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You searched for +publisher:"University of Otago" +contributor:("Theis, Jean-Claude"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Melloh, Markus. Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

Low back pain (LBP) is by far the most prevalent and costly musculoskeletal problem in our society today. Most people experience an episode of LBP at least once in their lifetime. Some of them go on to develop persistent LBP. The aim of this thesis is to identify predictors for persistent LBP in patients suffering from acute LBP. In a systematic review screening instruments were identified showing for psychological and occupational factors the highest reliability regarding the prognosis of patients with LBP. Following the recommendations of the Multinational Musculoskeletal Inception Cohort Study (MMICS) Statement, a study protocol was developed to detect patient characteristics which increase the risk of chronicity, and to reveal the best time point for identifying patients at risk of developing persistent LBP. Acute LBP patients were recruited from general practitioner clinics in New Zealand, and assessed by postal survey at baseline and at three, six, twelve-week and six-month follow-up. Primary outcome was functional limitation measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); key secondary endpoints were pain on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and general health measured by the acute Short Form 12 (SF-12). A feasibility study was conducted of patients who had attended a health practitioner for either their first episode of acute LBP, or recurrent LBP with at least thirty LBP-free days between two episodes. The index ‘depression and maladaptive cognitions’ was found to be a significant baseline-predictor for persistent LBP up to six months. In the main study time-related LBP characteristics correlated with prognostic factors for acute/ subacute LBP. Further findings demonstrated that patients with current LBP waiting longer till seeking care had a more disadvantageous profile of psychological and occupational risk factors, and lower resource levels. A final four-predictor model for persistent LBP, defined by functional limitation at six months included ‘resigned attitude towards the job’ and ‘social support at work’ as the strongest prognostic factors; a final two-predictor model for persistent LBP defined by pain at six months revealed ‘social support at work’ as the strongest prognostic factor. The best time points to predict the development of persistent LBP at six months were the six and twelve-week follow-up. When considering resources for preventing persistent LBP, at twelve weeks ‘social support’ was confirmed as a strong occupational protective factor – similar to findings at six months. The presence of ‘depression’ had a negative influence on the course of recovery in patients presenting with acute/ subacute LBP. ‘Depression’ together with ‘job control’ and ‘functional limitation’ were also baseline-predictors of sickness absence with the strongest prediction made at six-week follow-up. If these findings are to be applied to screen patients at risk of developing persistent LBP, the next stage of research requires a validation of the results in the target population, a new sample of acute/ subacute… Advisors/Committee Members: Theis, Jean-Claude (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Back pain; Prognosis; Risk factors; Resources; Primary care

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APA (6th Edition):

Melloh, M. (2012). Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2205

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melloh, Markus. “Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2205.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melloh, Markus. “Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care .” 2012. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Melloh M. Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2205.

Council of Science Editors:

Melloh M. Predicting the transition from acute to persistent low back pain in primary care . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2205


University of Otago

2. Jepegnanam, Thilak Samuel. Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

ABSTRACT Background: Sudden, peri-operative cardiovascular deterioration with decreased systemic arterial pressure and increased pulmonary arterial pressure is a potentially fatal complication of orthopaedic surgery, due to fat embolism. In this situation pulmonary vasodilation is an attractive treatment option and this was studied using the drug sildenafil. Methods: Bone cement (polymethylmethacrylate) was injected into bilateral femora in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Systemic blood pressure, pulmonary arterial pressures and EEG (electro-encephalogram) were recorded till 60 minutes after the orthopaedic procedure. Twenty minutes before cement injection, 6 animals received 5 mg/kg of sildenafil which was injected through the intraperitoneal route and 6 received saline delivered similarly. After euthanasia, the lungs were used for imaging studies with micro-CT (micro-computed tomography). Post-mortem lung and brain biopsies were taken for semi-quantitative analysis of intravascular fat. Results: Fat embolism was associated with an increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure. In the sildenafil group pulmonary arterial pressures remained below baseline values except for a transient period of few seconds following cement pressurisation. There was statistically significant decrease in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (p=0.037) after administration of sildenafil and after injection of cement (p=0.025) in the experimental group as opposed to control. There was no significant difference in the number of fat emboli in the lungs of both groups. There was a statistically significant significant increased lung perfusion in the sildenafil group as measured by micro-CT (micro-computed tomography) (p=0.0425). The EEG was not different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Administration of sildenafil appeared to ameliorate the acute cardiovascular complications of fat embolism in the rat model. Advisors/Committee Members: Theis, Jean-Claude (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: sildenafil; fat embolism; rat; animal study; arthroplasty

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jepegnanam, T. S. (2012). Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2187

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jepegnanam, Thilak Samuel. “Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model .” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2187.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jepegnanam, Thilak Samuel. “Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model .” 2012. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Jepegnanam TS. Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2187.

Council of Science Editors:

Jepegnanam TS. Sildenafil in the treatment of fat embolism: a rat model . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2187

3. Kieser, David Christopher. Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics .

Degree: 2014, University of Otago

We have just survived the most violent century in history. Ballistic skeletal injuries continue to kill or injure hundreds of thousands of people globally every year and yet our knowledge of these injuries remains incomplete. The aim of this thesis is to analyze some of the orthopedic, biomechanics and forensic aspects of ballistic skeletal injuries to better understand their clinical significance and optimal management. In doing we cover aspects of bacterial contamination and cellular survival around direct ballistic fractures. We also analyze indirect and remote ballistic femoral fractures. From a biomechanics perspective we analyze how bone breaks when impacted by a projectile and what energy transfer is involved. And from a forensic perspective we analyze the morphology of bony wounds and describe a technique for identifying a bullet from the bullet wipe. Advisors/Committee Members: Theis, Jean-Claude (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Gunshot; bullet; fracture; gelatine; bullet wipe; animal model; contamination; cellular viability; gunshot residue; energy transfer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kieser, D. C. (2014). Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4601

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kieser, David Christopher. “Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics .” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4601.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kieser, David Christopher. “Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics .” 2014. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Kieser DC. Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4601.

Council of Science Editors:

Kieser DC. Ballistic Skeletal Injuries: An Experimental Study of the Orthopaedic, Biomechanic and Forensic Characteristics . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4601

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