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You searched for +publisher:"University of Notre Dame" +contributor:("David Lodge, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Notre Dame

1. Brett Wescott Peters. Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>.

Degree: MS, Biological Sciences, 2010, University of Notre Dame

Invasive species cause significant ecological and economic impacts in a variety of ecosystem types around the world. Preventing the introduction of new invasive species is usually the economically optimal management. However, since prevention is rare, typical management practices rely on reducing the abundance of invasive species populations or maintaining populations at low abundance to mitigate the ecological and economic impacts of the invasion. However, the costs of controlling invasive species are often prohibitively high. Populations of invasive crayfish have been successfully reduced using a combination of mechanical harvest (baited traps) and biocontrol (enhancement of predatory fish populations by using conservative fishing regulations). The large scale application of these management strategies is currently unlikely due to the high costs associated with conducting long term trapping which require a substantial investment in personnel. Furthermore, the optimal fish species for controlling crayfish populations has never been rigorously identified. This thesis investigates ways to improve both crayfish trapping techniques and the manipulation of predatory fish communities to control crayfish populations. Our analyses show that small changes in trapping techniques (protecting the bait and increasing the size of the trap) can greatly increase the effectiveness of trapping and significantly lower the amount of effort necessary to reduce crayfish populations. In addition to manually removing crayfish, the manipulation of fish communities to consume more crayfish is an essential part of any program designed to reduce populations of invasive crayfish. Bioenergetics modeling, informed by a literature review of diet composition, shows smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) consume the most crayfish when younger (ages 2-9), while rock bass become the best crayfish predators when older (ages 10+). When analyzed at the community scale, our analysis suggests that community wide crayfish consumption decreases with increasing piscivore abundances, indicating that enhancement of piscivore populations, a common practice of fisheries managers, may harm crayfish control efforts. Furthermore, analysis of inter-water body diet composition suggests that certain predatory fishes may be ideal for controlling abundant (smallmouth bass, rock bass and yellow perch) while others (Lepomis spp. and rock bass) may be more effective in controlling sparse crayfish populations. The integration of empirical experiments, theoretical ecology and economics in this thesis yielded results which could directly inform cost effective management of invasive species. A similar multi-disciplinary approach could be used to inform the management of other invasive species where current technology is prohibitory costly to implement on a large scale. Advisors/Committee Members: Gary Belovsky, Committee Member, David Lodge, Committee Chair, Gary Lamberti, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: control; non-native species; rusty crayfish; invasive species; bioenergetics; crayfish

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Peters, B. W. (2010). Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>. (Masters Thesis). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/xw42n586h0z

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peters, Brett Wescott. “Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Notre Dame. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/xw42n586h0z.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peters, Brett Wescott. “Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>.” 2010. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Peters BW. Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/xw42n586h0z.

Council of Science Editors:

Peters BW. Evaluating Strategies for Controlling Invasive Crayfish Using Human and Fish Predation</h1>. [Masters Thesis]. University of Notre Dame; 2010. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/xw42n586h0z


University of Notre Dame

2. Matthew Alexander Barnes. Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2013, University of Notre Dame

Biological invasion, the establishment of organisms beyond their native ranges, represents powerful global change, disturbing native communities and nutrient cycles, disrupting human land use, and threatening human health. My research has addressed methodological and technological uncertainties associated with the ecology and management of biological invasions, focusing on prediction and detection of aquatic invasions. I considered aquatic plants as a case study to improve predictions of species transport and establishment. In laboratory experiments, plant fragment mass loss due to air exposure accurately predicted viability upon reintroduction to an aquatic environment, but similar periods of air exposure differentially affected different species. Understanding species traits like desiccation response can contribute to predicting dispersal. To improve predictions of where dispersing propagules may establish, I used the species distribution modeling program Maxent to predict potential North American distribution of the invasive aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata. I demonstrated that information gaps due to non-reporting of native occurrences alter model accuracy and transferability. I concluded that distribution modeling efforts must consider potential spatial biases in occurrence data. I have also advanced current knowledge about genetic surveillance of freshwater fish using environmental DNA (eDNA). In a laboratory experiment, biotic and abiotic environmental factors influenced Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) eDNA degradation. Logistic regression accurately predicted detection vs. nondetection over time, while eDNA concentration decayed exponentially. I explored the influence of environmental factors on eDNA particle size distribution (PSD) in experimental ponds. PSD did not differ between Common Carp and bigheaded carps (genus Hypophthalmichthys), but abiotic and biotic factors influenced PSD differences between ponds. Quantifying the influence of local environmental conditions on eDNA degradation and PSD rates will improve eDNA surveillance. Overall, the science of prediction and detection of aquatic invasions continues to progress rapidly. In my dissertation, I have evaluated uncertainties in current predictive methodologies and technologies to increase understanding of the ecology of invasive species and improve management and mitigation of damages due to aquatic invasions. In an era of global change, advancing science will allow a transition from simply reacting to the latest environmental crises to instead averting future challenges. Advisors/Committee Members: David Lodge, Committee Chair, Jeffrey Feder, Committee Member, Gary Lamberti, Committee Member, Jason McLachlan, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: eDNA; environmental DNA; model; dispersal; biological invasion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barnes, M. A. (2013). Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/5h73pv65d26

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barnes, Matthew Alexander. “Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/5h73pv65d26.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barnes, Matthew Alexander. “Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>.” 2013. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Barnes MA. Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/5h73pv65d26.

Council of Science Editors:

Barnes MA. Prediction, Detection, and Management of Aquatic Invasive Species</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2013. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/5h73pv65d26


University of Notre Dame

3. John Dana Rothlisberger. Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2009, University of Notre Dame

The introduction and establishment of species beyond the boundaries of their native ranges is an environmental issue of increasing scope and seriousness. This dissertation examines the consequences of the establishment of aquatic nonindigenous species (NIS) in the Laurentian Great Lakes (GL) region and also investigates alternatives for reducing anthropogenic spread of nuisance aquatic NIS. I first investigate the pathways by which aquatic NIS are introduced to the GL to learn if introduction pathway is related to where species originate and how likely they are to have spread beyond the GL basin. My analysis shows that ballast water release is highly likely to introduce new aquatic NIS to North America, whereas unauthorized release of organisms in trade tends to introduce to the GL aquatic NIS already established in North America. Moreover, it appears that it is primarily a matter of time before novel NIS that become established in the GL appear in other North American waterways. I also consider the relationship between introduction pathway and species impacts, finding that there is an apparent relationship, but that further study of species-specific impacts is needed to verify this finding. Given the importance of ballast water release in bringing novel species to the GL, I use a novel technique to estimate the economic impacts in the region of ecological changes caused by populations of aquatic NIS introduced by this pathway. This study concludes that the economic impacts of ballast water species are large, but are also uncertain. Nevertheless, policies that aim to reduce the likelihood of additional invasions via this pathway appear to be economically justifiable. As nuisance aquatic NIS in the GL region spread to other waterways, they bring with them ecological and economic impacts. The detrimental nature of these impacts motivates efforts to reduce the rate of spread. To inform such efforts, I test the efficacy of multiple methods for removing aquatic NIS from recreational boats and trailers. I found that visual inspection and hand removal is highly effective in removing the nuisance macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum, but that high-pressure washing is needed to effectively remove small-bodied organisms, including the exotic predatory zooplankter Bythotrephes longimanus. Beyond the tactics of how to clean boats, I evaluate efforts to strategically place boat cleaning stations on the landscape. My results show that a common predictive model is limited in its ability to predict which uninvaded lakes cleaning stations should protect. Instead, it appears that placing cleaning stations at invaded lakes to block the transport of invasive propagules is generally more likely to reduce landscape-level spread than protecting uninvaded lakes. Aquatic NIS are only one of many environmental and cultural factors that affect ecosystems and societal interactions with the natural environment. To put the importance of aquatic NIS in context with other… Advisors/Committee Members: Gary Belovsky, Committee Member, Gary Lamberti, Committee Member, Jessica Hellmann, Committee Member, David Lodge, Committee Chair.

Subjects/Keywords: structured expert judgment; ecological forecasting; environmental change; Laurentian Great Lakes; aquatic ecology; biological invasions; invasive species

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rothlisberger, J. D. (2009). Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Notre Dame. Retrieved from https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12184k

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rothlisberger, John Dana. “Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Notre Dame. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12184k.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rothlisberger, John Dana. “Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>.” 2009. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Rothlisberger JD. Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12184k.

Council of Science Editors:

Rothlisberger JD. Human-mediated dispersal of aquatic nonindigenous species: impacts and interventions</h1>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Notre Dame; 2009. Available from: https://curate.nd.edu/show/v979v12184k

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