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You searched for +publisher:"University of Saskatchewan" +contributor:("Bandara, Manjula"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Munasinghe, Chammi Sharmalie. Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.).

Degree: 2010, University of Saskatchewan

Field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.) is a cruciferous winter annual wild edible plant. It has potential medicinal properties as it contains a considerable level of glucoraphanin, which is the precursor for sulforaphane, a phase 2 protein inducer. Phase 2 proteins either directly or indirectly promote the scavenging of strong oxidants, and thus decrease the risk of many complex disorders such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. However, field pepperweed plants also contain glucosinalbin, an antinutritional compound. For field pepperweed to become a green vegetable crop or source of functional food, it is desirable to reduce or eliminate glucosinalbin. The biosynthesis of glucosinalbin may be down-regulated through biotechnology. To that end, in the present studies, experimental protocols for plant regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation have been developed for field pepperweed. Establishment of such methods represents a vital first step in the process of engineering field pepperweed for enhanced nutritional value. The effect of explant type and various combinations of growth regulators on regeneration were evaluated in three accessions of field pepperweed (Ames 13179, 13180 and 15718). Among the three genotypes, accession Ames 13179 had the highest regeneration frequency under several conditions. Regeneration from hypocotyl explants was more rapid and prolific than regeneration from either mature leaf or cotyledonary explants. Segments from the acropetal end of the hypocotyls were more regenerable than those from the basipetal end. Evaluation of different hormonal combinations and concentrations identified an optimal growth regulator combination (3 mg L-1 thidiazuron / 0.1 mg L-1 naphthalene acetic acid) for shoot induction. The plant regeneration system established was adopted for field pepperweed transformation using the acropetal segments of hypocotyls as explants. Two plant expression constructs were tested for down-regulating by RNA interference with the expression of a field pepperweed cytochrome P450 gene named LcCYP79B2. This gene may be involved in biosynthesis of glucosinalbin. Conditions for transformation such as pre-culture, co-cultivation time, and antibiotic concentration were evaluated. Transgenic plants were obtained and confirmed by histochemical staining of the reporter â-glucuranidase activity and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis of the NPTII gene. The current study has established efficient plant regeneration and transformation protocols for field pepperweed. They should be useful for future molecular biology studies and biotechnological applications in this species. Advisors/Committee Members: Wang, Hong, Juurlink, B. H. J., Ferrie, Alison, Mohamed, Adel, Waterer, Doug, Bandara, Manjula.

Subjects/Keywords: Field pepperweeed; Lepidium campestre; Transformation; Glucoraphanin; Regeneration

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APA (6th Edition):

Munasinghe, C. S. (2010). Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.). (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09162010-220916

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Munasinghe, Chammi Sharmalie. “Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.).” 2010. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09162010-220916.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Munasinghe, Chammi Sharmalie. “Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.).” 2010. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Munasinghe CS. Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09162010-220916.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Munasinghe CS. Development of plant regeneration and transformation techniques towards reducing glucosinalbin biosynthesis in field pepperweed (Lepidium campestre L.). [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09162010-220916

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Song, Xin. The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers.

Degree: 2009, University of Saskatchewan

Sprout control is essential for successful management of stored potatoes. This study examined the effect of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oils on sprouting of potatoes. Extracts of steam distilled dill weed whole plants containing 41.5-42.7% of S-(+)-carvone and spearmint foliage extracts containing 97.2-97.6% of R-(-)-carvone, were applied to tubers in a series of experiments using either 1-L glass jars or 63-L steel drums. The composition of the essential oils was consistent between years but evaporation rate varied among the oils as dill weed extract evaporated the fastest while clove oil evaporated the slowest under the same conditions. After exposure to essential oil treatments, tuber sprout number and weight were assessed and compared to untreated control and tubers treated with commercially marketed clove oil product (Biox-CTM, containing 78.5-82.3% eugenol). Applications of 32.5 and 47.6 mg L-1 headspace of dill weed oil and 21.5 and 22.3 mg L-1 headspace of spearmint oil achieved 50% reduction in 'Russet Burbank' sprout weight and sprout number respectively, 30 days after the initial treatment. Tubers stored in environments with 60-240 mg L-1 headspace of dill weed or spearmint oils suppressed sprouting at least 5 weeks longer than that of the controls. In 63-L steel drums, repeated dill and spearmint oil vapor treatments effectively and consistently suppressed sprouting of 'Russet Norkotah' and 'Piccolo' tubers for 7-8 months when doses were 25 mg L-1 headspace or higher and when treatments were repeated at least every four weeks. Within this range, sprout suppression was not sensitive to treatment variations, and, therefore, an optimal treatment level could not be determined. Clove oil was less effective in suppressing sprouting, likely due to its slower vaporization compared to dill and spearmint oils. Essential oil treatment effects on seed tuber viability were evaluated on 'Piccolo'. Tubers were planted after exposure to dill or spearmint oil vapor environments ranging from 15-240 mg L-1 headspace for seven days. There were no adverse effects on seed viability at doses less than 120 mg L-1 headspace. Although environments with Advisors/Committee Members: Tanino, Karen, Neeser, Chris, Coulman, Bruce, Reaney, Martin, Gray, Gordon, Bandara, Manjula.

Subjects/Keywords: storage; potato; Essential oil; carvone; eugenol; sprout suppression

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Song, X. (2009). The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-11302009-214226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Song, Xin. “The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers.” 2009. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-11302009-214226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Song, Xin. “The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers.” 2009. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Song X. The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-11302009-214226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Song X. The impact of dill weed, spearmint and clove essential oil on sprout suppression in potato tubers. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-11302009-214226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Lokuruge, Prabhath. Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier.

Degree: 2013, University of Saskatchewan

Chickpea production in the short growing season of the Canadian Prairies is still a challenging task due to excessive and continuous vegetative growth which often results in severe yield and quality reduction. This study examined the effects of three plant growth retardants (PGR), Chlormequat Chloride (CCC), Prohexadione Calcium and Trinexapac Ethyl applied during flowering stage on vegetative growth, seed quality, yield and crop maturity of the Kabuli chickpea cultivar CDC Frontier. Field experiments were conducted at Brooks and Bow Island in southern Alberta in the 2010 and 2011 growing seasons. Four concentrations of each PGR were applied at 10, 20 and 30 days after flowering (DAF) stages. During the 2010 growing season the crop experienced above average moist and cooler temperature conditions. In contrast, later half of the 2011 growing season was above average dry and hot. None of the three PGR tested in this study had a significant effect on plant height at 30 days after treatments or on above ground biomass plant-1 at harvest. Application of PGR had no significant effects on the number of seeds m-2, except at the Brooks rain-fed site in 2011 where the PGR treatment applied at 10 and 20 DAF increased the number of seeds m-2 at harvest. An increase of 1000-seed weight of marketable seeds was obtained with Prohexadione Calcium and Trinexapac Ethyl applications at Bow Island, but the effects were not consistent across sites and years. Results suggested that the effect of PGR on 1000-seed weight of marketable seeds mainly depended upon the growing environment and the type of PGR. In general, PGR applications reduced the total and marketable seed yields. Application of Prohexadione Calcium and Trinexapac Ethyl at the Bow Island site delayed crop maturity in 2011. In contrast, the application of CCC at 6000 mg L-1 at 20 DAF accelerated crop maturity at the Brooks irrigated site in 2011. In addition to this main study, the potential effects of Pyraclostrobin and Prothioconazole fungicides on the activities of the three PGR were compared by a separate experiment conducted at the Brooks irrigated site in 2011. The results of that study revealed that there were no significant differences in the effects of PGR on chickpea vegetative growth, seed yield parameters and maturity when they were applied as a mixture with either Pyraclostrobin or Prothioconazole fungicide. In summary, results revealed that PGR applied during flowering stage were not effective on controlling vegetative growth of chickpea and did not improve seed yield and crop maturity. Their effects on yield-related traits were highly inconsistent. Thus, it can be concluded that the application of PGR is not a reliable agronomic option to handle the production issues associated with continues vegetative growth at the late reproductive stage of the chickpea cultivar CDC Frontier under the western Canadian growing conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Bandara, Manjula, Taran, Bunyamin, Coulman, Bruce, Bueckert, Rosalind A., Banniza, Sabine.

Subjects/Keywords: Chickpea; Maturity; Seed Quality; Plant Growth Retardants; Indeterminate Growth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lokuruge, P. (2013). Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1101

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lokuruge, Prabhath. “Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier.” 2013. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed August 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1101.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lokuruge, Prabhath. “Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier.” 2013. Web. 24 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Lokuruge P. Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1101.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lokuruge P. Evaluation of The Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Vegetative Growth, Yield Components, Seed Quality And Crop Maturity of The Kabuli Chickpea Cultivar CDC Frontier. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2013-06-1101

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.