Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Oklahoma" +contributor:("Vaughn, Caryn C"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Oklahoma

1. Allen, Daniel. Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Oklahoma

In my third chapter, I investigate how mussel biodiversity can increase the flow of resources from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems via a complex trophic cascade. Mussel biodiversity increases algae production in streams, which is followed by increases in abundance of grazing aquatic insect larvae. Because aquatic insects are an important prey subsidy to terrestrial predators, I conducted experiments to see if mussel biodiversity increases the flux of aquatic insect prey subsidies to terrestrial predators. In a mesocosm experiment I found that mussel species richness was associated with an increase in algae production rates, aquatic insect emergence rates, and spider standing crop biomass. Effects of mussel polycultures on algae production could be predicted additively from monocultures, and mussel effects were linked through stable isotope analyses to mussel-derived nitrogen subsidies. In contrast, certain mussel species mixtures had non-additive effects on insect emergence. Mussel polycultures were associated with a more evenly distributed algae community than mussel monocultures, and aquatic insect emergence rates were higher in these more mixed algal assemblages. Finally spider standing crop biomass weakly tracked increases in aquatic insect emergence. In a field study of mussel communities on 2 rivers we found that sites with greater mussel species richness had higher aquatic insect emergence rates. These results show that because food webs in adjacent ecosystems are linked, effects of biodiversity losses on ecosystem functioning are not limited to the ecosystem in which extinctions occur. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaughn, Caryn C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biodiversity; Freshwater mussels – Oklahoma; Ecosystem management; Environmental modeling; Landscape ecology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Allen, D. (2011). Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319035

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allen, Daniel. “Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319035.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allen, Daniel. “Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels.” 2011. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Allen D. Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319035.

Council of Science Editors:

Allen D. Integrating biodiversity and landscape ecosystem processes: tests with freshwater mussels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319035


University of Oklahoma

2. Atkinson, Carla Lee. Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Oklahoma

As natural ecosystems become increasingly changed due to habitat alteration, species loss, introduction of non-native species, and climate change, understanding the functional significance of communities to ecosystem function has become imperative. Consequently, recent research has focused on how landscape scale processes influence the distribution of organisms and the influence of organisms on ecosystem function. Freshwater ecosystems are especially sensitive to changes on the landscape because everything that occurs on the land is reflected in the receiving watershed and because of this these ecosystems are subject to declines in native biodiversity that far exceed most terrestrial ecosystems. Approximately half of North American freshwater mussels, a third of crayfishes, a fourth of amphibians, and one fifth of freshwater fishes and gastropods are considered imperiled. This makes research in aquatic freshwater ecosystems essential for understanding the biodiversity of this planet and the linkages between biodiversity and ecosystem function. Linkages between spatial distributions of animals and ecological stoichiometric theory provide a framework for understanding and predicting these linkages. This dissertation shows that examination of spatial patterns in community composition and examination of the role of these communities reveals unknown patterns, interactions, and linkages within stream communities and biogeochemical cycling. Chapter one examined the variables that impact patterns of mussel community composition and showed that stream size and watershed slope are both predictive of community assemblage patterns. The linkages between food webs and nutrient cycles are heterogeneous and often influenced by human activities. Chapter two shows that long-lived mussels integrate agricultural land use in the basin in their tissue as reflected by enriched 15N of their tissue with increasing agriculture. Stoichiometric theory can be extended to ecosystems, such as streams, to predict the role of consumers in food web and nutrient cycles. Chapters three, four, and five show the importance of mussels in influencing nutrient dynamics and their bottom-up impact on stream food webs. Specifically, chapter 3 shows that mussels influence the nutrients that limit primary productivity and mussels shift the system from N-limitation to co-limitation by N and P. This alleviation of strict N-limitation leads to varied algal assemblages in areas with and without mussels with diatoms dominating in areas with mussels and blue-green algae dominating in areas without mussels. This alteration of nutrient limitation and algal assemblages leads to increased heterogeneity within streams. Chapter 4 demonstrates the importance of mussel-derived nitrogen (MDN) to the food web. By enriching mussels with 15N in the lab and then placing them in a stream, I was able to trace the N leaving mussels and entering the stream food web. Chapter 5 investigated the impact of a drought on mussel communities and ecosystem functions (i.e. nutrient cycling… Advisors/Committee Members: Vaughn, Caryn C. (advisor), Golladay, Stephen W. (committee member), Julian, Jason P. (committee member), Kelly, Jeffery F. (committee member), Patten, Michael A. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: aquatic ecology; stoichiometry; unionid; freshwater mussel; nitrogen; biology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Atkinson, C. L. (2013). Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/7682

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Atkinson, Carla Lee. “Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/7682.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Atkinson, Carla Lee. “Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences.” 2013. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Atkinson CL. Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/7682.

Council of Science Editors:

Atkinson CL. Hierarchical controls on the impact of consumer stoichiometric regulation: From species traits to ecosystem level consequences. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/7682


University of Oklahoma

3. Galbraith, Heather Susan. REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Oklahoma

As humans continue to alter riverine landscapes, we are also likely to impact the evolutionary trajectories of species residing there. Unfortunately, another aspect of mussel biology that is also understudied is the evolution of the great diversity of freshwater mussels, particularly in North America. Several evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed for the evolution of these organisms, yet none have been tested. The goal of my fourth chapter was to address freshwater mussel evolution from the perspective of mechanisms of reproductive isolation, since barriers must exist between species to maintain distinct species identities. I examined the role that habitat use and timing of reproduction may play in isolating co-occurring, closely related mussel species of the genus Quadrula. I found that habitat overlap among closely related species varies (although is often high), but could be one isolating mechanism. Timing of reproduction, however, overlaps almost entirely among these species and is likely not a factor maintaining species identity in this genus. Further research into other isolating mechanisms is required to increase our understanding of reproductive barriers and evolution of freshwater mussels. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaughn, Caryn C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Freshwater mussels – Reproduction; Adaptation (Biology); Conservation biology; Freshwater mussels – Evolution

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Galbraith, H. S. (2009). REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/318704

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Galbraith, Heather Susan. “REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/318704.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Galbraith, Heather Susan. “REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION.” 2009. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Galbraith HS. REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/318704.

Council of Science Editors:

Galbraith HS. REPRODUCTION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: MUSSELS, IMPOUNDMENTS, AND CONSERVATION. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/318704

.