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You searched for +publisher:"University of Regina" +contributor:("Anderson, Brenda"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Manweiller, Shallin Kyldii. Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation .

Degree: 2017, University of Regina

Academic investigations of ‘ritual’ and ‘religion’ have at times conflated each with the other. Within modern academic study, there is emerging research that attempts to decouple this association by underscoring the importance of processes of ritualization—the specific ways humans elevate actions and thought processes to importance—on identity-making and social participation. Through a combination of literature review and analysis of current social and legal issues, this thesis looks at the construction of space on three levels—the experienced, perceived, and imagined—in an effort to show that ritual, community, and identity are shaped and constrained more by economic and social influence and the administrative adjudication of the state than by authority invested in the religious sphere. This suggests that the historical pattern of linking ‘ritual’ with ‘religion’ erases perceptions of how ritualization occurs in other social areas and affects the ability to recognize new forms of ritualization as they develop. This thesis begins with an effort to trouble the historical association between ‘ritual’ and ‘religion’ through an investigation into how human cognition shapes language, which in turn shapes human expectation and experience. The second chapter offers an analysis of intersections of law, church, and state to illustrate how exercises in authority legitimate forms of ritualization that perpetuate existing hegemonic structures. The third chapter comprises an investigation of how the politics of marginalization and exclusion shape the accessibility of the ritualizations of the public sphere. The fourth and final chapter explores how highly customizable corporate spaces can be rented and transformed into temporary sites of ritualization that serve to both segregate and spur social identity-making. This project concludes that ritualizations serve to arbitrate social space and the status quo and do so whether or not an individual is aware they are occurring. As a result of this, I propose the investigation and comprehension of ritual use and emergence may benefit from reconceiving the categories employed to structure such undertakings. Such reconstruction could assist with decoupling the historical association of ‘ritual’ with ‘religion’, invite further consideration on the social value of ‘ritual’ and ‘religion’, and stir interest in emerging and evolving ritualizations. While I suggest some categories that may facilitate different entry points into reclassification, further research would be necessary to see if this strategy would be provocative. Advisors/Committee Members: Bond, Kevin (advisor), Arnal, William (advisor), Anderson, Brenda (committeemember).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Manweiller, S. K. (2017). Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation . (Thesis). University of Regina. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10294/8483

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manweiller, Shallin Kyldii. “Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation .” 2017. Thesis, University of Regina. Accessed November 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10294/8483.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manweiller, Shallin Kyldii. “Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation .” 2017. Web. 15 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Manweiller SK. Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Regina; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10294/8483.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Manweiller SK. Dogma, Dada, and Disneyland: Investigating the Impact of Space on Ideological Formation . [Thesis]. University of Regina; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10294/8483

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Antifaiff, Gloria Lynn. Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry .

Degree: 2016, University of Regina

My research puzzle for this narrative inquiry is about senior administrators in school divisions (re)composing stories to live by during a period of heightened accountability to improve student achievement. As this study unfolds, Clandinin and Connelly’s (2000) understanding of a narrative inquiry approach is used to explore research puzzles, wonders, and new learning. This study begins with my experiences as a senior administrator on the educational landscape and explores my puzzles about improving student achievement in school divisions. My wonders centre on questions such as: How do we demonstrate improved student achievement for all students? Do we all agree on what improved student achievement is? How do I find balance with what I believe about learning, and achieve what is expected of me in the role of a senior administrator in a school division? How have my experiences shaped my professional identity, and who I am as a senior administrator? Do senior administrators in school divisions (re)compose stories to live by as their professional identity evolves and leadership skills develop? The participants in this study are three senior administrators from school divisions: Barbara, Alice, and me. Field texts were collected throughout the study in the form of artefacts, audio recordings, documentation notes, personal field notes, and chronicles. Eventually I moved from field texts to interim texts, and I integrated literature about narrative inquiry, educational leadership, professional identity, colonization, and teacher education. Narrative accounts were created for each of the participants. As the narrative accounts, literature, and relevant field texts were interwoven from interim to research texts, six story threads resonated: being a member of the colonizing dominant group, shifting professional identity, re(composing) stories to live by, becoming awakening to the lives of children and youth, school reform, and the shaping presence of dominant institutional narratives. This dissertation shares the narrative understanding of the author and two participants about their experience of being senior administrators through the narratives they create to understand those experiences. It creates hope for additional research in educational leadership and senior administration using a narrative inquiry methodology. Advisors/Committee Members: Couros, Alec (advisor), Lewis, Patrick (committeemember), Tupper, Jennifer (committeemember), Anderson, Brenda (committeemember).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Antifaiff, G. L. (2016). Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry . (Thesis). University of Regina. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10294/7679

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Antifaiff, Gloria Lynn. “Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry .” 2016. Thesis, University of Regina. Accessed November 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10294/7679.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Antifaiff, Gloria Lynn. “Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry .” 2016. Web. 15 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Antifaiff GL. Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Regina; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10294/7679.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Antifaiff GL. Senior Administrators in School Divisions (Re)Composing Stories to Live By: A Narrative Inquiry . [Thesis]. University of Regina; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10294/7679

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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