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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("M. Ken Kuno, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Rachel Nduku Masyuko. Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2014, University of Notre Dame

Correlated chemical imaging is an emerging strategy for acquisition of images by combining information from multiplexed measurement platforms to track, visualize, and interpret in situ changes in the structure, organization, and activities of interesting chemical systems, frequently spanning multiple decades in space and time. Acquiring and correlating information from complementary imaging experiments has the potential to expose complex chemical behavior in ways that are simply not available from single methods applied in isolation, thereby greatly amplifying the information gathering power of imaging experiments. However, in order to correlate image information across platforms, a number of issues must be addressed. First, signals are obtained from disparate experiments with fundamentally different figures of merit, including pixel size, spatial resolution, dynamic range and acquisition rates. In addition, images are often acquired on different instruments in different locations, so the sample must be registered spatially so that the same area of the sample landscape is addressed. The signals acquired must be correlated in both spatial and temporal domains, and the resulting information has to be presented in a way that is readily understood. These requirements pose special challenges for image cross-correlation that go well beyond those posed in single technique imaging approaches. The work described in this thesis focuses on employing molecular imaging to study complex samples, in particular biological samples that exhibit great complexities in their chemical species and often tend to be dynamic, thus making it difficult to perform imaging and chemical analysis using one technique. The work demonstrates the utility of combining complementary experiments to perform chemical imaging. Specifically, a correlated imaging platform combining mass spectrometry techniques is developed to overcome technical limitations in each method and to amplify the information gathering power in the experiments. The work describes the designing and implementation of the imaging platform and shows its utility in studying bacterial biofilms. Advisors/Committee Members: Gregory Hartland, Committee Member, Paul Bohn, Committee Chair, M. Ken Kuno, Committee Member, Joshua Shrout, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Bacteria; Biofilms; Imaging; correlated imaging; Mass-spectrometric imaging; Confocal Raman microscopy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Masyuko, R. N. (2014). Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/mg74qj7506x

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Masyuko, Rachel Nduku. “Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>.” 2014. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/mg74qj7506x.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Masyuko, Rachel Nduku. “Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>.” 2014. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Masyuko RN. Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/mg74qj7506x.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Masyuko RN. Correlated Imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry for Studying Microbial and Plant Systems: Going Beyond Single Technique Limitations</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/mg74qj7506x

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

2. Matthew McIntyre Jobbins. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2013, University of Notre Dame

Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to investigate the dynamics of gas/surface reactions as they take place on the molecular scale. Experiments between atomic hydrogen and an Au(111) surface functionalized with a 1-adamantanethiolate self-assembled monolayer resulted in signicant evidence that the reconstruction of the gold during monolayer formation is dependent on the thiolate molecule density on the surface. Reactions have also been completed between atomic chlorine and 1-octanethiolate monolayers, we believe, based on a number of methodologies used to quantify the products, that atomic chlorine is more than five times more likely to react in bulk ordered ares of the monolayer than at defect sites. Further, we have determined that, while chlorination and sulfur abstraction does occur over extended dose times, the principle reaction pathway is likely hydrogen abstraction followed by the recombination of surface radicals, leading to an extensively cross-linked surface. Increasing the throughput of instrumentation already present in the lab has been a major goal. A high-voltage supply capable of supplying 280 V to the tunnel junction has been constructed to make in vacuum tip changes possible. An electrochemical tip etcher has been built and used to prepare sharp SPM tips with a reproducible etched length to apex diameter aspect ratio, and a novel thermoelectrically cooled STM was constructed that will go on to allow the lab to complete thermally activated reaction studies in a controlled environment. Further, We have designed and developed a new ultra-high vacuum, cryogenically cooled STM capable of reevaluating the reactions between H atoms and thiolate SAMs previously completed in the lab, but now, at low-temperature. This will hopefully allow us to further elucidate the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place at surfaces on the molecular level. Advisors/Committee Members: Prof. Franklin (Feng) Tao, Committee Member, Prof. Gregory V. Hartland, Committee Member, Prof. S. Alex Kandel, Committee Chair, Prof. M. Ken Kuno, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Thermal Gas Cracking; Scanning Tunneling Microscopy; Instrument Design; Gas/Surface Reactions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jobbins, M. M. (2013). Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/8k71ng4727d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jobbins, Matthew McIntyre. “Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>.” 2013. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/8k71ng4727d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jobbins, Matthew McIntyre. “Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>.” 2013. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Jobbins MM. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/8k71ng4727d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jobbins MM. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations of reactions between thiolate coated gold surfaces and gas-phase radicals.</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/8k71ng4727d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

3. Song Guo. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2008, University of Notre Dame

Devices built from quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) use cells with bistable charge configurations to represent binary information. Coulomb interactions between cells allow the state of one cell to affect that of another, and can be used to construct more advanced QCA devices, such as binary wires, inverters, and logic gates. Molecular QCA cells, with their sizes at the nanometer scale, are predicted to be able to function at room temperature. A dinuclear organometallic molecule, trans-<a href="b%3ERu2%3C/b">Cl(dppe)2Ru(CÌÄå¢Ì¢åÛå¡ÌâåÁC)6Ru(dppe)2Cl</a>, is a candidate for use in molecular QCA devices when it is singly oxidized to the mixed-valence Ru2+[PF6]-. These molecules were studied by ultra-high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) at room and low temperatures. Ru2 was pulse deposited onto the Au(111) surface under vacuum. Isolated Ru2 molecules were successfully imaged by STM on Au(111) at room temperature. However, STM images were degraded by mobile toluene solvent molecules that remain on the surface after the deposition. Cooling the sample to 77 K allows solvent molecules to be observed directly using STM, and under these conditions, toluene forms organized striped domains. Although pulse deposition is an effective way to deposit molecules on surfaces, the presence of solvent on the surface after pulse deposition is unavoidable without thermal annealing, and this annealing causes undesired chemical changes in the adsorbates under study. Submolecular structure of Ru2 was clearly discernible in STM images at room temperature, with a bright feature corresponding to each of the two Ru-centered end groups within each Ru2 molecule. The adsorption of Ru2 was found to have some degree of orientation preference on Au(111) at room temperature. Rotation and translation of Ru2 molecules were induced by the STM tip under some tunneling conditions. At 77 K, Ru2 and Ru2+[PF6]- both form close-packed islands with organized striped patterns on Au(111). For neutral Ru2, all end groups show uniform contrast and the two end groups within each Ru2 molecule are almost indistinguishable. The two end groups of each Ru2+[PF6]- molecule, show clearly discernible contrast differences in STM images. We believe the contrast difference results from the different valence state of the Ru metal atoms in the end groups: one of them is Ru(III), while the other is Ru(II). Near each Ru(III)-centered end group, a small feature was found in STM images and assigned as the counterion [PF6]-. Increasing the sample bias from -1.0 V to 1.0 V attenuates the STM contrast of the charged end groups of Ru2+. This contrast changes result from the different molecular orbitals responsible for the tunneling current under various tip-sample bias voltages. Similar striped monolayers of Ru2+[PF6]- on Au(111) are also observed at… Advisors/Committee Members: S. Alex Kandel, Committee Member, M. Ken Kuno, Committee Member, J. Daniel Gezelter, Committee Member, Dennis C. Jacobs, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: pulse deposition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Guo, S. (2008). Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/f7623b6167d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Guo, Song. “Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>.” 2008. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed July 02, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/f7623b6167d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Guo, Song. “Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>.” 2008. Web. 02 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Guo S. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2008. [cited 2020 Jul 02]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/f7623b6167d.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Guo S. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Dinuclear Organometallic Molecules on Au(111)</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2008. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/f7623b6167d

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.