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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Tim Machan, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Ben Reinhard. "God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Medieval Studies, 2014, University of Notre Dame

In the past fifty years or so, it has become common for scholars of Anglo-Saxon England to (first of all) claim that Wulfstan’s Institutes of Polity is of central importance to the Old English canon, and (secondly) to complain that it is strangely neglected by the wider academic community. This dissertation traces the reasons for the neglect and attempts to correct it. Most of the neglect stems from the fact that no suitable modern edition exists; because of this, the first step in the process of remediation is to return to original manuscripts that contain it. This return to the manuscripts provides valuable new information, and allows us to draw several new conclusions about the genesis of the text and the broader social project contained therein. In the first place, we can see the Polity is not a stand-alone text: it is part of a wider project of social renewal. This project was rooted in clerical and liturgical reform, and looked forward to the later eleventh-century clash between regnum and sacerdotium. Even more importantly, the texts in the manuscripts help to connect Wulfstan’s writings with the two most important developments in social theory from the continent: namely, the Three Orders of Society and the Peace of God movement. Comparison with the continental developments allows us to view Polity as yet another sub-Carolingian response to the crises of the early eleventh century. The dissertation opens up three prospects for future research. The connections with continental political thought should be pursued in order to gain a fuller understanding of the interdependency of English and continental thought. Moreover, the dissertation reveals the need for a new edition of Polity: this should be completed as soon as possible. Finally, once Polity is revealed as a coherent and unified text, specialized studies can be made to analyze it as a literary text — rather than simply as a historical curiosity. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas Noble, Committee Member, Christopher Abram, Committee Chair, Tim Machan, Committee Member, Jonathan Wilcox, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Wulfstan; manuscripts; Institutes of Polity; Old English

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APA (6th Edition):

Reinhard, B. (2014). "God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/s1784j05s8z

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reinhard, Ben. “"God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 16, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/s1784j05s8z.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reinhard, Ben. “"God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>.” 2014. Web. 16 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Reinhard B. "God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 16]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/s1784j05s8z.

Council of Science Editors:

Reinhard B. "God's Lore and Worldly Law": Archbishop Wulfstan, his manuscripts, and the Institutes of Polity</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/s1784j05s8z


University of Notre Dame

2. Timothy S. Miller. Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>.

Degree: PhD, English, 2014, University of Notre Dame

This dissertation analyzes Chaucer’s narrative endings as the recurrent key battlegrounds in the poet’s long reception history, whether in the early English manuscript tradition, in the imitative Chaucerian writing of sixteenth-century Scotland, or in modernity’s institutional scholarship and continuing tradition of creative response to the poet’s works. Combining narratological and historicist perspectives, it first situates Chaucer’s endings within what we can reconstruct of medieval narrative theory, and then examines how and why so many later authors rewrite or otherwise intervene in Chaucer’s endings, always interrogating the ideological stakes of the literary ending and its place in interpretation. The project contributes to the ongoing recovery of a medieval literary theory by identifying narratological conceptions of the function and purpose of ending in the ars poetica tradition, particularly as expressed by disciples of Horace such as Geoffrey of Vinsauf, Matthew of Vendôme, and John of Garland. Rhetorical handbooks emphasize formal closural devices like prayers, blessings, curses, proverbs, morals, and so on, the same formulas that signal the ends of the majority of Chaucer’s narratives but that have received little attention in themselves. I argue that these endings demonstrate Chaucer’s adherence to a Horatian rather than Aristotelian paradigm of ending, which privileges the harmonious congruence of parts over teleology and necessity. By contrast, the reception history of Chaucer’s endings witnesses a resurgence of neo-Aristotelian reading strategies that center the ending as the culmination and fulfillment of a work. The reception history of Chaucer’s Retraction provides the clearest example of the way in which often unarticulated theories of ending have driven response to Chaucer’s works. By studying the diversity of methods by which Chaucer’s first scribes rubricate and represent the Retraction, we can find evidence for an early understanding of Chaucer’s most controversial ending in Horatian terms, as for example in the probable allusion to John of Garland’s concept of authorial license present in London, British Library MS Lansdowne 851. As the Retraction enters, exits, and reenters the print tradition, readers employ different theories of ending to render the document more or less central to Chaucer’s works, or even to decenter or delegitimate it entirely: Chaucer’s endings must always be contextualized within theories of ending both medieval and modern. By attending to the complexity of both medieval literary theory and medieval narrative itself, overall this project builds a case for a more historically responsible narratology of medieval texts, as well as a more expansive one that would consider the implications of the reception history of these texts and the multiple forms that they take. For instance, the intricate structure of the narrative discourse in Chaucer’s dream visions becomes further complicated by the existence of multiple versions of these texts in the mouvance or… Advisors/Committee Members: Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Committee Chair, Tim Machan, Committee Member, Jesse Lander, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Chaucer; reception history; narrative theory; endings

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APA (6th Edition):

Miller, T. S. (2014). Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/gf06g160j4m

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Timothy S.. “Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 16, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/gf06g160j4m.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Timothy S.. “Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>.” 2014. Web. 16 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Miller TS. Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 16]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/gf06g160j4m.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller TS. Closing the Book on Chaucer: Medieval Theories of Ending and the Ends of Chaucerian Narrative</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/gf06g160j4m


University of Notre Dame

3. Marjorie Harrington. Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>.

Degree: PhD, English, 2017, University of Notre Dame

Medieval languages existed in a state of constant contact and interaction with other languages. In this project, I argue that thirteenth- and fourteenth- century English trilingual manuscripts show the coalescing of distinctive approaches to the literary and pragmatic possibilities of multilingual clusters of texts. In particular, the construction of parallel-text translations becomes a catalyst for the generation of Early Middle English poetry. Through examination of three manuscripts linked to the vibrant West Midlands literary ecosystem (Cambridge, Trinity College MS B.14.39; William Herebert’s preaching notebook, British Library MS Additional 46919; and British Library MS Harley 913, the “Kildare manuscript”), I demonstrate how the production of paired translations fueled the development of English religious verse. Interpreting medieval texts’ manuscript contexts is essential to understanding their meaning. This is especially true of paired translations, where the capacity of each language to reflect and comment on the other(s) is embedded in their material form. Whether a translation is inserted between the lines of its source text, interwoven with it in alternating stanzas, or copied in an adjacent column, these visual frameworks place the parallel texts and the registers associated with each of the languages in conversation with themselves. The majority of medieval English paired translations have religious topics and were likely used for public and private devotional practices, including religious instruction, preaching, sung performance, and meditation. Paired translations for instruction, preaching, and performance have listeners as the final intended audience and depend on intermediary readers to transmit the text. In contrast, translations for private meditation were primarily visual and non-performative. To a person meditating on these paired translations, juxtaposed or intertwined texts would promote nonlinear reading practices, drawing the reader to consider the different aspects of the subject matter revealed in each language. For readers directly engaged with the manuscripts (a group of readers that would include their scribes), however, translations for instruction, preaching, and performance could also become the objects of meditation and nonlinear reading. By constructing paired translations, medieval poets highlight the act of translation, underscoring how translation is simultaneously effective as a means for communication and as a tool for self-reflection. Advisors/Committee Members: Tim Machan, Committee Member, Susannah Monta, Committee Member, Susanna Fein, Committee Member, Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Research Director.

Subjects/Keywords: multilingualism; medieval poetry; translation; Medieval literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harrington, M. (2017). Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq00t7s

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harrington, Marjorie. “Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 16, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq00t7s.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harrington, Marjorie. “Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>.” 2017. Web. 16 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Harrington M. Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 16]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq00t7s.

Council of Science Editors:

Harrington M. Bilingual Form: Paired Translations of Latin and Vernacular Poetry, c. 1250-1350</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2017. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq00t7s

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