As a result of direct action and successful legal challenges, coupled by the ongoing negotiation of modern treaties, changes in the way authority is exercised over fisheries management is occurring and co-management arrangements are being formed between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal parties. While the study of co-management arrangements is relatively recent, much has been written about their potential to manage fisheries in a sustainable manner. Located on south-eastern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, the Cowichan Valley is the historical homeland of the Cowichan Mustimuhw (people). The Cowichan Mustimuhw once controlled an elaborate salmon fishery on the Cowichan River by way of their historical fish weir. Years of conflict between Cowichan Tribes and the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) over control of the historical weir led to a significant reduction in Cowichan Mustimuhw control over their historical fishery. In 2008, the Cowichan Tribes Fish Committee (representing the interests of Cowichan members) re-vitalized the historical weir for use as a sustainable salmon management institition. The revitalized weir, and, in recent years, the multi-stakeholder Cowichan Harvest Roundtable have emerged as collaborative salmon management institutions designed to sustainably manage Cowichan River salmon harvests. While there is a body of literature devoted to the history of fisheries-related interactions between the Cowichan Tribes and DFO, there is little literature describing the Cowichan Harvest Roundtable and its role as a locally-based, collaborative salmon management institution. Through analyzing the historical Cowichan fish weir and the Cowichan Harvest Roundtable, this research will assess the efficacy of both as sustainable salmon management institutions, and explore the extent to which assertion and re-assertion of authority by the Cowichan Harvest Roundtable and Cowichan Tribes Fish Committee has occurred over the management of the fishery. The methodology for this research includes a combination of semi-structured interviews with both past and present members of the Cowichan Harvest Roundtable and Cowichan Tribes Fish Committee, and participant observation. This research provides a case study of the historical fishing weir and how it has contributed to Western management regimes, and assesses the efficacy of the Cowichan Harvest Roundtable in managing the Cowichan River salmon fishery in a sustainable manner. It is intended that this study will provide valuable information regarding Aboriginal-non-Aboriginal and community-based collaborative fisheries management institutions that can be applied to other case studies both nationally and internationally. Advisors/Committee Members: Natcher, David C., Carlson, Keith T., Clark, Doug A..

Subjects/Keywords: Cowichan River salmon management; fisheries co-management; Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK); traditional fish weir; multi-stakeholder institutions; cross-scale linkages

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dale, C. (2011). Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-09-175

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dale, Chelsea. “Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir.” 2011. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-09-175.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dale, Chelsea. “Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir.” 2011. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Dale C. Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-09-175.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Dale C. Investigating Cowichan River collaborative salmon management institutions : The Cowichan harvest roundtable and the traditional Cowichan fish weir. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2011-09-175

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.