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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Paul W. Bohn, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Jingying Zhang. Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>.

Degree: Chemical Engineering, 2012, University of Notre Dame

Metal nanowires draw large attention due to their wide application, such as in electronic and sensor devices. In this study, we explored the electrical and chemical-sensing behaviors of gold nanowires fabricated by Focused Ion Beam etching (FIB) and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The chemical sensor is composed of a single nanowire connected to two gold contact pads. The resistivity of nanowires fabricated by EBL shows a size effect that thinner nanowires have higher resistivity. Nanowires fabricated by FIB etching show greatly reduced sensitivity toward molecular adsorption compared to those fabricated by EBL, though nanowires fabricated by FIB etching exhibit very high resistivity. Gold nanowires fabricated by EBL show different chemical sensing behavior upon exposure to thiols and amines. Thiols cause positive resistivity change, while amines cause negative resistivity change. Thinner nanowire fabricated by EBL showed higher sensitivity. Advisors/Committee Members: Hsueh-chia Chang, Committee Member, Gregory V Hartland, Committee Member, Paul W Bohn, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: FIB; EBL; gold nanowires

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, J. (2012). Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/9c67wm1383f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Jingying. “Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>.” 2012. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/9c67wm1383f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Jingying. “Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>.” 2012. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhang J. Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9c67wm1383f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang J. Electrical Transport and Chemical Sensing Properties of Gold Nanowires</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2012. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9c67wm1383f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

2. Valerie Goss. Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2012, University of Notre Dame

A single computer chip has more components than there are people in the world. Available space on the silicon chip is reaching the limit for adding new features. Scientists and engineers continue to look towards understanding single molecules, nanostructures, thin films, and microstructures as components with which to build smaller, more robust circuits. In this regard, DNA origami has taken shape as a promising star. The nanostructure, made entirely from polynucleotides, forms by self-assembly, yields billions of copies in a small drop, and can be functionalized, all in a one pot synthesis. The placement of new and smaller features on a silicon chip is possible with directed DNA origami binding onto silicon surfaces. Lithographically patterned anchor pads[1] and complimentary shapes[2] have been shown to direct the placement of individual origami on modified silicon surfaces. However, binding errors and non-uniform orientation still occur. Therefore, it is important to understand and to develop methods to control DNA origami binding. I will present the first set of results on the characteristics of DNA origami adsorption to and desorption from silicon and mica substrates, which speaks to the stability of these structures on surfaces, and their ability to anneal during deposition. I will also compare the maximum surface coverage of DNA origami with predictions based on a random sequential adsorption model. In addition, I worked on burn-in doping of phosphorus and electrical manipulation of DNA origami, and I will present this data. Finally, I include a time capsule which places the reader in 1896 Chicago, and gives insight on the University of Chicago’s progressive influence on science and STEM education in Chicago and the city of Chicago’s political support at that time. Borrowing from those changes in attitudes about science education, I propose that nanotechnology curriculum development could help turn around low achievement scores in science and math among African American students in the city. I discuss an engaging tactile activity modeled after the Atomic Force Microscope that I developed as a University of Notre Dame-NSF GK-12 Graduate Fellow. Details of how to make and use this teaching tool are provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Marya Lieberman, Committee Chair, S. Alex Kandel, Committee Member, Paul W. Bohn, Committee Member, Dianne Pinderhughes, Committee Member, Holly V. Goodson, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: DNA origami; APTES; SAMs; silicon

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goss, V. (2012). Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx93b22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goss, Valerie. “Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>.” 2012. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx93b22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goss, Valerie. “Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>.” 2012. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Goss V. Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx93b22.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Goss V. Adsorbing, Desorbing, Jamming, and Burning DNA Origami</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2012. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx93b22

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

3. Anne E. Mattingly. Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>.

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, 2018, University of Notre Dame

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a prevalent, Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen that employs several different methods of motility to colonize surfaces, including swarming. Swarming is defined as a flagella-mediated community movement of cells through a thin liquid on a surface and is highly variable depending on environmental conditions and available nutrients. P. aeruginosa is capable of modifying its environment by producing rhamnolipid, a surfactant that lowers the surface tension of the thin liquid layer. Provided with glutamate as the sole carbon source rather than glucose, P. aeruginosa can swarm in a rhamnolipid-independent manner, but the extent of this motility depends upon composition of the environment, including surface moisture and nutrients. Noble agar and the agar substitute Gelzan were evaluated for this rhamnolipid-independent swarming (RIS) phenotype and a consistent protocol for investigating RIS was developed. The RIS phenotype was observed under a variety of environmental and nutritional combinations to determine a causative action. In this work, I show that a ΔrhlAB mutant can swarm when growing on compounds associated with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. I also assert that this rhamnolipid-independent swarming phenotype is not a surfactant-mediated motility. Additionally, it is not related to any other obvious biochemical agent potentially used to promote swarm motility. Two regulatory genes identified to be involved in swarming, dipA and PA1728, were found not to specifically regulate this rhamnolipid-independent swarm behavior. A proteome analysis comparing ΔrhlAB swarming cells with wt did not suggest a clear regulator element that controls rhamnolipid-independent swarming, however, these results do provide some targeted direction for further study. The phosphodiesterase DipA was identified as potentially involved in RIS, but was found to affect swarming motility through its role in regulation of cyclic-di-GMP. I show that doubling the nutrient composition of rich media (e.g. tryptone) leads to a significant increase in swarming and swimming, while doubling glucose or glutamate in minimal medium does not uniformly increase motility. Correspondingly, I have found that DipA is necessary to regulate intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in a nutritionally dependent-manner and swarming can occur when c-di-GMP levels are elevated on some nutrient media. Advisors/Committee Members: Joshua D. Shrout, Research Director, Shaun W. Lee, Committee Member, Na Wei, Committee Member, Paul W. Bohn, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: cyclic-di-GMP; motility assay; rhamnolipid independent motility; swarming motility; rhamnolipid; Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mattingly, A. E. (2018). Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/47429883h3z

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mattingly, Anne E.. “Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>.” 2018. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/47429883h3z.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mattingly, Anne E.. “Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>.” 2018. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Mattingly AE. Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/47429883h3z.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mattingly AE. Environmental Impacts on Regulation of Swarming Motility in <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa<b></b></i></h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2018. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/47429883h3z

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.