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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Michael C. Desch, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Paul C. Avey. Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>.

Degree: Political Science, 2013, University of Notre Dame

Why do states with few or no nuclear weapons challenge and resist opponents with superior nuclear capabilities? International relations theory and common sense suggest that these instances should be rare. However, conflict in these asymmetric nuclear balances, what I call nuclear primacy, occurs very frequently. I argue that such conflict occurs because nuclear primacy creates the opportunity for the inferior side to use limited force to redress political grievances. The argument is therefore a story of motive and opportunity. On the motive side, states are most likely to challenge or resist rivals with superior nuclear forces when they believe there is a threat to their core interests. On the opportunity side, nuclear primacy permits conflict because the low threat to the strong side’s nuclear arsenal reduces the dangers for deliberate and accidental nuclear use. The dangers of pressing too hard and inviting nuclear retaliation will tend to constrain the amount of force that the weak side will utilize. As such, though conflict will occur quite frequently in nuclear primacy, it will tend to remain limited. The inferior side is most likely to press the issue to war when it has outside support that can constrain the nuclear superior side or it is directly attacked. I test the argument by examining conflict in nuclear primacy from 1945-2000. Specifically, I examined data on all states’ nuclear arsenals from 1945-2000 and found that nuclear primacy permits frequent, low-level conflict. I next examined a series of historical case studies in nuclear primacy. These included periods of conflict and no conflict as well as confrontations that did and did not escalate to war. Consistent with my argument, conflict was most likely to occur when the nuclear inferior side faced a challenge to its core interests. During the confrontations the inferior side proceeded in a cautious manner, testing and probing the strong side’s reaction to attain a favorable political settlement. Advisors/Committee Members: Sebastian Rosato, Committee Member, Dan Lindley, Committee Member, Keir A. Lieber, Committee Member, Michael C. Desch, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: nuclear politics; deterrence; strategy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Avey, P. C. (2013). Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/2514nk33x6v

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Avey, Paul C.. “Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>.” 2013. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 05, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/2514nk33x6v.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Avey, Paul C.. “Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>.” 2013. Web. 05 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Avey PC. Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 05]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2514nk33x6v.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Avey PC. Tempting Fate: Interests, Escalation, and Conflict in Nuclear Primacy</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2514nk33x6v

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

2. Richard William Maass. To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>.

Degree: Political Science, 2013, University of Notre Dame

Why do states sometimes decline profitable opportunities to annex their neighbors? My dissertation answers this question by examining the domestic political effects of international territorial annexation. In short, I argue that state leaders consider domestic political consequences in addition to material benefits and military costs when determining the desirability of annexationism, and reject opportunities to annex territory where they fear it impairing their domestic influence (even where annexation would be materially profitable). I argue that such fears lead democracies, which are particularly vulnerable to swings in the domestic balance of power resulting from annexation, to reject the absorption of neighboring societies. I suggest that the current stability of the international system is a result of this mechanism, rooted in the spread of democracy among the great powers. Testing this theory has involved two types of research. First, I constructed an original dataset of 288 annexationist ventures conducted by the modern great powers throughout their histories as powerful states. Using this dataset, I conclusively established both the decline of annexationism after World War II and the lack of annexationism by democracies. After laying out my theory of annexation?s domestic political consequences, I test its causal logic against the conventional wisdom by process-tracing the decision making of US leaders facing major opportunities to expand into Canada and Mexico between 1774 and 1871. The unique geopolitical features of the United States should have made it particularly desirous of conquering its neighbors, yet these case studies clearly demonstrate that US leaders desired the lands of their neighbors but not their populations because they feared the domestic political consequences of assimilating them. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Dan Lindley, Committee Member, Dr. Sebastian Rosato, Committee Member, Dr. Michael C. Desch, Committee Chair, Dr. Walter Nugent, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: conquest; annexationism; united states; international relations; democracy; foreign policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maass, R. W. (2013). To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq0038m

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maass, Richard William. “To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>.” 2013. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 05, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq0038m.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maass, Richard William. “To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>.” 2013. Web. 05 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Maass RW. To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 05]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq0038m.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Maass RW. To Conquer Land or People: Democracy and the Domestic Political Costs of Annexationism</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/2z10wq0038m

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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