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You searched for +publisher:"University of Otago" +contributor:("McGuire, Mark"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

The New Zealand landmass encompasses a vast diversity of wilderness areas, including fourteen national parks and other conservation lands. These natural environments attract a large number of domestic and international visitors, who consult a many different sources of on-line and printed information before and during their visit. However, these resources are usually designed to suit a generic visitor, and take no account of the different needs and expectation of diverse individuals. In this thesis, I investigate the use of information resources by different users groups as categorized by the Wilderness Perception Scaling (WPS) method. I begin with a review of relevant studies and statistics relating to domestic and international visitors’ experiences of the New Zealand wilderness. I then report on the results of my direct observations of visitors to three destinations, and I discuss the findings that I gathered from surveys that I conducted in two of these locations. This work includes pilot studies of two sites — the Catlins Conservation Park and the Orokonui Ecosanctuary — and a more detailed study of Arthur’s Pass National Park. Following a discussion of my observations and findings, I argue for a redesign of the Department of Conservation (DOC) Website, and I present sketch ideas for a new site that is informed by mobile media interface designs. This work hints at future possibilities for smartphone applications. I conclude that current technologies allow us to address the needs and expectations of different visitors to wilderness areas. Furthermore, I argue that mobile media can enable individuals to create and share, as well as download and use, information resources that address their various and different requirements. I conclude that, if we want younger people to engage with wilderness environments, we should be using the technologies that they are using. Advisors/Committee Members: McGuire, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: WPS; Wilderness; Perceptions; Smartphone; application; DOC; website; domestic; international; visitors; statistics; tourism; carla; vieira; design; icons; iphone; mobile; socila; network; feedback; sharing; information; experiences; environments; conervation; backpack; iSite; Visitor; Centre; Trampers; Non-Purist; Moderate-Purist; Neutralist-Purist; Strong-Purist; Stankey; Kearsley; Lovelock; Highman; Wolch; Tinsley; Recreation; Orokonui-Ecosanctuary; Catlins; Outdoor-recreation; Klisley; Ho; Carr-Williams; Satisfaction; Arthur's Pass; New Zealand; National Park

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, C. C. (2012). Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

Council of Science Editors:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548


University of Otago

2. Fersterer, Christopher Karl. Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity .

Degree: University of Otago

This research explores the relationship between domestic dwellings, nature and natural environments. I propose that, in order to develop environmental conservation values, individuals must feel some sense of connection to, or lack of separation from, the environment. The places where people reside is where they likely will have a stronger sense of connection and how they live will further mediate this connection. The research considers how vernacular building styles and construction practices influence engagement with the natural environment. I begin by identifying design elements of huts and baches within natural environments. These structures are considered as a New Zealand vernacular, and their design language is thought to have potential applications that may provide value in contemporary urban architectural design. The study of predominantly small scaled and modest structures also provides a counterpoint to the large scale dwellings prevalent in many urban subdivisions, where relationships with natural systems often appear diminished. It is here where the issue can be seen as a wicked problem, where the wants and needs of the individual conflict with the preservation of environmental systems, as is evident with uncompromised domestic sprawl. The most significant observations from this thesis are drawn from a series of case studies with participants who had demonstrated a strong sense of attachment to their homes and their natural settings, and who had been involved in the design and development of these homes. I found that the case study participants had made specific connections to the natural settings where they had chosen to live and the design and/or construction of their homes had them respond to these settings. Memories and past experiences, which included references to huts and baches, but also to dining and socialising, informed many of their design decisions. The act of designing or conceptualising their homes encouraged them to respond to a range of issues determined by their sites and past experiences. The interview process encouraged them to express these issues and they were able to identify specific choices they had made with respect to a series of influences. For these participants’ owner involvement in design or development of their home and land helped to reinforce meaningful attachments to the environment, and that this, for some, was a reflection of concern for wider environmental issues. Consequently, the development of tools or practices that encourage deeper participation by owners in the design of their homes may prove effective in shifting views to accommodate new values of environment preservation. Advisors/Committee Members: McGuire, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Architectural; design; place; environment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fersterer, C. K. (n.d.). Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fersterer, Christopher Karl. “Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fersterer, Christopher Karl. “Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity .” Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Fersterer CK. Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Fersterer CK. Architectural design and the Development of Place Attachment & Identity . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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