Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of North Texas" +contributor:("Johnson, Ken"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Texas

1. Ewin, Kristan Foust. The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East.

Degree: 2012, University of North Texas

The purpose of the Roman Argei ceremony, during which the Vestal Virgins harvested made and paraded rush puppets only to throw them into the Tiber, is widely debated. Modern historians supply three main reasons for the purpose of the Argei: an agrarian act, a scapegoat, and finally as an offering averting deceased spirits or Lares. I suggest that the ceremony also related to war and the spectacle of displaying war casualties. I compare the ancient Near East and Rome and connect the element of war and husbandry and claim that the Argei paralleled the sacred marriage. in addition to an agricultural and purification rite, these rituals may have served as sympathetic magic for pre- and inter-war periods. As of yet, no author has proposed the Argei as a ceremony related to war. By looking at the Argei holistically I open the door for a new direction of inquiry on the Argei ceremony, fertility cults in the Near East and in Rome, and on the execution of war criminals.The Argei and new year’s sacred marriage both occurred during the initiation of campaign and spring planting and harvest season. Both in the ancient Near East and in Rome, animal victims were sacrificed and displayed through impaling, crucifixion, and hanging for fertility and in war. for both Rome and the Near East war casualties were displayed on sacred trees. Through the Near East cultures a strong correlation existed between impaling, hanging, and crucifixion in war and Sacred Tree fertility worship. By examining Roman tree worship, military rituals, and agricultural ceremonies a similar correlation becomes apparent. on the same day of the Argei, Mars was married to the anthropomorphized new year and within the month became a scapegoat expelled from the city. Additionally, on the first day of the Argei boys became soldiers. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuhrmann, Christopher J., Johnson , Ken, Roberts, Walt.

Subjects/Keywords: phallus; sacred tree; sacred marriage; Liberalia; Anna Perenna; Asherah; dying god; Lares; mlk; saucella Argeorum

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ewin, K. F. (2012). The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115076/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ewin, Kristan Foust. “The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East.” 2012. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115076/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ewin, Kristan Foust. “The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East.” 2012. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ewin KF. The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115076/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ewin KF. The Argei: Sex, War, and Crucifixion in Rome and the Ancient Near East. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2012. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc115076/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

2. Wheatley, Warren. Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context.

Degree: 2013, University of North Texas

I argue that some ancient Jewish sects, specifically the community at Qumran and the early Christians, did in fact write against, speak out against, and interpret ancient tests as being against their fellow Jews, the Temple, Jerusalem or all three. Given the time in which these occurred, I argue that those sects believed that the Roman Empire would be means in which their god would punish/destroy Jews that did not believe as they did, the Temple that did not represent what they thought it should, and Jerusalem as they believed it had become a sinful city. I examine the writings and persons of the Greek Bible. I examine specifics such as the Parable of the Tenants and demonstrate that this was delivered against Jewish leadership and the Olivet Discourse that, like the book of Jubilees, presents a series of tribulations that will fall on a wicked generation, specifically the one living in Jerusalem during the first century C.E. I also demonstrate how the motif of these writings affected the book of Revelation. I examine the prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible and show how the author used them as allusions in regards to the Whore of Babylon that appear in the book of Revelation. In doing so, I demonstrate that the Whore of Babylon is correctly identified as the city of Jerusalem. Additionally I show that the author used Babylon, the ancient foe of Israel, as a metaphor to demonstrate what he believed Israel had become. Lastly, I examine the author, a man named John, and the social world he lived in and the time he wrote during. I demonstrate that the commonly held belief of persecution against the early Christians and the use of Roman religion, such as the imperial cult, has been over stated and has led not only to a misinterpretation of chapters 17 and 18 in the book of Revelation, but they have led to an overall misunderstanding of the book as a whole. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuhrmann, Christopher, Johnson, Ken, Roberts, Walt.

Subjects/Keywords: Whore of Babylon; Book of Revelation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wheatley, W. (2013). Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407768/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wheatley, Warren. “Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407768/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wheatley, Warren. “Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context.” 2013. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wheatley W. Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407768/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wheatley W. Historical and Theological Backgrounds of the Whore of Babylon in Revelation 17 & 18 in a Jewish Context. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407768/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

3. Lopez, Javier. Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability.

Degree: 2013, University of North Texas

The Jewish revolt against the Romans in 66 CE can be seen as the culmination of years of oppression at the hands of their Roman overlords. The first-century historian Josephus narrates the developments of the war and the events prior. A member of the priestly class and a general in the war, Josephus provides us a detailed account that has long troubled historians. This book was an attempt by Josephus to explain the nature of the war to his primary audience of predominantly angry and grieving Jews. The causes of the war are explained in different terms, ranging from Roman provincial administration, Jewish apocalypticism, and Jewish internal struggles. The Jews eventually reached a tipping point and engaged the Romans in open revolt. Josephus was adamant that the origin of the revolt remained with a few, youthful individuals who were able to persuade the country to rebel. This thesis emphasizes the causes of the war as Josephus saw them and how they are reflected both within The Jewish War and the later work Jewish Antiquities. By observing the Roman provincial administration spanning 6-66 CE, I argue that Judaea had low moments sprinkled throughout the time but in 66 there was something particularly different, according to Josephus. Josephus presents the governors and other important characters in the war in a very distinct way through rhetoric, narrative, and other methodology. The idea of a beginning to this revolt, no matter how obscure or hidden by Josephus, is the reason I want to examine the works of Josephus the historian. Advisors/Committee Members: Fuhrmann, Christopher J., Johnson, Ken, Roberts, Walt.

Subjects/Keywords: Josephus; Jewish Revolt; Jewish War

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lopez, J. (2013). Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407792/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lopez, Javier. “Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407792/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lopez, Javier. “Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability.” 2013. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lopez J. Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407792/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lopez J. Josephus’ Jewish War and the Causes of the Jewish Revolt: Re-examining Inevitability. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc407792/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.