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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Masaru Kuno, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Felix Vietmeyer. Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2014, University of Notre Dame

CdSe nanowires are one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures with unique properties. The wires studied in this work possess diameters on the nanometer scale while diameters are on the order of tens of microns. For CdSe structures this has the consequence that size quantization effects are at play along the radial dimension while longitudinal dimensions are outside the confinement regime. Physical and electrical properties are therefore expected to be diameter dependent, but not very sensitive to variations in length. Another important aspect to consider is that the diameters studied span a range from small (i.e. d~3-5 nm) where wires show discrete transitions akin to quantum dots all the way up to large (i.e. d~25 nm). At the largest size studied, the material does not show size quantization effects and its properties are similar to bulk CdSe. One of the key questions I would like to answer is what characterizes the transition from a regime controlled by quantum effects (i.e. small diameter nanowires) to bulk-like semiconductors (i.e. large diameter wires). The tools used to carry out the characterization include a number of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques that are used to probe semiconductor nanowires both on the ensemble and single nanowire level. For single wire level measurements, the tool of choice is optical microscopy. Using microscopy, individual nanowires can be identified and studied using various excitation and emission wavelengths to characterize their properties. Using emission and absorption spectroscopies, the electronic structure of the nanowire as well as how charges interact is revealed. It, in turn, allows identifying signatures that belong to photogenerated charges that exist as coulombically bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) and distinguish them from free charges. Advisors/Committee Members: Dan Meisel, Committee Member, Gregory Hartland, Committee Member, Prashant Kamat, Committee Member, Masaru Kuno, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: optical spectroscopy; quantum confinement; nanomaterial; Nanowire; absorption; semiconductor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vietmeyer, F. (2014). Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/rf55z606446

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vietmeyer, Felix. “Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>.” 2014. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 04, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/rf55z606446.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vietmeyer, Felix. “Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>.” 2014. Web. 04 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Vietmeyer F. Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 04]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/rf55z606446.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vietmeyer F. Optical Properties of CdSe Nanowires — Experiment and Theory</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/rf55z606446

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

2. Hangyao Wang. Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>.

Degree: Chemical Engineering, 2009, University of Notre Dame

Base metal oxides have long been of interest as catalysts for oxidation of small molecules such as CO and NO. As an example, Ru metal becomes active for catalytic oxidation only after partial surface oxidation. The (110) surface of RuO2 is a convenient model for the oxidized metal surface because it is active for CO oxidation and well characterized. In this study we employ plane-wave, supercell DFT calculations to examine the mechanisms of oxygen activation, COO oxidation as well as surface poisoning on RuO2(110) surface. We first consider O2 adsorption and dissociation, and show that the molecular O2 species observed in TPD experiments and identified as a precursor to O2 dissociation is in fact a spectator present only at high coverages of surface O. We then study the CO and NO oxidation mechanisms on the RuO2(110) surface and compare the fundamental differences that lead to complete different catalytic reactivity of this surface on CO and NO oxidations. Practical applications of oxidation catalysts are limited by surface poisoning, so it is important to understand and ultimately to learn to bypass surface poisoning. We investigate catalytic CO oxidation and its competition with surface poisoning by employing first-principles thermodynamics as well as micro-kinetic modeling method. We identify both carbonate and bicarbonate surface poisons and show that the coverage of the latter is highly sensitive to water concentration and likely accounts for the surface poisoning observed experimentally. As an attempt to understand how surface metal oxides develop on metal surfaces and what their exact role is during oxidation, we study the formation of oxide nuclei on Pt surface. We hypothesize that the roughening on Pt surfaces observed in STM experiments initiates from small surface PtxOy clusters. We quantify the stability of these clusters vs. the cluster size and oxygen chemical potential and explore whether these clusters might account for the anomalously high catalytic activity of Pt and other metals at high oxygen pressure. Advisors/Committee Members: S. Alex Kandel, Committee Member, Masaru Kuno, Committee Chair, William F. Schneider, Committee Member, Edward Maginn, Committee Member, Paul McGinn, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: oxygen activation; first principles simulation; ruthenium dioxide; surface poisoning; transition state theory; micro-kinetic modeling; activation energy; catalyst deactivation; reaction mechanism; heterogeneous catalysis; reaction energy; NO oxidation; phase diagram; CO oxidation; density functional theory; catalytic oxidation; adsorption

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, H. (2009). Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/j9601z42v4d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Hangyao. “Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>.” 2009. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 04, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/j9601z42v4d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Hangyao. “Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>.” 2009. Web. 04 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Wang H. Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 04]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/j9601z42v4d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wang H. Atomistic Studies of Oxidation Catalysis and Surface Poisoning on Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/j9601z42v4d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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