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You searched for +publisher:"University of Otago" +contributor:("Higham, Charles F. W"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Leach, B. Foss. Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand .

Degree: 2009, University of Otago

A programme of archaeological research was undertaken in the Wairarapa region on the northern shores of Cook Strait, New Zealand. Some 27 excavations conducted during a 3 year period were designed primarily to examine prehistoric economy and settlement pattern in the region. In addition, studies were made of early historical records of Māori life, Māori traditional history, and aspects of the modern and prehistoric enviroment. In the analysis of excavated material, particular attention was given to physical anthropology, subsistence economy, and the trading patterns revealed by the importation of a number of rock types from elsewhere in New Zealand. It was found that human occupation in Palliser Bay was most intense from about 1150AD to 1400AD, and that significant depopulation may have occurred by 1650AD. At least 6 kinship linked communities were resident in this early period, probably originating from further north. Over several centuries thay strengthened their social ties with other communities in Cook Strait, progressively losing contact with northern areas. A conjunctive picture is reconstructed of a typical community of 30 to 40 people, and aspects of their physical condition, economy, technology, settlement pattern, external social relationships and ideology described. Their economy was initially a balance between hunter-gatherer pursuits and kumara-based horticulture, but in the course of time their forest clearing activities set into motion a series of episodes of erosion which culminated in the development of broad shingle river beds and active fans. High riverine sediment loads led to the loss of much of the local marine fauna at river mouths. A general climatic deterioration about 1450AD and then from 1600 onwards accelerated this process to render the enviroment largely unsuitable to Polynesian habitation. It is argued that coupled to these changes are settlement pattern modifications and an increase in human disease and malnutrition. Advisors/Committee Members: Higham, Charles F. W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Maori; antiquities; excavations; archaeology; Wairarapa

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APA (6th Edition):

Leach, B. F. (2009). Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/499

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Leach, B Foss. “Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand .” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/499.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Leach, B Foss. “Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand .” 2009. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Leach BF. Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/499.

Council of Science Editors:

Leach BF. Prehistoric communities in Palliser Bay, New Zealand . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/499


University of Otago

2. Leach, B. Foss. The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages .

Degree: University of Otago

The concept of similarity has occupied a key position in the interpretation of archaeological evidence since Thomson's Three Age System was formulated (Thomsen, 1836). Indeed, the writing of prehistory demands the use of this concept in relating evidence from stratigraphically distant horizons. Taylor, however, not only argued that too much emphasis could be placed on this comparative approach, but also claimed that it could be detrimental to the full recovery of archaeological information (W.W. Taylor, 1948). A similar dissatisfaction in Britain prompted Clark (1964, 1966, 1967) to adopt a 'conjunctive approach' (W.W. Taylor, 1948:7) exemplified in their work as economic prehistorians. This reappraisal however, has increased rather than diminished the need for procedured designed to relate assemblages in cultural terms. While the development of methods of analysis which assess the similarity between comparable items of different assemblages proceeds, it is stressed that sound theoretical principles, whereby the results of such analyses may be interpreted in the most plausible manner, must be adopted. Indeed it is urged that the common assumption that the degree of cultural similarity is directly proportional to the formal similarity, is by no means universally valid. Considerable advances have recently been made in developing techniques to identify formal relationships by establishing the degree of 'proximity' between different assemblages of information. The ancillary problem of interpreting results in cultural terms has received relatively less attention. This dissertation considers the application of methods of 'proximity' analysis to specific New Zealand assemblages, together with a discussion of the problems encountered in interpretation. The general implications of this research for prehistoric studies will also be considered. [Introduction] Advisors/Committee Members: Higham, Charles F. W (advisor).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Leach, B. F. (n.d.). The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8267

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Leach, B Foss. “The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8267.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Leach, B Foss. “The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages .” Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Leach BF. The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8267.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Leach BF. The concept of similarity in prehistoric studies : a test case using New Zealand stone flake assemblages . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8267

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.


University of Otago

3. Chetwin, James Nicholas. War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand .

Degree: University of Otago

The role of warfare in prehistoric Thai lifeways has been a topic of debate, although no studies have specifically sought to investigate and explain prehistoric warfare in Thailand. Recent advocacy of the heterarchic paradigm has sought to de-emphasise the role of warfare in sociopolitical change. This thesis seeks to develop a regional understanding of structured violence in Thai prehistory by developing a specific preliminary model for military behaviour in a heterarchic milieu. An overview of definitions and anthropological theory on war is offered, as these issues are crucial to the debate over warfare in prehistoric Thailand. A methodology of military archaeology is developed and utilised to assess the evidence for warfare in the Thai Bronze and Iron Ages. Direct evidence for warfare in the Bronze Age is lacking, while the transition to the Iron Age is concomitant with a variety of changes in military technology and behaviour. There is evidence that warfare was a factor in the social environment of prehistoric Thailand. Though comparative data show that it was not as intense or specialised as that practised by the Dian and Dong Son cultures of northern Southeast Asia. A nonlinear model is proposed to account for the role of warfare in regionally specific historical hypotheses. The model is designed specifically to allow the construction of testable hypotheses in a heterarchic paradigm. Advisors/Committee Members: Higham, Charles F. W (advisor).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chetwin, J. N. (n.d.). War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chetwin, James Nicholas. “War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chetwin, James Nicholas. “War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand .” Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Chetwin JN. War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8270.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Chetwin JN. War before Angkor: the evidential and theoretical context of warfare in prehistoric Thailand . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8270

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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