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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Dr. Davide Hill, Committee Member"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Karen L. Williams. Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>.

Degree: Chemical Engineering, 2011, University of Notre Dame

Doped perovskites are a material of interest due to their ability to conduct protons in a temperature range desirable for intermediate temperature fuel cell applications. Despite much research aimed at improving the performance of these materials, the contributions of various material parameters to the conductivity are not well understood. In the case of Y-doped BaZrO3, published reports often disagree about its conductivity and structure. By employing combinatorial methods, the effect of compositional or process variations can be studied in a more rapid manner in order to identify potential candidate compositions, and possibly gain a better understanding of the material. In this work, a high-throughput impedance test cell was designed and built in order to test thin film samples by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Blanket thin film samples deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were created and tested, and a masking scheme was developed for fabrication of combinatorial libraries. Testing with the high-throughput cell revealed challenges to ensure the quality of acquired data, and the importance of the quality of electrical contact being made with the library wafers. For samples where high film quality was combined with reliable contacts, calculated properties for conductivity and activation energies were in agreement with literature values. Testing on BaZr0.9Y0.1O2.95 (BYZ10), a candidate electrolyte for intermediate temperature fuel cell applications was inconclusive due to experimental difficulties in obtaining high quality data. It is recommended that the for improved cell performance, refinement of the contact design is needed in order to facilitate more robust electrical contact between the cell and the wafer. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Alexander Mukasyan, Committee Member, Dr. Davide Hill, Committee Member, Dr. Paul J. McGinn, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: proton conducting oxides; proton conductivity; high throughput impedance; combinatorial; thin films; impedance spectroscopy; pulsed laser deposition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, K. L. (2011). Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/n583xs57x36

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Karen L.. “Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>.” 2011. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed August 03, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/n583xs57x36.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Karen L.. “Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>.” 2011. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Williams KL. Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/n583xs57x36.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Williams KL. Development of a high throughput impedance measurement device for new materials discovery</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/n583xs57x36

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

2. Alexandre Chapeaux. Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>.

Degree: Chemical Engineering, 2009, University of Notre Dame

Separation of alcohols from aqueous solutions usually requires energy intensive processes. We explore, here, the use of ionic liquids to remove alcohols from aqueous solutions. Ionic liquids are low melting salts with negligible volatility at ambient conditions. Therefore, the recovered alcohol could simply be evaporated from the ionic liquid solvent. To evaluate various ionic liquids for this application, this study details the phase behavior of binary and ternary systems of ionic liquids with water and alcohols. The mutual solubilities of various ionic liquids with water were determined in order to study the effect of the structure of the ionic liquid on the solubility. An increase in the alkyl chain length or in the substitution decreases the mutual solubility of the ionic liquid with water. The ionic liquids with the diacyanoamide anion have the largest mutual solubility with water, followed by ionic liquids with trifluoromethanesulfonate tetrafluoroborate, tetracyanoborate, hexafluorophosphate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide, and tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate anions. Further, the mutual solubilities of various ionic liquids with 1-hexanol and 1-octanol were measured, which confirmed published trends1-6 on how the IL structure modifies the mutual solubility. We also demonstrated that adding a hydroxyl group on the cation alkyl chain length decreases the mutual solubility with alcohols, and that ILs with the tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate anion have a smaller mutual solubility than those with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion but greater than ILs with the tetrafluoroborate anion. The second component of our work is to improve ionic liquids for various liquid-liquid separations. Necessary to design separation processes, ternary diagrams of systems with water and alcohols for various ionic liquids were developed. Further, distribution coefficients, selectivities and the number of stages for a liquid-liquid extractor are calculated using this data. In order to compare the energy requirement with other processes, this study also measured excess enthalpies for mixtures of ionic liquids and alcohols. Using these enthalpies, the energy required to evaporate the alcohol from the ionic liquid was calculated. We found that this energy intensive step requires approximately 50 kJ/molAlcohol while current processes require between 100-2000 kJ/molAlcohol 7, 8. We conclude that this method could reduce the energetic requirement in separating alcohols from water. References (1) Crosthwaite, J. M.; Aki, S.N.V.K.; Maginn, E. J.; Brennecke, J. F. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228-229, 303-309. (2) Crosthwaite, J. M.; Aki, S. N. V. K.; Maginn, E. J.; Brennecke, J. F. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 2004, 108, 5113-5119. (3) Crosthwaite, J. M.; Muldoon, M. J.; Aki, S. N. V. K.; Maginn, E. J.; Brennecke, J. F. Journal of Physical Chemistry B 2006, 110, 9354-9361. (4) Domanska, U.; Bogel-Lukasik, E.; Bogel-Lukasik, R. Journal of… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Joan Brennecke, Committee Member, Dr. Paul Bohn, Committee Member, Dr. Mark Stadtherr, Committee Member, Dr. Kenneth Henderson, Committee Chair, Dr. Davide Hill, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Water; Liquid-Liquid Extraction. Liquid-Liquid Equilibriu; Ionic Liquid; Separation; Alcohol

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chapeaux, A. (2009). Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/9880vq3004f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chapeaux, Alexandre. “Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>.” 2009. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed August 03, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/9880vq3004f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chapeaux, Alexandre. “Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>.” 2009. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Chapeaux A. Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9880vq3004f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chapeaux A. Extraction of Alcohols from Water Using Ionic Liquids</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/9880vq3004f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Notre Dame

3. Philip Alan Wingert. Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>.

Degree: Chemical Engineering, 2006, University of Notre Dame

Oxidants are substances with the ability to oxidize (remove electrons from) other substances. Oxidants are usually chemical substances with elements at high oxidation number (e.g., H2O2) or highly electronegative atoms that can gain one or two extra electrons by oxidizing a substance (e.g. O, F, and Cl). Detecting oxidants is important because oxidants have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many major diseases such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s, immune deficiency, etc. Their detection is also helpful because these species play important regulatory roles as signaling units and in the everyday function of tissues and cells. The specific objectives of this research were to develop and characterize a chemiluminescence reaction system encapsulated in an aqueous-cored, calcium phosphate based nanoshell to detect oxidants. Chemiluminescence, the emission of light as a result of a chemical reaction, has been used for decades to detect oxidative chemical processes involving trace metals and organic contaminants with high sensitivity, wide linear range and simple instrumentation. Great sensitivity also means that most of these reactions require carefully controlled conditions in solution. Nanoencapsulation can expand the usefulness of chemiluminescence detection of oxidants because it 1) makes them as sensitive or more sensitive to oxidants than the corresponding system in dilute solution, 2) is not affected by other molecules outside the capsule, and 3) has reasonable reaction kinetics (of the order of several minutes or less and reproducible). Nanoencapsulation can create a protective environment for chemical events, allowing quantitative analysis and detection of a system irrespective of the presence of interfering substances. This technology would also be useful in a wide variety of applications such as biosensors and online sensing, drug delivery, and medical diagnostics. The scientific and engineering challenges in this area involve synthesis as well as understanding the basic chemical processes inside nanocapsules. Luminol-hematin-H2O2 chemiluminescence was chosen for nanoshell encapsulation because 1) mechanisms for luminol chemiluminescence are well known, and 2) oxidation by H2O2 in aqueous alkaline solution leads to strong chemiluminescence when catalyzed by hematin, a biofriendly catalyst (CHAPTER 2). The effects of viscous additives and fluorophore sensitizers on luminol reactions in solution and inside nanoshells will be examined in CHAPTER 3. The basic aspects of chemiluminescent nanoshell material synthesis will be characterized in CHAPTER 4 and its performance with and without additives evaluated in CHAPTER 5. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Mark McCready, Committee Member, Dr. Davide Hill, Committee Member, Dr. Agnes Ostafin, Committee Member, Dr. Ryan Roeder, Committee Chair, Dr. David Leighton, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Oxidants; Luminol; Chemiluminescence; Nanoshells

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wingert, P. A. (2006). Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>. (Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/pr76f190d65

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wingert, Philip Alan. “Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>.” 2006. Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed August 03, 2020. https://curate.nd.edu/show/pr76f190d65.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wingert, Philip Alan. “Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>.” 2006. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Wingert PA. Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. [cited 2020 Aug 03]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/pr76f190d65.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wingert PA. Nanoencapsulation of Luminol-Hematin-H2O2 Chemiluminescence in Calcium Phosphate Nanoshells</h1>. [Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2006. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/pr76f190d65

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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