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You searched for +publisher:"University of Oklahoma" +contributor:("Fuenzalida, Eugenia"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Faneros, Michael. A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Oklahoma

Research investigating executive function is difficult in two different ways. First, executive function has only recently evolved into its own field of study, and unlike the fields of personality or intelligence, it therefore does not have a wide body of prior research to draw upon. The second difficulty follows from this limited knowledge base. The many different approaches to the study of executive function have given a diverse set of ways to define and operationalize it, leading to numerous contradictions in the literature. This study addresses these contradictions by examining three different theories and four models related to those theories in an effort to understand how each fits the same data set. Models from Miyake and Friedman’s (2012) and Faneros’s (2011) factorial models, Peterson and Posner’s (2012) biological model, and Barkley’s (2012) clinical model are each described and analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, path analysis was used with each model to assess the model’s stability and strength at predicting performance on a complex executive function task. The results indicate Peterson and Posner’s theory provided a model that proved to have the best fit and was the most parsimonious of all the proposed models, χ2 (10, N = 306) = 7.047, p =.72, CFI = 1.000, SRMR = 0.024, BIC = 4692. Each model’s strengths and weakness were explored, and future directions considered. Advisors/Committee Members: Gilliland, Kirby (advisor), Shehab, Randa (committee member), Cox-Fuenzalida, Eugenia (committee member), Gronlund, Scott (committee member), Song, Hairong (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Personality.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Faneros, M. (2014). A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/10368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Faneros, Michael. “A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/10368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Faneros, Michael. “A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS.” 2014. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Faneros M. A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/10368.

Council of Science Editors:

Faneros M. A COMPARISON OF CONTEMPORARY EXECUTIVE FUNCTION MODELS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/10368


University of Oklahoma

2. Heslen, John. LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Oklahoma

The purpose of this research was to gain a better understanding of how specific aspects of cognitive performance are influenced by operating in lethal environments with the aim of incorporating any helpful insights into the operations performed by human intelligence collectors. Gaining a better understanding of any negative cognitive effects could enable leaders in the intelligence community to take mediating action resulting in a more efficient enterprise. Simulating the cognitive processes expected to be at play in lethal environments was accomplished by utilizing a technique known as mortality salience that has been shown to induce specific psycho-social reactions in individuals. Cognitive performance was tested by using the simple reaction time, attentional switching, and Stroop tests of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM4TM). Memory recall was tested by asking participants to recall categorized items after watching a video of a fictional intelligence source. This study found mortality salience had a statistically-significant influence on certain aspects of executive function as well as memory recall and suggest the etiology of mortality salience effects are most consistent with modern understandings of cognitive bias. As such, the term “mortality bias” is proposed for future investigations and explanations of the phenomenon. Advisors/Committee Members: Gilliland, Kirby (advisor), Damphousse, Kelly (committee member), Gabert, Trent (committee member), Cox-Fuenzalida, Eugenia (committee member), Snyder, Lori (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Anxiety; Mortality Salience; Attention Control Theory; ANAM4; Intelligence Collection

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Heslen, J. (2016). LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/47084

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heslen, John. “LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/47084.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heslen, John. “LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS.” 2016. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Heslen J. LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/47084.

Council of Science Editors:

Heslen J. LEADING A MORE EFFECTIVE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY: UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING THE COGNITIVE CHALLENGES OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION IN LETHAL ENVIRONMENTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/47084


University of Oklahoma

3. Stone, Brandon. PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Oklahoma

Understanding the etiology of psychological and physiological stress resilience is imperative to human performance optimization. Previous studies examining how physiological systems interact with cognitive performance are not only quite limited, but have routinely examined performance immediately following exercise, the present study was designed to simultaneously and systematically examine the relationship between cognitive performance, specifically executive function, and high-intensity exercise in 15 ROTC cadets. Linear mixed modeling and Tukey’s multiple comparison tests were conducted to evaluate significant differences in mean scores at varying levels of exercise intensity. Results indicated that both absolute and relative levels of exercise intensity are highly predictive of changes in both executive function scores and degree of cerebral oxygenation. Specifically, decrements in cognition begin to occur at intensities higher than 70% of HRR. This study is an important first step in identifying key factors and associated mechanisms indicative of positive adaptation to physiological stress (i.e., exercise), enabling the identification of potential targets for training or the modification of protocols to optimize performance in high risk occupations. Advisors/Committee Members: Black, Chris (advisor), Kellawan, Mikhail (advisor), Shehab, Randa (committee member), Fuenzalida, Eugenia (committee member), Larson, Rebecca (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: acute exercise; cognitive performance; stress resilience; human performance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stone, B. (2019). PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/321111

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stone, Brandon. “PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/321111.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stone, Brandon. “PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE.” 2019. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stone B. PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/321111.

Council of Science Editors:

Stone B. PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS RESILIENCE: OPTIMIZING COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN RESERVED OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS DURING EXERCISE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/321111

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