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You searched for +publisher:"University of Otago" +contributor:("Court, Sue"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Burns, Robert G. H. Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music .

Degree: 2010, University of Otago

From a mixed methodology perspective that includes ethnology, musicology and cultural anthropology, I argue that, despite initial detachment from folk revivalism, English folk–rock has moved closer to aspects of tradition and historical status and has embraced a revivalist stance similar to that of the folk revivals that occurred earlier in the twentieth century. Whereas revivalism often rejects manifestations of mass culture and modernity, I also argue that the early combinations of folk music and rock music demonstrated that aspects of preservation and commercialisation have always co–existed within this hybrid musical style. English folk–rock, a former progressive rock music style, has emerged in the post–punk era as a world music style that appeals to a broad spectrum of music fans and this audience does not regard issues such as maintenance of authenticity and tradition as key factors in the preservation process. Rock music has remained a stimulus for further change in folk music and has enabled English folk–rock to become regarded as popular music by a new audience with diverse musical tastes. When folk music was adapted into rock settings, the result represented a particular identity for folk music at that time. In a similar way, as folk music continues to be amalgamated with rock and other popular music styles, or is performed in musical settings representing new cultures and ethnicities now present in the United Kingdom, it becomes updated and relevant to new audiences. From this perspective, I propose that growth in the popularity of British folk music since the early 1970s can be linked to its performance as English folk–rock, to its connections with culture and music industry marketing and promotion techniques, and to its inclusion as a 1990s festival component presented to audiences as part of what is promoted as world music. Popularity of folk music presented at world music festivals has stimulated significant growth in folk music audiences since the mid–1990s and consequently the UK is experiencing a new phase of revivalism – the third folk revival. Advisors/Committee Members: Court, Sue (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Englishness; folk–rock; folk music; British national identity; tradition; rock music; music innovation; musical change; progressive rock; British folk movement; Great Britain; history and criticism; popular music

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APA (6th Edition):

Burns, R. G. H. (2010). Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/451

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burns, Robert G H. “Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/451.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burns, Robert G H. “Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music .” 2010. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Burns RGH. Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/451.

Council of Science Editors:

Burns RGH. Transforming Folk: Innovation and Tradition in English Folk–Rock Music . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/451


University of Otago

2. Murray, David Russell. Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro .

Degree: 2010, University of Otago

This work examines the life of Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945), an Italian maestro who was a leading musician in the city of Dunedin, New Zealand, from 1889 until his retirement in 1933. Squarise worked as a professional in a predominantly amateur musical environment, and this thesis demonstrates his widely-felt presence and discernible influence in Dunedin’s cultural life, through his activities as a violinist, teacher, conductor, and composer. Furthermore, it illustrates the nature of the active musical culture in Dunedin, through Squarise’s participation in established local practices and the contrast provided by the ‘otherness’ of his Italian ethnicity. The thesis shows that a two-way adaptive process took place between Squarise and the Dunedin community, as each engaged with the unfamiliar culture of the other. The success of Squarise’s musical career in the antipodes, it is argued, was based upon his willingness to adapt to the cultural, intellectual, and musical environment of his adopted home. The method used in this study is that of interpretative biography: it conveys the experience of the individual while emphasizing context through the subject’s interaction with his environment. The sources of the research are mainly archival, and include Squarise’s personal papers, newspapers, the archives of local music organizations, and music ephemera. These are augmented by interviews undertaken with some of the few people (nearly sixty years since his death) who knew Squarise. The thesis is a study of the public more than the private man, but the sources are extensive enough to provide a thorough representation of Squarise’s professional activities. Advisors/Committee Members: Court, Sue (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Musicians – New Zealand – Dunedin – Biography; Composers – New Zealand – Dunedin – Biography; Musicians – South Australia – Adelaide – Biography

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Murray, D. R. (2010). Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/346

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murray, David Russell. “Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/346.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murray, David Russell. “Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro .” 2010. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Murray DR. Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/346.

Council of Science Editors:

Murray DR. Raffaello Squarise (1856-1945): The Colonial Career of an Italian Maestro . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/346


University of Otago

3. Chapman, Ian C. David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret .

Degree: 2010, University of Otago

David Bowie is regarded as a unique and pivotal performer within the field of popular music but little attempt has been made thus far to place his performance style in context. Most research that has been carried out is confined to the broad area of popular music studies in spite of the fact that Bowie has acknowledged considerable debt to disciplines outside his own, such as theatre. I argue that the most compelling precedent to Bowie’s performance style and artistic rationale is, as he alludes to, found within the discipline of theatre, and in particular in Berlin cabaret during the first three decades of the twentieth century. This research examines a clearly defined period during Bowie’s career – his ‘glam rock’ period encompassing the years 1972-1974 – and analyses critical aspects of his performance style and artistic rationale. The thesis is based upon a comparison between Bowie’s style and that of Berlin cabaret, with the aim of establishing common ground between the two. Findings support an argument that Bowie appropriated aspects of Berlin cabaret and applied them to his performances during the glam rock era. These findings provide insights into the artistic rationale and performance style of this pivotal performer, identifying the manner in which he expanded the artistic palette that was readily absorbed into the popular music culture of the 1970s. Advisors/Committee Members: Court, Sue (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Rock music; Theatre; Performance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chapman, I. C. (2010). David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/454

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chapman, Ian C. “David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret .” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/454.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chapman, Ian C. “David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret .” 2010. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Chapman IC. David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/454.

Council of Science Editors:

Chapman IC. David Bowie: Life is a Cabaret . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/454

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