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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Laura Carlson, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 12 of 12 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Susan M Gundersen. How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, University of Notre Dame

  This dissertation outlines two experiments aimed at investigating how adults learn words in a second language (L2) that do not have one exact equivalent… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: semantic overlap; word frequency; second language acquisition; word learning; lexical semantics

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APA (6th Edition):

Gundersen, S. M. (2013). How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12178n

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gundersen, Susan M. “How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12178n.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gundersen, Susan M. “How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?.” 2013. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Gundersen SM. How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12178n.

Council of Science Editors:

Gundersen SM. How Do Word Meanings in One’s First Language Influence Learning of Similar Words in a Second Language?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12178n


University of Notre Dame

2. Susan Gundersen. Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2011, University of Notre Dame

  This thesis investigates adult native English speakers’ acquisition of Italian (L2) grammar via enrollment in college courses. Predictions are derived from the Competition Model… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: second language learning; competition model; transfer; grammatical cues; syntax

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APA (6th Edition):

Gundersen, S. (2011). Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724s9m

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gundersen, Susan. “Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724s9m.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gundersen, Susan. “Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language.” 2011. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Gundersen S. Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724s9m.

Council of Science Editors:

Gundersen S. Second Language Learners’ Use of Grammatical Cues in Their Second Language. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724s9m


University of Notre Dame

3. Lori Anne Petersen. The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2010, University of Notre Dame

  Concrete objects are used to help children understand mathematical concepts. Research suggests that perceptually rich objects may hinder children’s performance on mathematics tasks relative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: symbols; representation; manipulatives; mathematics

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APA (6th Edition):

Petersen, L. A. (2010). The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/6t053f4807b

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Petersen, Lori Anne. “The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/6t053f4807b.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Petersen, Lori Anne. “The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge.” 2010. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Petersen LA. The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2010. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6t053f4807b.

Council of Science Editors:

Petersen LA. The Effect of Concrete Objects on Counting Skill: An Interaction Between Perceptual Features and Established Knowledge. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2010. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6t053f4807b


University of Notre Dame

4. Lori Anne Petersen. How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, University of Notre Dame

  When counting, the final word used to tag the final item in a set represents the cardinality, or total number, of the set. Understanding… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: counting; representational status; cardinality; early mathematical skills

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APA (6th Edition):

Petersen, L. A. (2013). How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/9w032229p4t

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Petersen, Lori Anne. “How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/9w032229p4t.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Petersen, Lori Anne. “How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality.” 2013. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Petersen LA. How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9w032229p4t.

Council of Science Editors:

Petersen LA. How does the representational status of to-be-counted objects affect children’s understanding of cardinality. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9w032229p4t


University of Notre Dame

5. Patrick L. Hill. How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2009, University of Notre Dame

  The current studies examined whether actor prototypes can motivate one to act in a moral fashion. Studies 1 and 2 examined whether people form… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: volunteerism; prototype theory; moral psychology; social cognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Hill, P. L. (2009). How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/js956d5974h

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hill, Patrick L.. “How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/js956d5974h.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hill, Patrick L.. “How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action.” 2009. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Hill PL. How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/js956d5974h.

Council of Science Editors:

Hill PL. How to Succeed in Morality without Really Trying: Testing the Influence of Implicit Prototypes on Moral Action. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/js956d5974h


University of Notre Dame

6. Adam Thomas Biggs. How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, University of Notre Dame

  To successfully guide attention toward a relevant object, the observer must have information about the defining (or essential) features of that object. Often, the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: attention; visual search; perceptual load; information; guidance

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APA (6th Edition):

Biggs, A. T. (2011). How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/tq57np21k8z

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biggs, Adam Thomas. “How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/tq57np21k8z.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biggs, Adam Thomas. “How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention.” 2011. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Biggs AT. How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/tq57np21k8z.

Council of Science Editors:

Biggs AT. How Prior Information Influences the Guidance of Attention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/tq57np21k8z


University of Notre Dame

7. Josandeacute; E Lugo. Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design.

Degree: PhD, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, 2014, University of Notre Dame

  The product form plays an important role in a person’s judgment of a product, in part because the product’s appearance often provides the first… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Engineering; Design; Gestalt Principles

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APA (6th Edition):

Lugo, J. E. (2014). Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/m900ns08f3j

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lugo, Josandeacute; E. “Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/m900ns08f3j.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lugo, Josandeacute; E. “Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design.” 2014. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Lugo JE. Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/m900ns08f3j.

Council of Science Editors:

Lugo JE. Integrating Product form Preference into Engineering Design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2014. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/m900ns08f3j


University of Notre Dame

8. Kathleen Allan Targowski. Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2004, University of Notre Dame

  In language production, it has been shown that lemmas that share overlapping semantic features cause interference for each other’s production when encoded in the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: semantic complexity; spreading activation

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APA (6th Edition):

Targowski, K. A. (2004). Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/g445cc10p0g

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Targowski, Kathleen Allan. “Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs.” 2004. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/g445cc10p0g.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Targowski, Kathleen Allan. “Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs.” 2004. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Targowski KA. Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/g445cc10p0g.

Council of Science Editors:

Targowski KA. Semantic Complexity and Language Production: Simple vs. Complex Verbs. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/g445cc10p0g


University of Notre Dame

9. Heather D. Maxwell. A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2005, University of Notre Dame

  Athletic competitions have an undeniable position of priority in our lives. An entire nation, state, region or demographic can fall in love with a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: game enhancers; sport consumption; NCAA athletics; women’s basketball; sport fan motivation; Notre Dame women’s basketball; Notre Dame

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APA (6th Edition):

Maxwell, H. D. (2005). A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/jd472v2643p

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maxwell, Heather D.. “A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers.” 2005. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/jd472v2643p.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maxwell, Heather D.. “A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers.” 2005. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Maxwell HD. A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2005. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/jd472v2643p.

Council of Science Editors:

Maxwell HD. A Case Study of NCAA Division I Women’s College Basketball Fans: Sport Fan Motivation and Game Enhancers. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2005. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/jd472v2643p


University of Notre Dame

10. Margaret Windy McNerney. An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2006, University of Notre Dame

  The gateway hypothesis provides a theoretical link between task switching and prospective memory. Two experiments explored this relationship by measuring event-related potentials in a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: event-related potentials

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APA (6th Edition):

McNerney, M. W. (2006). An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/xp68kd19z5k

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNerney, Margaret Windy. “An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching.” 2006. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/xp68kd19z5k.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNerney, Margaret Windy. “An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching.” 2006. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

McNerney MW. An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/xp68kd19z5k.

Council of Science Editors:

McNerney MW. An Evaluation of the Realization of Delayed Intentions Using Task Switching. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/xp68kd19z5k


University of Notre Dame

11. Jarren Thomas Gonzales. The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2006, University of Notre Dame

  International graduate students are immersed in a new cultural environment and encounter influences that lead to changes in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. The immersion… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: international graduate students; cross-cultural relationships; grounded theory; acculturation

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APA (6th Edition):

Gonzales, J. T. (2006). The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/s7526972c6p

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gonzales, Jarren Thomas. “The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/s7526972c6p.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gonzales, Jarren Thomas. “The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation.” 2006. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Gonzales JT. The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/s7526972c6p.

Council of Science Editors:

Gonzales JT. The Acculturation Experience of International Graduate Students: A Qualitative Investigation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/s7526972c6p


University of Notre Dame

12. Robert Rene Rodriguez. Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2004, University of Notre Dame

  In Experiment 1, undergraduates (N = 87) wrote either about trivial events or about a secret while imagining (a) an accepting confidant, (b) a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: secrets; self-disclosure; social acceptance; confidants

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APA (6th Edition):

Rodriguez, R. R. (2004). Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724t46

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rodriguez, Robert Rene. “Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724t46.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rodriguez, Robert Rene. “Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants.” 2004. Web. 22 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Rodriguez RR. Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724t46.

Council of Science Editors:

Rodriguez RR. Health Effects of Disclosing Personal Secrets to Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Confidants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/ms35t724t46

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