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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Paolo Minero, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Rahul Singh. On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>.

Degree: MSin Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, 2011, University of Notre Dame

This thesis deals with two control-communication problems. The rst problem deals with control of a system over a constrained channel, while the other problem deals with using control techniques to analyze channels with state. The rst problem considers an LQR control when the sensor, controller, and actuator all have their own clocks that may drift apart from each other. An ane clock and a quadratic clock model are considered. For aquadratic cost function, an analysis of the loss of performance incurred as a function of how asynchronous the clocks are is performed. This also allows us to obtain guidelines on how often to utilize the communication resources to synchronize the clocks. The second problem dealt in this thesis concerns capacity of an AWGN channel corrupted by i.i.d. erasures.Transmitter and receiver do not know about the occurrence of erasures. A novel control oriented feedback coding scheme is presented and capacity of this channel is analyzed. It is also shown that Schalkwijk-Kailath Coding Scheme and its variants fail to achieve any rate above (1-e)½ log(1+P), where e is the deletion probability of the deletion-corrupted channel. Advisors/Committee Members: Panos Antsaklis, Committee Member, Paolo Minero, Committee Member, Vijay Gupta, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: Control-Communication Problems

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, R. (2011). On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx9398t

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Rahul. “On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed May 24, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx9398t.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Rahul. “On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>.” 2011. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Singh R. On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx9398t.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh R. On LQR Control with Asynchronous Clocks and Control Oriented Code for AWGN Erasure Channel: Two Control-Communication Problems</h1>. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/hd76rx9398t


University of Notre Dame

2. Zhenhua Gong. Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Electrical Engineering, 2013, University of Notre Dame

This dissertation characterizes the geometry of mobile wireless networks and their performance. In mobile networks, distance variations caused by node mobility generate fluctuations of the channel gains. Such fluctuations can be treated as another type of fading besides multi-path effects. Interference statistics in mobile random networks are characterized by incorporating the distance variations of mobile nodes to the channel gain fluctuations. The mean interference is calculated at the center and at the border of a finite mobile network. The network performance is evaluated in terms of the outage probability. Compared to a static network, the interference in a single snapshot does not change under uniform mobility models. However, random waypoint mobility increases (decreases) the interference at the center (at the border). Due to the correlation of node locations (in mobile or static networks), the interference and outage are temporally and spatially correlated. We quantify the temporal correlation of the interference and outage in mobile Poisson networks in terms of the correlation coefficient of the interference and conditional outage probability, respectively. The results show that it is essential that routing, MAC scheduling, and retransmission schemes need to be smart (i.e., correlation-aware) to avoid bursts of transmission failures. For communication between two neighboring nodes in wireless networks, the local delay, which is defined as the time it takes a node to successfully transmit a packet, is an important quantity. Previous research focuses on the local delay in static or infinitely mobile Poisson networks with ALOHA. In this dissertation, we extend the local delay results to Poisson networks with finite mobility. Bounds of the local delay in mobile Poisson networks are derived for different mobility and transmission models. Although mobility helps reduce the local delay, its impact depends on the particular mobility model. The phase transition that marks the jump of the local delay from finite to infinite is also characterized. Advisors/Committee Members: Paolo Minero, Committee Member, Nicholas Laneman, Committee Member, Thomas Fuja, Committee Member, Martin Haenggi, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: wireless; interference; mobility

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gong, Z. (2013). Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/k3569309196

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gong, Zhenhua. “Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed May 24, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/k3569309196.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gong, Zhenhua. “Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>.” 2013. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Gong Z. Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/k3569309196.

Council of Science Editors:

Gong Z. Interference, Outage, and Throughput in Mobile Wireless Networks</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/k3569309196


University of Notre Dame

3. Sunil Srinivasa. Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Electrical Engineering, 2011, University of Notre Dame

This thesis focuses on the modeling and analysis of wireless multihop networks, employing a combination of ideas from a well-known tool in stochastic geometry, namely the Poisson shot noise theory and an unfamiliar concept in statistical mechanics, namely the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). We begin our study by considering the simplest wireless multihop network topology - the line network, where the source, destination and all the relays are located in a collinear fashion. First, we propose a simple buffering and transmission scheme for wireless line networks which not only guarantees packet delivery but also helps keep packet delays small whilst regulating the flow of packets in a completely decentralized fashion. Second, we characterize the end-to-end delay distribution and achievable throughput of the wireless multihop line network for two different channel access schemes, randomized-TDMA and ALOHA. Additionally, we use our results to provide some useful design insights in long line networks. Next, we consider a more intricate network topology comprising an infinite number of source-destination flows and analyze design-level issues such as determining the optimum density of transmitters or the optimal number of hops along a flow that maximizes the throughput performance of the network. We also consider several other complex topologies comprising intersecting flows and propose the partial mean-field approximation (PMFA), an elegant technique that helps tightly approximate the throughput (and end-to-end delay) of such systems. We then demonstrate via a simple toy example that the PMFA procedure is quite general in that it may be used to accurately evaluate the performance of multihop networks with arbitrary topologies. Finally, we identify that when reliable delivery of packets is not very critical, a viable solution towards balancing end-to-end delay and reliability in multihop networks is to have the nodes forcibly drop a small fraction of packets. Based on this principle, we present an analytical framework that helps quantify the throughput-delay-reliability performances of the ALOHA multihop network. We find that while in the noise-limited regime, dropping a small fraction of packets in the network leads to a smaller end-to-end delay at the cost of reduced throughput, in the interference-limited scenario, dropping a few packets in the network can sometimes help mitigate the interference in the network leading to an increased throughput. We intend to promote TASEPs as a powerful tool to analyze the performance of multihop networks and hope that this introductory work instigates interest in solving other relevant wireless networking problems employing ideas from statistical mechanics. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Martin Haenggi, Committee Chair, Dr. Thomas E Fuja, Committee Member, Dr. Ken Sauer, Committee Member, Dr. Paolo Minero, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: interference; multihop wireless networks; MAC schemes; wireless network topology; end-to-end delay; throughput

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Srinivasa, S. (2011). Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348c28

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Srinivasa, Sunil. “Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed May 24, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348c28.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Srinivasa, Sunil. “Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>.” 2011. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Srinivasa S. Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348c28.

Council of Science Editors:

Srinivasa S. Statistical Mechanics for Wireless Systems: Application of Exclusion Processes to the Modeling and Analysis of Multihop Networks</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348c28

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