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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("Dennis Jacobs, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Xin Liu. Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, University of Notre Dame

The reaction of 5-20 eV O+ with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is investigated under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Ion induced modifications of HOPG are characterized in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) at various stages during exposure to O+. The incident energy of O+ ions is found to be positively correlated with the rate of oxygen uptake and negatively correlated with oxygen coverage in the steady state. In addition, three oxygen containing species are detected on HOPG, namely, C-O-C, O=C and HO-C=O. The variation of these species on graphite is monitored as a function of O+ dose and heating temperature. Ion-induced modifications of the graphite surface are monitored ex-situ by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with a variety of doses of impinging ions. The probability of defect initiation at room temperature is estimated and compared between O+ and Ne+ ions with different incident energies. Graphite etching efficiency is also compared between 5-eV O+ and O atom. A monolayer of mercaptopropylisobutyl-POSS on Au(111) is characterized by STM and atomic force microscope (AFM). Ion induced modifications of the POSS monolayer are monitored in situ by XPS. During O+ exposure, isobutyl side groups are continuously depleted from the surface, while the silicon concentration is kept constant and SiO2 is formed on the Au substrate. After prolonged O+ exposure, the gold surface eventually becomes oxidized but the oxide can be removed by annealing at 180 oC. The oxidation resistance of the POSS monolayer is compared with that of a dodecanethiol/Au(111) self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis Jacobs, Committee Chair, Dan Gezelter, Committee Member, Alex Kandel, Committee Member, Ken Kuno, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: TPD; ion induced modification; HOPG; XPS; STM; oxidation resistance; POSS; AFM

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APA (6th Edition):

Liu, X. (2011). Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/m039k358k0d

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Xin. “Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/m039k358k0d.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Xin. “Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>.” 2011. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Liu X. Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/m039k358k0d.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu X. Reaction of Hyperthermal Oxygen Ions with Graphite and Polyhedral Oligosilsequioxane (Poss) Monolayers</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2011. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/m039k358k0d


University of Notre Dame

2. Daniel Paul Fogarty. The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2007, University of Notre Dame

This thesis describes an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHVSTM)that is interfaced to a pulsed molecular-beam source. This is the first such instrument to allow in situ monitoring of a sample during molecular-beam exposure. This apparatus is used to investigate the effect of hyperthermal rare-gas bombardment on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers. STM images show that close-packed monolayers remain largely unchanged, even after repeated collisions with 0.4-eV argon and 1.3-eV xenon atoms. In contrast, gas-surface collisions do induce structural changes in the alkanethiol film near defects, domain boundaries, and disordered regions, with relatively larger changes observed for xenon-atom bombardment. High-energy, rare-gas collisions generally induce three types of structural transformations: domain boundary annealing, vacancy island migration, and phase changes. Collision-induced changes that occur tend to increase order and create more stable structures on the surface. Migration rates are calculated and compared for molecules in close-packed domains, at domain boundary defects, and along the perimeter of vacancy island defects. The number of nearest-neighbor molecules (within the 5 å¡A lattice distance) is stongly predictive of molecular stability with respect to rare-gas bombardment, and the overall dependence of stability on nearest neighbors is well fit by a simple exponential curve for molecules with 0–5 nearest neighbors. For most observed structural changes the incident direction of the molecular beam does not influence the direction of molecular motion, indicating that for this system, collision-induced migration proceeds through vibrational excitation of the molecular film. Advisors/Committee Members: Marya Lieberman, Committee Member, Dennis Jacobs, Committee Chair, Masaru K. Kuno, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: rare gas; alkanethiols SAM; surface science; molecular beam; STM

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fogarty, D. P. (2007). The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/37720c49z62

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fogarty, Daniel Paul. “The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/37720c49z62.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fogarty, Daniel Paul. “The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>.” 2007. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Fogarty DP. The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2007. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/37720c49z62.

Council of Science Editors:

Fogarty DP. The investigation of hyperthermal gas collisions on heterogeneous surfaces using an in situ scanning tunneling microscope</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2007. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/37720c49z62


University of Notre Dame

3. Shaofei Zhu. Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Physics, 2004, University of Notre Dame

Antimagnetic rotation in weakly deformed nuclei Pd100,101, and chiral rotation in triaxial nuclei Nd135,136 have been investigated by means of gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. These two modes of rotation are quite different from “standard” rotational motion observed in well deformed nuclei. In these new modes, the total angular momentum either originates purely from a few particles in high-j orbitals, or these orbitals couple to collective motion of a triaxial core. Two cascades of four “rotational-band-like’ transitions were observed in Pd100 and Pd101, respectively, and have been proposed as corresponding to antimagnetic rotation, based on the observed spectroscopic properties and a comparison with calculations in the configuration-dependent cranking Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism. Two Delta(I)=1 bands with close excitation energies and the same parity were observed in Nd135. These bands are directly linked by Delta(I)=1 and Delta(I)=2 transitions. The chiral nature of these two bands is confirmed by comparison with three-dimensional tilted axis cranking calculations. This is the first observation of a three-quasiparticle chiral structure and establishes the primarily geometric nature of this phenomenon. Although there are no chiral partner bands observed in even-even nucleus Nd135 from our data, TAC calculations indeed give chiral solutions related to several Delta(I)=1 bands in the nucleus Nd136. Advisors/Committee Members: Stefan G Frauendorf, Committee Member, Michael Douglas Hildreth, Committee Member, Umesh Garg, Committee Member, Ani Aprahamian, Committee Member, Dennis Jacobs, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: chiral symmetry; antimagnetic rotation; gamma spectroscopy; nuclear deformation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhu, S. (2004). Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348992

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhu, Shaofei. “Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348992.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhu, Shaofei. “Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>.” 2004. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhu S. Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348992.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhu S. Exotic Rotation in Weakly Deformed and Triaxial Nuclei</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2004. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/6682x348992

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