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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Texas" +contributor:("Trost, Zina"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. Guck, Adam. The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear.

Degree: 2017, University of North Texas

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most prevalent and disabling health conditions in the US and worldwide. Biomedical explanations of acute injury fail to account for why some individuals experience remission of pain and restoration of physical function while others do not. Pain-related fear, accompanied by elevated appraisals of physical exertion and avoidance of physical activity, has emerged as a central psychosocial risk factor for transition from acute injury to chronic pain and disability. Research has indicated that these pain-related factors may be maintained through observational learning mechanisms. To date, no studies have experimentally examined the role of observational learning and pain-related fear in the context of actual musculoskeletal injury. Accordingly, the present study examined the impact of observational learning and pain-related fear on activity appraisals and exertion following experimentally- induced acute low back injury. Healthy participants' appraisal of standardized movement tasks along with measures of physical exertion were collected prior to and following a procedure designed to induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) to the lower back. Following induction of DOMS, participants observed a video prime depicting CLBP patients exhibiting either high or low pain behavior during similar standardized movements. In line with hypothesized effects, participants assigned to the high pain behavior prime demonstrated greater elevation in pain and harm appraisals as well as greater decrement in physical exertion. Further in line with hypotheses, significant changes in appraisal and physical performance following the high pain behavior prime were only observed among participants endorsing high pain-related fear during baseline assessment. Discussion of findings addresses potential mechanisms of action as well as study limitations and direction for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Boals, Adriel, Watkins, C. Edward, Trost, Zina.

Subjects/Keywords: chronic pain; disability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Guck, A. (2017). The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1011777/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Guck, Adam. “The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1011777/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Guck, Adam. “The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear.” 2017. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Guck A. The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1011777/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Guck A. The Impact of Observational Learning on Physical Activity Appraisal and Exertion Following Experimental Back Injury and the Role of Pain-Related Fear. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2017. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1011777/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

2. Wilkerson, Allison K. Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period.

Degree: 2015, University of North Texas

New mothers often complain of impaired cognitive functioning, and it is well documented that women experience a significant increase in sleep disturbance after the birth of a child. Sleep disturbance has been linked to impaired cognitive performance in several populations, including commercial truck drivers, airline pilots, and medical residents, though this relationship has rarely been studied in postpartum women. In the present study 13 pregnant women and a group of 22 non-pregnant controls completed one week of actigraphy followed by a battery of neuropsychological tests and questionnaires in the last month of pregnancy (Time 1) and again at four weeks postpartum (Time 2). Pregnant women experienced significantly more objective and subjective sleep disturbance than the control group at both time points. They also demonstrated more impairment in objective, but not subjective cognitive functioning. Preliminary analyses indicated increased objective sleep fragmentation from Time 1 to Time 2 predicted decreased objective cognitive performance from Time 1 to Time 2, though small sample size limited the power of these findings. Implications for perinatal women and need for future research were discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Taylor, Daniel John, Parsons, Thomas D., Trost, Zina.

Subjects/Keywords: postpartum; sleep; cognitive performance; New mothers.; Sleep disorders.; Cognition.; Puerperium.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilkerson, A. K. (2015). Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc804950/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilkerson, Allison K. “Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc804950/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilkerson, Allison K. “Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilkerson AK. Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc804950/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wilkerson AK. Cognitive Performance as a Function of Sleep Disturbance in the Postpartum Period. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc804950/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

3. Garner, Ashley Nicole. The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis.

Degree: 2015, University of North Texas

Research has begun to explore the presence and role of health-related injustice perceptions in samples of individuals who experience chronic pain associated with traumatic injury. Existing studies indicate that higher level of injustice perception is associated with poorer physical and psychosocial outcomes. However, to date, few clinical populations have been addressed. The aim of the current study was to explore injustice perceptions in a sample of individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury (SCI), as research suggests that such individuals are likely to experience cognitive elements characteristic of injustice perception (e.g., perceptions of irreparable loss, blame, and unfairness). The study explored the relationship between participants’ level of perceived injustice and several variables associated with outcomes following SCI (depression, pain, and disability) at initial admission to a rehabilitation unit and at three months following discharge. The Injustice Experience Questionnaire was used to measure injustice perceptions. IEQ was found to significantly contribute to depression and anger at baseline. IEQ significantly contributed to depression, present pain intensity, and anger at follow-up. The implication of these preliminary findings may be beneficial for development of future interventions, as many individuals in the United States experience the lifelong physical and psychological consequences of SCI at a high personal and public cost. Advisors/Committee Members: Trost, Zina, Kelly, Kimberly, Watkins, C. Edward, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: spinal cord injury; perceived injustice; adjustment; Adjustment (Psychology); Spinal cord  – Wounds and injuries  – Patients  – Psychology.; Justice.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garner, A. N. (2015). The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc822837/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garner, Ashley Nicole. “The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc822837/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garner, Ashley Nicole. “The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Garner AN. The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc822837/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Garner AN. The Role of Injury-related Injustice Perception in Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury: an Exploratory Analysis. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc822837/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.